National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Tropical Cyclone Climatology

By: Zachary P. Sefcovic, 2012 NOAA Hollings Scholar, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, Indiana.

Eastern North Carolina has always been viewed as a particularly vulnerable area to tropical cyclones. However, not much is known about the impacts that tropical cyclones can have, specifically in the Newport/Morehead City County Warning Area. The following table was recently compiled to identify 167 tropical cyclones that have impacted eastern North Carolina since 1851. This table gives the year, date, storm name, storm number for the year, Saffir-Simpson Scale intensity, and a few details on the history of each of the 167 tropical cyclones. The storms highlighted in yellow are tropical cyclones that have made landfall and the storms highlighted in green are extratropical/post-tropical cyclones that have made landfall. Please note that these storms are listed specifically for the Newport/Morehead City County Warning Area. There are many storms that made landfall in North Carolina, but the highlighted storms reflect those that made landfall in Onslow, Carteret, Hyde, and Dare Counties.

 

Year

Date

Name/Number

Category of Impact

Storm Details

 

 

 

 

 

1851

8/24-25

4

TS

This storm brought gale force winds to the NC coast.

1852

8/27-28

1

TS

A tropical storm stayed off of the NC coast and had minimal impact in the area.

 

10/10

5

TS

A cyclone moved up the East Coast from Gulf of Mexico and impacted eastern NC.

1853

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1854

9/9

3

TS

A category 2 hurricane hit Savannah, GA and became a tropical storm inland; this storm caused higher tides along coast.

1855

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1856

8/19

3

TS

A tropical storm made landfall in Carteret County. Winds were estimated at 60mph at time of landfall.

 

9/1

5

TS

A major hurricane made landfall in Gulf of Mexico and weakened to a tropical storm inland. Water was pushed up to a half-mile inland from the sounds.

1857

9/12-13

2

Category 2

A category 2 hurricane made landfall near Cape Hatteras. This cyclone sank many ships in the region and record tides in New Bern flooded streets in town.

1858

9/15

3

TS

A category 2 hurricane stayed off of the coast and likely brought tropical storm winds and higher surf to the Outer Banks.

1859

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1860

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1861

9/27

5

Category 1

A category 1 hurricane made landfall in Onslow County.

 

11/1-11/2

8

Category 1

This tropical cyclone made landfall just before midnight in Carteret County. This hurricane sank Union ships that were ordered to blockade Confederate ports and the Confederates were able to salvage some of the wreckage.

1862

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1863

9/18

6

TS

A tropical storm made landfall in Onslow County near Swansboro.

1864

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1865

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1866

10/29

7

TS

A minimal hurricane moved by the Outer Banks and likely brought tropical storm winds to the coast.

1867

8/1

2

TS

A tropical cyclone tracked offshore the North Carolina coast bringing minimal impacts to the Outer Banks.

1868

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1869

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1870

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1871

8/29-30

4

TS

This storm passed off the coast and brought strong winds and heavy tides to the region.

 

10/6-7

7

TS

A tropical storm moved past the coast and had minimal impact in area.

1872

10/24-25

5

TS

This tropical storm made landfall near Wilmington but brought gale force winds and up to 4-8” of rain throughout eastern North Carolina.

1873

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1874

9/28

6

TS

A category 1 hurricane made landfall in Florida and again in South Carolina. Most impacts from this storm were near Wilmington, but Hatteras did report a wind (gust) of 75mph.

1875

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1876

9/17

2

Category 1

A category 1 hurricane made landfall near Wilmington. A military camp in Onslow County was destroyed; water rose up to five feet in Swan Quarter in Hyde County.

1877

9/29

5

TS

An offshore tropical storm brought gales and high seas to the area.

 

10/3

4

ET

An extra-tropical low moved through the interior of North Carolina. Impacts were felt in eastern North Carolina, specifically around the Albemarle Sound where flooding washed away bridges and wharves and ships were wrecked.

1878

10/11

8

TS

A tropical storm intensified to a hurricane off the shores of the Outer Banks. Tropical storm conditions were likely felt across the coast.

 

10/22

11

Category 2

A category 2 hurricane made landfall in Onslow County near Swansboro. A maximum wind of 100mph was recorded near Cape Lookout. Many ships were lost.

