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Turning Stormy in the Northwest

An active fall storm pattern developing in the Pacific Northwest this week will bring areas of heavy rain and high elevation snow. Northern California will benefit from rainfall this week that will aid firefighters given the recent large wildfires. Read More >

Sunny skies and low humidity will continue today. After another cool start to the day, temperatures will reach the mid to upper 70s by midday. Afternoon temperatures will peak in the 80s across much of the region. South winds will increase a bit today but will generally be around 10 mph or less.
Southerly winds will bring increasing Gulf moisture to the region during Thursday through Friday. Low chances of shower and thunderstorms will return late Thursday night through Friday evening with an upper level disturbance. Highs will be in the upper 70s to lower 80s Friday, while lows each night will become warmer with more humidity each night with lows in the 60s area-wide by Friday night into Saturday morning.
There will be a low chance of showers and thunderstorms on Saturday. The better threat for more organized thunderstorms will be late Saturday night and Sunday. A few storms will have the potential to become strong to marginally severe with gusty downburst winds and hail, mainly along and ahead of the front. Frequent cloud to ground lightning will likely accompany storms later Saturday night and on Sunday.
With a large upper level trough and associated cold front arriving this weekend, here's the current timing of hazards and impacts for weekend plans. The wettest period and chance for a few strong to severe storms will be late Saturday night and Sunday. In addition, localized heavy rainfall between 1 to 2 inches east of I-35/35E on Sunday with brief minor flooding possible. We'll continue to refine forecasts with this system as we move toward the weekend. Timing , hazards, and impacts are all subject to change.

 
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December 29th, 2006 North Texas Tornado Outbreak 
Radar Images

Johnson County Dec 29th, 2006 Tornado Radar Images
These images show the KFWS reflectivity and storm relative mean
radial velocity data from southern Johnson County at 351 PM CST
on 12/29/06. The supercell thunderstorm that produced the tornado
is centered northeast of Rio Vista. A well defined hook is evident
in the reflectivity image on the east side of the supercell storm.


The storm relative velocity image shows an intense gate-to-gate
circulation feature (red next to green) within the reflectivity hook.
The storm was moving north at around 40 mph and was responsible for
a long-track tornado across western Hill County into central and
eastern Johnson County. 


Damage along parts of the path of this long-track tornado justified an F-2 rating, with maximum estimated winds of around 135 mph.



 Limestone county December 29th, 2006 Tornado Radar Pictures

 

 

 



These images show the KFWS reflectivity and storm relative mean radial velocity data from central Limestone County at 159 PM CST on 12/29/06. The supercell thunderstorm that produced the tornado is centered west of Groesbeck. 

The storm relative velocity image shows a well-defined circulation couplet (red next to green) just west of the town of Groesbeck in central Limestone County. 

The storm was moving north at over 40 mph and was responsible for
producing F-2 tornado damage in a swath across Limestone County.





Bosque County December 29th 2006 Tornado Radar Pictures






These images show the radar reflectivity and storm relative mean 
radial velocity data from Bosque County at 248 PM cST on 12/29/06.
The radar images are from the KFWS (Fort Worth - Spinks) WSR-88D
radar. The supercell thunderstorm that produced the tornado is 
shown just east of Clifton at this time. The storm relative velocity
image shows a well-defined circulation couplet (red next to green) 
southeast of Clifton in southern Bosque County. 

When the Doppler radar shows strong outbound velocities (red colors) 
very close to high inbound velocities (green) in the low levels of
the storm, that is evidence of strong low level rotation which could
be associated with a tornado on the ground. 

The storm was moving north at 40 mph and was responsible for F-2
tornado damage east of Clifton.