National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Excessive Heat Continues Across the West

Dangerously hot temperatures are expected again for much of the Pacific Northwest and portions of the Southwest. Elsewhere, severe thunderstorms and heavy rain are possible across portions of New Mexico and southern High Plains. Read More >

It will be partly sunny today with a chance of showers and isolated thunderstorms across the west and south. Highs will be in the 80s with east winds 5 to 10 mph.
Mostly cloudy tonight with a chance of showers along and south of a Cisco to Hillsboro to Palestine line. Lows will be in the mid 60s to lower 70s with east to southeast winds around 5 mph.
There will be low chances of showers and thunderstorms across parts of North and Central Texas Monday through Thursday. Highs will be in the mid 80s to lower 90s and lows will be in the upper 60s to upper 70s.
There will be low chances of showers and thunderstorms across the mainly east of I-35 Friday and along and north of the I-20 corridor Friday night and Saturday. Highs will be in the lower to middle 90s and lows will be in the 70s.
Almost everyone picked up measurable (at least 0.01") rain late Friday and into Saturday across North and Central Texas. The big winners were generally west of I-35, where numerous locations picked up in excess of 1.5" of rain. DFW was a big winner as well, recording a daily rainfall record of 3.84"!
Yesterday's 3.84 inches of rain at DFW not only set a daily record for June 24th, but is also more than what we normally receive during the whole month of June. Yesterday's rainfall also put us slightly above normal for the year. So far this month, we have received 7.93 inches of rain which would make this the 5th wettest June in the 119 years of records for the official Dallas Fort Worth site. The top 4 wettest Junes are 11.58 in 1928, 11.10 in 2007, 10.49 in 2004, and 8.75 in 1989.
Yesterday's 3.31 inches of rain at Waco not only set a daily record for June 24th, but is also almost as much as we normally receive during the whole month of June. Yesterday's rainfall also put us 6.17 inches above normal for the year. So far this month, we have received 4.72 inches of rain which would make this the 25th wettest June in the 116 years of records for the official Waco site. The top 5 wettest Junes are 12.06 in 1961, 10.55 in 1927, 10.21 in 1938. 9.89 in 1919 and 8.76 in 2007.

 
Text Product Selector (Selected product opens in current window)
Latest Text Products Issued (Experimental)
Safe Rooms Icon Cooperatirve Rainfall (CoCoRaHs) icon Storm Ready Icon AirNow Icon

North Texas Severe Weather April 23, 2008
Erath-Palo Pinto and Tarrant-Johnson Counties

During the late afternoon hours on Wednesday, April 23, 2008, supercell thunderstorms spread from west Texas into parts of north Texas. Additional thunderstorms developed through the evening hours as the complex of thunderstorms moved east. Reports of tornadoes, very large hail, damaging straight-line winds, and flash flooding accompanied the thunderstorms.  (Read the Local Storm Report Summary)

The WSR-88D radar images below show a supercell thunderstorm near the Erath - Palo Pinto County line at 647 pm CDT. The bright red and pink colors in the radar reflectivity represent values up to 70 dBZ that were caused by very large hailstones. Also note the distinct hook echo on the southern part of the storm straight west of Lipan. The Doppler Velocity image, also taken at 647 pm CDT, shows a large, well-defined counterclockwise circulation pattern across extreme northern Erath County. The red colors in the storm-relative mean radial velocity image indicate winds blowing AWAY from the radar located at KFWS (Fort Worth Spinks airport); the green colors represent winds blowing toward the radar (or from west to east). This supercell thunderstorm prompted the issuance of Tornado Warnings across this area Wednesday evening. This statement gives a brief summary of the known tornadoes that occurred in this area.

KFWS Reflectivity Image at 6:47 pm CDT - April 23, 2008

KFWS Storm Relative Velocity  Image at 6:47 pm CDT - April 23, 2008

KFWS Reflectivity Image at 6:47 pm CDT - April 23, 2008

KFWS Storm Relative Velocity  Image at 6:47 pm CDT - April 23, 2008

 

These two WSR-88D images were taken at a radar elevation angle of 1.5 degrees at 832 pm CDT on 4/23/08. Intense thunderstorms were moving
across Johnson and southwest Tarrant County. The pattern in the red colors (50+ dBZ) resembles an arc shape or "bow", indicating that very strong low level winds were associated with the line of storms across this area. The mean radial velocity image shows a distinct transition area where outbound (relative to the KFWS radar site which is between Crowley and Rendon) velocities are located next to inbound velocities along a radar radial. This transition zone, which represents a region of intense horizontal wind shear, is best defined on the velocity image from the southwest tip of Tarrant County eastward to between Joshua and Burleson. This thunderstorm moved northeast into Tarrant County and was responsible for producing a tornado near Crowley. The results of the damage survey are available.

KFWS Reflectivity Image at 8:32 pm CDT - April 23, 2008 (1.5 degrees)

KFWS Storm Relative Velocity Image at 8:32 pm CDT - April 23, 2008

KFWS Reflectivity Image at 8:32 pm CDT - April 23, 2008 (1.5 degrees)

KFWS Storm Relative Velocity Image at 8:32 pm CDT - April 23, 2008