1879

8/18

2

Category 3

A major hurricane struck Carteret County near Atlantic Beach devastating the area. Many homes and businesses were destroyed. Railroad tracks were washed away and new inlets opened on the Bogue Banks. The Beaufort waterfront “just completely crumbled.”

 

10/28

7

TS

A tropical storm passed well offshore and had few impacts.

1880

9/8-9

6

Category 1

A minimal hurricane hit the western Bogue Banks in Carteret County.

1881

9/9

6

TS

A category 1 hurricane hit near Wilmington and tropical storm impacts were felt in the region.

1882

9/22

4

TS

A tropical storm made landfall near the Onslow/Carteret County Border.

 

10/12

6

TS

A category one hurricane moved well offshore of the area, but brought heavy rain and winds to the coastal areas.

1883

9/11

3

Category 1

A hurricane made landfall on the NC/SC Border, bringing category 1 hurricane impacts to the western counties of the MHX area of responsibility. Many vessels sank between Wilmington and Hatteras.

1884

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1885

8/25

2

Category 1

A major hurricane made landfall on the SC/GA border and curved east over NC and exited into the Atlantic through the Outer Banks. It is noted that there was considerable damage in Morehead City, likely from minimal hurricane force winds in eastern North Carolina.

 

10/2

6

TS

A category 1 hurricane dissipated off the North Carolina coast. Impacts were likely to have been minimal tropical storm force.

 

10/12

8

TS

A tropical storm made landfall on the Gulf coast of Florida and stayed inland through the Carolinas. This storm brought strong easterly winds which brought some slight flooding to New Bern and wrecked a schooner in Hatteras.

1886

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1887

8/20

6

Category 1

A strong category 3 storm passed by the coast of the Outer Banks, but brought category 1 impacts in the area. An 82mph wind gust was reported in Hatteras. Many ships were lost and several homes were washed away in the Pamlico Sound area.

 

8/24

7

TS

A few days later, another category 3 storm moved north well offshore of the Outer Banks. This storm brought tropical storm winds to the region.

 

10/20

13

TD

A category 1 hurricane made landfall on the gulf coast of Florida and followed the Appalachian Mountains inland weakening to a tropical depression over eastern North Carolina.

 

10/31

16

TS

After making landfall in Florida and crossing the state into the Atlantic, a tropical storm made its way up the eastern seaboard and knocked down telegraph poles in the Outer Banks. A 70 mph wind was recorded in Kitty Hawk.

1888

9/25

6

TS

A tropical storm formed near Miami and moved northeast passing the Carolina coast and making landfall in Massachusetts as a category 1 hurricane.

 

10/11

7

TS

A category 2 hurricane hit Florida and moved rapidly towards North Carolina impacting the area as a tropical storm.

 

11/25

9

TS

A category 2 hurricane curved past the coast bringing tropical storm force winds into the area. 66mph winds were recorded near Hatteras and shipping vessels sank off of the Outer Banks.

1889

6/18

2

TS

A tropical storm passed well offshore and brought minimal impacts into the area.

1890

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1891

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1892

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1893

6/17

1

TS

A tropical storm at landfall in Florida, this storm remained inland and brought light winds to the region.

 

8/23

4

TS

A strong category 3 hurricane moved well offshore of the Outer Banks of North Carolina, but only brought tropical storm force winds to the area with 70 mph winds reported in Kitty Hawk and 60 mph winds in Hatteras.

 

10/4

10

TS

Once a mighty major hurricane at landfall in Louisiana, this storm remained inland and brought minimal impacts.

 

10/23

11

TS

A tropical storm made landfall near Hatteras and moved north to Washington D.C. 60mph winds were recorded in Kitty Hawk and schooners sank near Ocracoke.

 

11/8

12

TS

This storm stayed offshore and moved out to sea causing minimal impacts.

1894

9/28

4

TS

After weakening from a landfall in the Caribbean as a category 3 hurricane and a tropical storm in Florida, this storm eventually set its sights on the Carolina Coast making landfall as a tropical storm in Atlantic Beach.

 

10/10

5

TS

A category 3 hurricane made landfall near Panama City, Florida and stayed inland weakening to a tropical storm over the area. Winds of 58 mph were recorded in both Kitty Hawk and Hatteras.

