National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Heavy Rain, Flooding Possible From Remnants of Tropical Storm Cindy

The remnants of Tropical Storm Cindy will spread heavy rain into the Tennessee and Ohio Valleys today - and into the Appalachians and Mid-Atlantic tonight. Flash flooding is possible in these areas. Strong to severe thunderstorms are also possible in these areas. Flash flooding is life threatening. Never drive your car across flooded roadways. Read More >

It will be mostly sunny and hot today. A few thunderstorms will be possible late this afternoon along and north of a Graham to Sulphur Springs line. Highs will be in the 90s to 102 degrees. The combination of the heat and humidity will make it feel like 100 to 110 degrees!
A Heat Advisory is in effect from Noon through 7 PM today for much of North and Central Texas. The heat and humidity will combine to make it feell like it is 105 to 110 degrees. Take extra precautions if working or spending time outdoors. Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. When possible...reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Wear light weight and loose fitting clothing when possible and drink plenty of water. Check on persons with health problems and the elderly as they are the most susceptible to heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
Thunderstorm chances will increase across the region this evening. There will be low chances along the Red River late afternoon and chances will spread south to the I-20 corridor during the early evening and down toward Central Texas late evening. In addition to cloud to ground lightning, a few storms may become severe, producing wind gusts to 60 mph and hail up to 1 inch in diameter. Heavy rain may result in some localized flooding.
There will be a threat for showers and thunderstorms tonight and tomorrow across North and Central TX. The greatest rain/storm potential will be in the overnight to late-morning hours. Rain chances will lower Saturday afternoon for areas north of I-20. Showers and storms are expected to move south afternoon and evening. Widespread severe weather is NOT expected, but gusty winds, lightning and brief heavy rain will be possible.
Waco may reach 100 degrees for the first time this year today. Here are some interesting 100 degree day information for Waco. * The average first 100 degree day is July 4th. * The average last 100 degree day is August 29th. * The earliest occurrence of 100 degrees was March 28th, back in 1971. * The latest occurrence of 100 degrees was October 4th, back in 1983. * We average 24 days with highs of 100 degrees or higher.
Good news! Thanks to a summer cold front that will sweep through North and Central Texas later tonight, a break from the summer heat is expected the next couple of days. Temperatures will be below seasonal normals. Forecast high temperatures will stay mostly in the 80s Saturday through Tuesday, then, warming up to the 90s by the end of next week.

 
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April 3rd 2012 Severe Weather Outbreak


Summary of Events

Picture of EF-2 Tornado in Arlington as it moved over Highway 287
Arlington Tornado as it moved over Hwy 287 (Track 2)

There have been 17 confirmed tornadoes.  Click the links above for additional information and photos.

An upper level low and a cold front clashed with a very warm and very unstable air mass to produce numerous tornadoes and severe thunderstorms across much of North and Central Texas on Tuesday April 3rd, 2012. No lives were lost, but 30 people were injured.  A total of 55 Severe Thunderstorm Warnings and 18 Tornado Warnings were issued by the Fort Worth office of the National Weather Service between 7:32 am and 8:13 pm CDT.


The tornadoes are listed here, but are not necessarily in chronological order

Tornado number 1 occurred southeast of Joshua, in Johnson county. This tornado produced EF1 damage. The path length was 1.1 miles and the path width was approximately 60 yards wide.

Tornado number 2 occurred in Kennedale and Arlington. This tornado produced EF2 damage. The path length was 4.6 miles, and the path width was approximately 150 yards. This width has been updated from earlier reports.

Tornado number 3 occurred in Lancaster and Dallas. This tornado produced EF2 damage. The path length was 7.1 miles, and the width was approximately 200 yards.

Tornado number 4 occurred in Mesquite. This tornado produced EF0 damage. The path length was 0.3 miles, and the width was approximately 30 yards.

Tornado number 5 occurred near Forney, in Kaufman County. This tornado produced EF3 damage. The path length was 8 miles, and the width was approximately 150 yards.

Tornado number 6 occurred near Royse City, beginning in Rockwall County before moving northeast into Hunt County. This tornado produced EF2 damage The path length was 3.1 miles, and the width was approximately 400 yards. 

 

 

 

Tornado number 7 was observed by several storm spotters approximately 6 miles south of Greenville. This tornado produced EF0 damage over open country. The path length was one half mile, and the width was approximately 50 yards.  

Tornado number 8 was observed by law enforcement officials 4 miles south of Cumby, in Hunt County. This tornado produced EF0 damage over open country. The path length was one quarter mile, and the width was approximately 25 yards.

Tornado number 9 was observed by law enforcement officials 2 miles southwest of Sulphur Springs, in Hopkins County. This tornado was brief, producing EF0 damage over open country. The path length was one tenth of a mile, and the width was approximately 25 yards.  

Tornado number 10 was observed by law enforcement officials and storm spotters near Sulphur Springs. This tornado produced EF0 damage over mainly open country, producing tree damage and damaging power lines and power poles. The path length was approximately one half mile, and the width was approximately 50 yards.

Tornado number 11 was observed by storm spotters 6 miles northwest of Winnsboro, in far southeastern Hopkins County. This tornado produced EF0 damage, mainly damaging trees. The path length was approximately one half mile, and the width was approximately 25 yards. 

Tornado number 12 was a brief EF0 tornado that occurred in the northern sections of Grand Prairie. The path length was 0.4 miles, and the width was 60 yards.
Tornado number 13 was an EF0 tornado that occurred in the city of Irving. The path length was 1.4 miles, and the width was 40 yards.

Tornado number 14 occurred in Dallas, near Skyline High School. This tornado produced EF0 damage. The path length was 0.1 miles, and the width was 25 yards.

Tornado number 15 occurred in a far southern portion of the city of Denton. This tornado produced minimal EF0 damage. The path length was one quarter mile, and the width was 50 yards.

Tornado number 16 occurred near the community of Poetry in northern Kaufman County. Associated with the same supercell that produced the EF3 tornado in Forney, this EF0 tornado developed shortly after, to the northeast of Forney. The path length was one half mile, and the width was 75 yards.

Tornado number 17 occurred in the Coppell area. This tornado produced EF0 damage in a narrow, non-continuous 2 mile path, and the width was 75 yards.

 

 Additional information continues to come into the National Weather Service, and the number of confirmed tornadoes may increase.

   

Radar loop showing supercell thunderstorms moving across the D/FW Metroplex