National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Severe Thunderstorms for the Midwest, Monsoon in the Southwest, Heat Continues in Southern and Central U.S on Wednesday

Strong to severe thunderstorms will be possible Wednesday in portions of the Midwest. Heavy rain, hail and damaging winds will all be possible, but a tornado cannot be ruled out either. The monsoonal flash flood threat remains in the Desert Southwest and Southern Rockies. Hot temperatures continue in the Southern Plains and Mississippi Valley. Heat Advisories are in effect. Read More >

It will be mostly sunny and hot again today. Isolated showers are possible this afternoon along and northwest of a Comanche to Sherman line. There is also a slight chance of thunderstorms southeast of a Killeen to Canton line. Gusty winds and heavy rain as well as cloud to ground lightning may accompany some of the storms. Highs today will be in the mid 90s to around 100 degrees with heat index values of 99 to 109 degrees. A Heat Advisory is in effect for areas along and east of a Killeen to Bowie line through 8 PM Thursday where heat index values will reach 105 to 109 degrees. Remember to stay hydrated, avoid strenuous activity, and never leave pets or children unattended!
A Heat Advisory will be in effect through Thursday evening for counties along and east of a Bowie to Killeen line, including the I- 35 corridor. High temperatures in this area will rise into the upper 90s to 102 degrees. When you factor in the humidity, the heat index values will rise into the 105 to 109 range.
A cold front will approach the region on Friday, and this will provide a focus for some showers and thunderstorms across North and Central Texas through the weekend and into early next week. In addition, extra cloud cover will help lower temperatures by a few degrees on Saturday and into Monday. Some upper 80 and lower 90 degree readings are even possible on Monday!
It is July in Texas and it's hot. So you're probably thinking why is the National Weather Service telling us about the heat? Well, it's simple: heat kills. Know the signs of heat exhaustion versus heat stroke. Faint or dizzy with excessive sweating, that's heat exhaustion. Get to a cooler place and drink water. What if you or someone you know, is in the heat and suddenly stop sweating, get a throbbing headache and/or nausea? Well, these are signs of a Heat Stroke and this is an emergency situation. Your body is no longer able to cool off and if you don't get immediate care---it can be potentially fatal. If you're suffering from Heat Stroke, you should call 9-1-1 and then immediately take action to cool down. as you wait for help to arrive.

 
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North Texas Storm Data
prepared by the National Weather Service
in Fort Worth, TX

Preliminary Storm Data is posted between 60 and 90 days after the last day of the month.

This section of the Fort Worth National Weather Service Home Page contains unofficial information about storms that have occurred in North Texas. Material is organized by month, so readers should be  able to find the information wanted fairly quickly by simply knowing the approximate date of the event.

Storm Data is an official publication of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), part of the Department of Commerce. NOAA prepares, funds, and distributes these official documents which are available by subscription. Subscription, pricing, and ordering information is available from: NOAA Logo
National Climatic Data Center
151 Patton Avenue
Asheville, NC 28801-5001
828-271-4800

The material presented here is collected and compiled by National Weather Service meteorologists at Fort Worth. This involves a variety of methods to collect information on storm events within the state of Texas. These sources include but are not limited to newspaper clippings, eyewitness reports, radar data, storm surveys, and storm spotter reports from amateur radio operators, law enforcement agencies, and emergency management organizations. Because of this involved process, preliminary Storm Data is posted between 60 and 90 days after the last day of the month.


When viewing this data, you will note various estimates of path length and width for tornadoes, as well as dollar estimates for damage to property and crops due to tornadoes, wind and/or hail. Please remember that it is very difficult for us to assign a dollar amount for damages, and many of these estimates are "educated guesses". At times, when it is not possible to assess an amount, a question mark (?), zero (0), or even a blank is put into this column. A zero (0) or blank does not necessarily mean no damage occurred, but rather an estimated dollar damage could not be determined, and the software used to develop these reports would not allow a question mark (?) as an entry.

 

Storm Data, in it's published form, includes a special section called 'Outstanding Storms of the Month' prepared by the Data Operations Branch of the National Climatic Data Center. This special feature includes photographs of storms and/or storm damage on especially noteworthy storms. Storm Data also includes periodic summaries, weather tables, and statistics prepared by the National Hurricane Center and the Storm Prediction Center.

Storm Data is intended to document storms and their impacts as completely as possible within the constraints of time and resources. However, due to the difficulties associated with the collection of this type of information, it is not all-inclusive. Information provided here should be considered preliminary until it is published in the official publication from the National Climatic Data Center.