1895

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1896

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1897

9/23

3

TS

A tropical storm made landfall near Hatteras with the highest reported wind of 50mph. There was also high water reported in New Bern.

 

10/20

5

TS

A tropical storm narrowly missed landfall in the Outer Banks. 44mph winds were felt in Hatteras. Heavy rain fell throughout the region causing minor flooding.

 

10/24-26

6

TS

A tropical storm made a large loop around the Outer Banks, making landfall near Kill Devil Hills and moved south into the Pamlico Sound and striking land again near Buxton.

1898

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1899

8/16-18

“The San Ciriaco Hurricane”(3)

Category 3

A category 3 hurricane made landfall just west of Hatteras in the Outer Banks and then struck the mainland briefly before curving back out to sea. This storm produced significant storm surge flooding from both the sounds and the Atlantic Ocean as this storm had a unique path through the region. Many homes were swept away. Many large vessels sank. The Diamond Shoals Lightship was driven ashore as its mooring lines were broken. Significant damage was found throughout the area.

 

10/6

6

ET

An extra-tropical low passed off of the shores of the Outer Banks.

 

10/30-31

8

TS

A category 2 hurricane hit near the Myrtle Beach, SC area and moved north. In eastern North Carolina, strong tropical storm winds were felt with 72 mph winds in Kitty Hawk and 40 mph winds inland.

1900

10/13

6

ET

An extra-tropical low made landfall in Carteret County and moved parallel with the Outer Banks as it moved out to sea.

1901

7/11

3

Category 1

A category 1 hurricane made landfall near Kill Devil Hills and moved west into the mainland of North Carolina. This storm eventually moved south into the Pamlico Sound and into Carteret County where it exited back into the Atlantic Ocean and then struck Wilmington. Hatteras reported a 62mph wind.

 

9/18

7

TS

Once a category 1 hurricane in the Caribbean Sea, this long tracked tropical storm skirted past the Carolina coast as it made its extra-tropical transition.

1902

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1903

9/15

4

TS

A category 2 hurricane passed well offshore of the Outer Banks of North Carolina but brought strong tropical storm force winds to Kitty Hawk and Hatteras in the Outer Banks.

1904

9/14

2

TS

A category 1 hurricane made landfall in South Carolina and moved north in North Carolina. As this storm weakened, it dropped a few tornadoes in Duplin County and large amounts of rain that caused the Neuse River to flood.

1905

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1906

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1907

6/29

1

ET

An extra-tropical low made landfall in the Wilmington area and moved into the MHX area of responsibility.

1908

5/29

2

Category 1

This hurricane tracked up the East Coast and narrowly missed the Outer Banks.

 

7/31

3

Category 1

A tropical storm spun around the Bahamas before moving north and gaining strength, becoming a category 1 hurricane. Eventually, this storm made landfall in western Carteret County. Heavy rain fell throughout the region with 9+” of rainfall in many coastal plain areas. Hatteras recorded winds at 58mph.

 

9/1

5

TS

A tropical storm missed a landfall in Hatteras and caused above-average tides.

1909

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1910

8/28

1

ET

An extra-tropical low made landfall on Ocracoke Island; minimal effects on area

 

10/20

5

TS

Formerly a powerful category 4 hurricane, a tropical storm made landfall near Cape Lookout; however, no tropical storm wind speeds were recorded.

1911

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1912

6/14-15

1

ET

An extra-tropical low traversed the state from the Smoky Mountains to the Outer Banks and had minimal effects overall.

1913

9/2-3

4

Category 1

A category 1 hurricane made landfall in the Core Banks and moved west into Beaufort and Morehead City. Heavy rain flooded eastern North Carolina with 9-10’ water rises in New Bern and Washington. Significant crop damage occurred throughout the region.

1914

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1915

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1916

5/16

1

TS

A tropical storm that made landfall in Florida stayed inland and rain and light winds to the area.

 

9/6

9

TS

A tropical cyclone made landfall on the NC/SC border and lashed the area with tropical storm conditions.

1917

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1918

8/24

3

Category 1

A tropical storm formed and strengthened to a category 1 hurricane right before making landfall west of Atlantic Beach in Carteret County.

