National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce
News Headlines

It will be clear and cool tonight with lows mostly in the 40s. A few of the normally colder spots will reach the upper 30s and some parts of the DFW Metroplex will have lows around 50 degrees. Winds will be north to northwest at 5 to 10 mph.
Dry, pleasant fall weather is expected this week. Another front will bring cool and breezy conditions to the region Monday night and Tuesday. Highs will be in the 70s and 80s with low in the 40s and 50s.
There is a good chance for temperatures to be below-normal at the end of October and for the start of November. This could potentially mean a cooler than normal Halloween with temperatures in the 60s possible.

 
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Lightning...the underrated killer

Lightning Intro
Did you Know
Lightning Safety
Myths vs. Facts

MYTHS VS. FACTS

 
MYTH:

If it is not raining, then there is no danger from lightning.

Picture of Bolt From Blue
It's Not Raining - No Way I'll Get Struck

FACT:

Lightning often strikes outside of heavy rain and may occur as far as 10 miles away from any rainfall.

   
MYTH:

The rubber soles of shoes or rubber tires on a car will protect your from being struck by lightning.

Picture of Shoe
My Shoes Will Protect Me From Lightning

FACT:

Rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide NO protection from lightning. However, the steel frame of a hard-topped vehicle provides increased protection if you are not touching metal.

   
MYTH:

People struck by lightning carry an electrical charge and should not be touched.

Picture of Lightning Victims
Don't Touch Them Or You'll Get Shocked

FACT:

Lightning-strike victims carry NO electrical charge and should be attended to immediately.

   
MYTH:

"Heat Lightning" occurs after very hot summer days and poses no threat.

Picture of Lightning Causing a Fire
Heat Lightning Strikes When It's Hot

FACT:

What is referred to as "heat lightning" is actually lightning from a thunderstorm too far away for thunder to be heard. However, the storm may be moving in your direction!