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Moisture will rapidly return to the area on Sunday with scattered showers and a few thunderstorms possible by late in the day. Best rain chances will be well east of I-35 Sunday evening. No severe weather is expected on Sunday but the chances for strong to severe storms will increase Monday and Tuesday.
It will be sunny and cooler today with highs in the 50s to lower 60s. Northeast at 5 to 10 mph will become east mid to late afternoon.
Skies will become mostly cloudy Sunday. It will be warmer with a chance of showers during the afternoon. Highs will be in the 60s to lower 70s with south winds 10 to 20 mph.
There is a chance for some strong or severe storms next Monday and Tuesday with the higher potential being on Tuesday. Warm/moist Gulf air will provide fuel for showers and thunderstorms from Sunday night through Tuesday night. The highest storm chances will generally be east of I-35 with storm chances decreasing to the west. Stay tuned for forecast updates as we refine the details over the next few days.
North and Central Texas has had one of the warmest winters on record. Although official numbers for the full Winter of 2016-2017 (December 1st through February 28th) are not available yet, here are the rankings of the top 10 winters at DFW and Waco. Through February 24th (with four days of data remaining), DFW would rank #1 with an average temperature of 53.3 degrees and Waco would rank #5 with an average temperature of 53.9 degrees!
There is a SKYWARN class on Monday, February 27th, in Gatesville from 6:30 to 8:30 pm at the Gatesville Civic Center Complex. You do NOT have to be a resident of Coryell County to attend, and classes are FREE with no registration required. If you want to become a SKYWARN spotter and do your part to help the NWS Fort Worth and other local agencies and jurisdictions during severe weather, you'll definitely want to attend!

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North Texas Storm Data
prepared by the National Weather Service
in Fort Worth, TX

Preliminary Storm Data is posted between 60 and 90 days after the last day of the month.

This section of the Fort Worth National Weather Service Home Page contains unofficial information about storms that have occurred in North Texas. Material is organized by month, so readers should be  able to find the information wanted fairly quickly by simply knowing the approximate date of the event.

Storm Data is an official publication of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), part of the Department of Commerce. NOAA prepares, funds, and distributes these official documents which are available by subscription. Subscription, pricing, and ordering information is available from: NOAA Logo
National Climatic Data Center
151 Patton Avenue
Asheville, NC 28801-5001
828-271-4800

The material presented here is collected and compiled by National Weather Service meteorologists at Fort Worth. This involves a variety of methods to collect information on storm events within the state of Texas. These sources include but are not limited to newspaper clippings, eyewitness reports, radar data, storm surveys, and storm spotter reports from amateur radio operators, law enforcement agencies, and emergency management organizations. Because of this involved process, preliminary Storm Data is posted between 60 and 90 days after the last day of the month.


When viewing this data, you will note various estimates of path length and width for tornadoes, as well as dollar estimates for damage to property and crops due to tornadoes, wind and/or hail. Please remember that it is very difficult for us to assign a dollar amount for damages, and many of these estimates are "educated guesses". At times, when it is not possible to assess an amount, a question mark (?), zero (0), or even a blank is put into this column. A zero (0) or blank does not necessarily mean no damage occurred, but rather an estimated dollar damage could not be determined, and the software used to develop these reports would not allow a question mark (?) as an entry.

 

Storm Data, in it's published form, includes a special section called 'Outstanding Storms of the Month' prepared by the Data Operations Branch of the National Climatic Data Center. This special feature includes photographs of storms and/or storm damage on especially noteworthy storms. Storm Data also includes periodic summaries, weather tables, and statistics prepared by the National Hurricane Center and the Storm Prediction Center.

Storm Data is intended to document storms and their impacts as completely as possible within the constraints of time and resources. However, due to the difficulties associated with the collection of this type of information, it is not all-inclusive. Information provided here should be considered preliminary until it is published in the official publication from the National Climatic Data Center.