1919

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1920

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1921

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1922

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1923

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1924

8/25

5

Category 1

A category two hurricane skirted off of the shores of North Carolina. Hatteras reported a wind of 74 mph. There were two drowning deaths reported in the storm and Ocracoke was flooded with water.

 

9/17

8

ET

Once a category one hurricane, an extra-tropical low made landfall near Cape Lookout bringing minimal impacts.

1925

12/2

4

ET

The latest ever landfalling tropical system for the area was an extra-tropical low that hit near Beaufort. Hatteras reported winds of 62 mph with this storm.

1926

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1927

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1928

9/18-19

4

TS

Once a category 5 hurricane in Puerto Rico, this tropical storm hit Florida and followed the coast into eastern North Carolina where heavy rain and flooding occurred.

1929

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1930

9/12

“The Santo Domingo Hurricane” (2)

Category 1

A category one hurricane, which once caused devastation as a category four storm in the Dominican Republic, passes off the shores of North Carolina. Hatteras reported maximum winds at 60mph and ships off of Diamond Shoals reported hurricane force winds. Minor wind damage and higher tides occurred.

1931

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1932

9/15-16

5

ET

A tropical storm moved across Florida and followed the Eastern Seaboard northward impacting coastal areas as a tropical storm transitioning to an extra-tropical low.

1933

8/22-23

8

Category 2

A category two hurricane made landfall near Cape Hatteras. Maximum recorded winds were reported at 64 mph, but severe gales and high tides ravaged eastern North Carolina.

 

9/15-16

13

Category 3

A category three hurricane made landfall on Ocracoke Island. The maximum recorded wind velocity was 92mph at Hatteras but the winds were so strong that they blew the anemometer away. Estimated winds at New Bern and Beaufort are 125mph. Water flooded New Bern. 13” of rain fell in the Outer Banks. 21 lives were lost and damage totaled to over $3 Million.

1934

9/8

6

Category 1

A category 1 hurricane passed offshore of North Carolina. Hatteras reported winds of 65 mph and 10” of rain fell in Beaufort.

1935

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1936

9/17-18

13

Category 1

A category 2 hurricane just missed landfall in the Outer Banks. 90 mph winds were recorded in Manteo and 80 mph winds were recorded in Hatteras. Many crops were lost in coastal regions due to flooding. 35 feet of beach was eroded away in Nags Head. There were two deaths associated with this storm.

1937

7/31

1

TS

A tropical storm passed well offshore and had minimal impacts in the area.

1938

10/24

7

ET

An extra-tropical low made landfall in Carteret County.

1939

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1940

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1941

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1942

10/12

9

ET

An extra-tropical low made landfall on Ocracoke Island.

1943

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1944

9/14

“The Great Atlantic Hurricane” (7)

Category 2

A strong hurricane stayed off of the North Carolina coast but largely impacted the region. Winds gusted up to 100 mph in Hatteras. Structural and crop damage totaled almost a one and half-million dollars. Most notable damage was in Nags Head. This storm sank two American Coast Guard cutters while protecting ships from German U-Boats in World War 2.

1945

6/26

1

TS

A tropical storm made landfall in eastern Carteret County.

1946

7/6

1

TS

A tropical storm made landfall in the Wilmington area. However, this storm brought heavy rain over the entire region, as far away as Manteo.

 

10/9

3

ET

An extra-tropical low moved from the mountains to the coast and moved out to the Atlantic Ocean.

1947

9/24

6

ET

An extra-tropical low affected the western counties of the MHX area before dissipating over land.

 

10/14

8

TS

A minimal category 1 hurricane made a sharp turn to the west and made landfall in Georgia. The storm surge from this hurricane carried well up the coast to North Carolina where there was flooding in low-level coastal regions, including Morehead City.

1948

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1949

8/24

1

Category 1

A category one hurricane passed very close to the Outer Banks, moving directly over Diamond Shoals. 73mph winds were felt in Hatteras. There were two deaths in the area and $50,000 in damage in Buxton.

1950

8/20

Able (1)

TS

Hurricane Able passed well offshore of the Outer Banks as a category 4 hurricane, but gave minimal tropical storm conditions to the region.

