National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

There will be a chance of showers and isolated thunderstorms along and southeast of a Lampasas to Glen Rose to Sulphur Springs line where cloudy skies will persist. Elsewhere, clouds will be slowly on the decrease from northwest to southeast. Highs will range from the mid 50s southeast to the mid 60s west. West winds 5 to 10 mph will become north to northeast mid to late afternoon.
Mostly clear and cool conditions will give way to increasing clouds and patchy fog overnight. Low temperatures will range from the lower 40s along the Red River to near 50s across the south. Otherwise, a slight chance of rain is expected across the southeast tonight.
It will be cloudy Sunday with a chance of showers. Highs will be in the upper 50s northeast to the mid 70s west. Winds will be southerly at 10 to 20 mph.
There will be chances of showers and thunderstorms Monday through Tuesday with the highest chances being on Tuesday as a cold front approaches. There will also be a risk for some strong to severe storms IF the capping inversion can break during the late afternoon and evening on Monday and then into Tuesday. There is a good deal of uncertainty regarding this, so continue to check back for updates as we fine tune the forecast for early next week.
An unsettled weather pattern will remain over the region Tuesday and Wednesday with numerous showers and some thunderstorms expected. Although a few strong to severe storms will be possible on Tuesday, moderate to heavy rainfall and some flooding will be the more likely threat, especially Wednesday.

 
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Supercells of April 25, 2005

Radar image from Ft. Worth Radar showing supercell storms across  Erath County at 5:02 pm CDT.

Around 3 PM, strong thunderstorms began forming in southern Parker and northern Erath counties. These storms quickly became supercellular and split into several individual storms. This activity generally moved east at around 35 mph. The strongest storms of the afternoon occurred over Dallas, Johnson, and Ellis counties. Quarter size hail was reported at 3:20 PM in Weatherford. Hail reports continued as the storms moved across the Dallas Fort Worth metroplex, ranging from marble to quarter size. Most impressive was not the size of the hail, but the quantity that fell! Drifts of hail up to 1 foot deep were common just south of the metroplex.

Five weak, brief tornadoes were reported with these storms. One was reported at 4:14 PM in south Fort Worth, just east of the Miller Brewery. 

A second tornado occurred west of Alvarado, in Johnson County, at approximately 4:25 PM. Brief tornadoes were reported near Mansfield; between Cedar Hill and Midlothian; and near Maypearl in Ellis county at 5:00. Damage to tree limbs, television antennas, and outbuildings resulted from this activity.

Supercell in Ellis County at 5:02 pm CDT

 


Later that evening, severe weather continued as storms moved across extreme north Texas. Hail to the size of golf balls and larger was reported in Fannin, Delta, and Hopkins counties. Downburst winds combined with the hail to damage homes and vehicles, especially in the Bailey community in southern Fannin County. 

Picture of hail drifts in Alvarado

Picture of funnel clouds at Whitney State Park.

Hail Covered the Ground in Alvarado

Funnel Clouds at Lake Whitney State Park

Radar image from Ft. Worth Radar showing supercell storms across SE Tarrant and East Johnson counties.
     Supercells in Tarrant/Johnson
           counties at 4:32 pm CDT
   

Funnel cloud picture near Miller Brewery in Southern Tarrant County.

Wall Cloud in Southwest Ft. Worth near Alta Mesa Blvd.

Wall Cloud near Miller Brewery 
in Southern Tarrant Co.

Wall Cloud in Southwest Ft. Worth 
(near Alta Mesa Blvd)