1951

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1952

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1953

8/13-14

Barbara (2)

Category 1

Barbara made landfall on Ocracoke Island as a category 1 storm. Winds gusted to 90mph in Hatteras and Ocracoke. Property damage was estimated at $100,000 and crop damage was estimated to over a million dollars.

 

9/27

Florence (8)

ET

The extra-tropical low that was once Hurricane Florence moved off of the North Carolina coast and brought rain and wind to the region.

1954

8/30

Carol (3)

Category 2

Hurricane Carol narrowly missed landfall on Cape Hatteras by just a matter of miles. Hatteras was battered with 100 mph winds while tropical storm force winds were reported at Cherry Point. 1,000 feet of highway was undermined in the Outer Banks by high tides.

 

9/10

Edna (5)

Category 2

Following a path similar to Carol, Hurricane Edna was an intense major hurricane that passed about 60 miles east of Cape Hatteras. Highest winds were 75 mph in Hatteras. Again, highway was washed away in the Outer Banks.

 

10/15

Hazel (9)

Category 3

Hurricane Hazel crashed into the NC/SC border with category 4 strength, completely devastating the coastline west of Cape Fear. Hazel brought recorded gusts of 120 mph to Faison and Kinston. Hazel hit land during the highest tide of the year and brought devastating storm surge to Onslow and Carteret Counties, washing out highways and bridges in Snead’s Ferry, Morehead City, Atlantic Beach, and Beaufort. Many water front homes and businesses were flooded out in Carteret County.

1955

8/12

Connie (2)

Category 2

Hurricane Connie made landfall in eastern Carteret County as a category 2 hurricane. 75 mph winds were recorded at Fort Macon with winds gusting to 100 mph. Connie brought very high tides to the coast and heavy rains to most of eastern North Carolina with almost a foot of rain recorded in Morehead City. Flooding was widespread and beach erosion was significant.

 

8/17

Diane (3)

TS

Although Hurricane Diane was weaker than Connie, Diane offered a second punch to the eastern North Carolina area as it made landfall in Carolina Beach five days after Connie. Diane struck at high tide and hit at angle which pushed water inland from the ocean and sounds. Business districts were flooded in New Bern, Washington, Belhaven, Morehead City, and Beaufort, as the area had been saturated the last week. Although winds in eastern North Carolina never gusted above tropical storm strength, because of its timing, Diane may be one of the most destructive hurricanes in history.

 

9/19

Ione (9)

Category 2

Hurricane Ione made landfall right over Atlantic Beach and Morehead City in Carteret County. Ione essentially finished the job that Connie and Diane had started just a month ago. Ione flooded many of the towns in eastern North Carolina including New Bern, Washington, Belhaven, Aurora, and Kinston. Seven people died during the storm: five due to drowning and two due to automobile incidents. Damage was estimated at $88 million with most of the losses in the agricultural sector.

1956

9/26-27

Flossy (7)

ET

Hurricane Flossy made landfall on the gulf coast and stayed inland weakening to an extra-tropical low.

1957

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1958

9/27

Helene (8)

Category 3

Briefly an offshore category 4 hurricane, Hurricane Helene brought winds of category 3 intensity along the Carolina Coast. However, the hurricane made its approach during low tide, and thus, the water impact was low, and the storm moved through the area rather quickly bringing low rainfall totals. An estimate of $11 Million in damage occurred.

1959

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1960

7/29

Brenda (3)

TS

Tropical storm Brenda was a weak tropical system that just added to the rain and devastation of the 1950s. Heavy rain fell throughout the region and winds gusted up to 62 mph in the area.

 

9/12

Donna (5)

Category 2

After completely destroying southern Florida as a category 4 storm, Hurricane Donna set its sights on the North Carolina coast, making landfall as a category 2 storm in Onslow County near Topsail Island. The worst damage from Donna occurred in Carteret County in Atlantic Beach, Morehead City, and Beaufort. The Morehead City-Beaufort Causeway was completely destroyed by overwash. Damage occurred throughout eastern North Carolina. Kinston, Greenville, Swansboro, New Bern, Washington, Manteo, and Nags Head all felt the wrath of Donna. Donna had all of the elements of a worst-case scenario hurricane, strong winds, heavy flooding, widespread storm surge, and a southwest approach to the North Carolina coast. Damage was over half a billion dollars for the United States.

1961

9/14

6

TD

A tropical depression hit near Wilmington and moved into the region.

 

9/20

Esther (5)

TS

Hurricane Esther was a powerful tropical cyclone that stayed well offshore. Esther brought very little rain and wind to the region but brought higher tides to the North Carolina coast that flooded the Outer Banks highway and caused some beach erosion in the Outer Banks.

1962

8/28

Alma (1)

TS

This storm moved by the Outer Banks and strengthened as it moved up the east coast. Minimal impacts were likely felt with this storm.

1963

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1964

8/30-9/1

Cleo (5)

TD

This storm was once a major hurricane in the Caribbean and moved into the southeastern US. As it entered South Carolina, the storm made a hard turn east and traversed the entire state of North Carolina. Most impacts in this area were heavy rain, flooding, and crop damage.

 

9/13

Dora (6)

TS

Making a unique path through the Southeast US, this storm eventually hit the area. Tropical storm conditions were felt including heavy rain, beach erosion, and flooding on the Outer Banks highway.

 

10/16

Isbell (11)

Category 1

Hurricane Isbell made landfall near Morehead City as a category 1 hurricane. Isbell quickly made the transition to an extra-tropical low as it moved across eastern North Carolina. Winds were minimal category 1 near landfall, rains were generally light, and little damage occurred with this storm.

1965

6/16

1

ET

An extra-tropical low moved through the region bringing minimal impacts.

1966

6/11-12

Alma (1)

TS

Hurricane Alma made landfall on the Gulf Coast of Florida as a category 1 storm. Alma moved across land and back into the Atlantic where it remained well off of the North Carolina coast. Tropical storm force gusts were felt on land and tides ran about five feet above normal.

1967

9/16-17

Doria (4)

TS

Hurricane Doria made a loop off of the North Carolina coast before making landfall as a tropical storm in the tidewater of Virginia and moved south into the area. Rising water levels in the sounds were the largest impact.

1968

6/10-13

Abby (1)

TD

A tropical depression wandered over North Carolina for days before exiting into the Atlantic; however, the storm made a sharp turn and ended up making landfall in Onslow County as a tropical depression.

 

10/19-20

Gladys (8)

Category 1

One of the most beneficial storms in the state’s history, Hurricane Gladys passed offshore as a category 1 hurricane causing hurricane force gusts in the Outer Banks, but brought much-needed rain to the drought-ridden area of eastern North Carolina.

1969

9/9

Gerda (7)

TS

Gerda passed well off of the North Carolina coast brought slightly higher tides and light winds and rain.

1970

8/17

4

TS

A weak tropical depression made landfall in Carteret County while moving up the coast. Impacts were generally negligible.

1971

8/27

Doria (5)

TS

Tropical Storm Doria made landfall near Atlantic Beach. Winds were gusting up to 69mph at the time of landfall. The OBX had lighter gusts closer to 60mph. Heavy rain hit the entire area and widespread flooding occurred.

 

9/30

Ginger (8)

Category 1

Hurricane Ginger made landfall as a category one hurricane near Emerald Isle. Gusts were reported in Atlantic Beach as high as 92mph. Storm surge was quite significant on Pamlico Sound as seas ran 4 to 7 feet above normal. Flooding was very significant and agricultural losses reached over $10 million.

1972

6/21

Agnes (2)

TS

This storm made landfall in the Gulf coast and moved inland towards North Carolina. Agnes brought minor rainfall and wind.

1973

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1974

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1975

6/28

Amy (1)

TS

Tropical Storm Amy stalled off the North Carolina coast bringing tides two to four feet above normal causing beach erosion and flooded roadways.

 

10/26-27

Hallie (8)

TS

A tropical storm remained off of the North Carolina coast and caused slightly higher tides along the coast.

1976

8/9

Belle (3)

Category 1

As a category 3 hurricane, Belle tracked about 100 miles east of the North Carolina coast. Category 1 winds were felt in Frisco and other parts of the Outer Banks. Tides rose about three feet.

1977

9/6

Clara (3)

TD

Clara formed as a tropical depression off of the coast and moved out to sea.

1978

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1979

7/15

Bob (2)

TD

The final days of Tropical Depression Bob were spent in North Carolina as it moved north to south across the area.

 

9/5

David (4)

TS

Hurricane David hugged the southeast coast of the United States from Palm Beach, Florida to Savannah, Georgia, where it made final landfall. David was large enough where it brought tropical storm strength wind gusts to coastal North Carolina and 3-5’ tide rises.

1980

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1981

8/20

Dennis (4)

TS

Dennis made landfall as a tropical storm in western Carteret County and moved quickly out of North Carolina. 5”-10” of rain fell in eastern North Carolina.

1982

6/18-19

2

TS

A subtropical storm made landfall in Carteret County and had similar impacts as Dennis in 1981.

1983

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1984

9/9-14

Diana (5)

TS

Hurricane Diana was anticipated to hit Carteret County as a category 4 hurricane, but stalled off of the North Carolina coast near Southport. Diana made a loop in the Atlantic and weakened to a category 1 at landfall in Southport. Widespread minor damage occurred in North Carolina with the largest threat being inland flooding. There were many dam failures in North Carolina including one in Faison in Duplin County.

 

10/12-15

Josephine (11)

TS

Josephine stayed well offshore of the United States but interacted with a high-pressure system and brought extremely high tides to the Outer Banks which caused severe beach erosion and damage to marine installations.

1985

9/26-27

Gloria (7)

Category 2

Hurricane Gloria made landfall at Cape Hatteras. Diamond shoals had sustained winds of 98 mph and Cape Hatteras has sustained winds of 74 mph. One death was reported and $8 million in damage was done due to beach erosion and damaged piers. Heavy rain fell far inland.

 

11/22

Kate (11)

TS

Once a hurricane, Kate moved inland and brought minimal tropical storm impacts to the area.

1986

6/7-8

Andrew (1)

TS

Tropical Storm Andrew was a very weak tropical system; however, it caused strong rip currents on the North Carolina coast and one person drowned.

 

8/17-18

Charley (3)

Category 1

Hurricane Charley formed near the Bahamas and suddenly moved north and strengthened to a hurricane. Charley made landfall near Cape Lookout. Category 1 hurricane impacts were felt in the Outer Banks and there was one death in Manteo.

1987

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1988

8/6

Alberto (1)

TD

Alberto formed as a tropical depression right off of the North Carolina coast.

1989

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1990

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1991

8/18-19

Bob (2)

Category 2

Bob brought category 2 winds to the Outer Banks with 98 mph winds recorded at Diamond Shoals. Heavy rain pounded most of eastern North Carolina. Bob caused about $4 million in damage and one fatality in North Carolina.

1992

9/22-25

Danielle (5)

TS

Danielle swirled for a few days off of the North Carolina coast bringing storm surge up to 5.4 feet in Cape Hatteras.

1993

8/30-31

Emily (5)

Category 3

Emily was just miles from landfall in the Outer Banks but still easily brought major hurricane conditions to the area. Winds recorded were just below category 3 standards, but the worst part of Emily was the flooding. Because of the angle the Emily impacted the Outer Banks, sound-side flooding was widespread. 533 residences were deemed uninhabitable and 2 deaths were reported in Nags Head. There was $35 million in damage in the Outer Banks.

1994

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1995

6/5-7

Allison (1)

ET

The extra-tropical low of Allison dumped 4-6” of rain in eastern North Carolina.

 

8/18-20

Felix (6)

TS

Hurricane Felix was a category 1 hurricane that looped around the western Atlantic Ocean. Although it never made landfall, Felix created large swells that produced large surf and beach erosion on the Outer Banks. Highway 12 was washed out and the rip currents from the storm caused three drowning deaths in North Carolina.

 

9/9-10

Luis (12)

TS

Hurricane Luis was a powerful category 4 storm that stayed close to Bermuda when it made its impacts on North Carolina.  Luis caused 300 foot swells with 12 foot waves along the east and south facing beaches. Luis damaged many piers in Onslow and Carteret Counties and caused some overwash in the Outer Banks.

1996

6/20

Arthur (1)

TS

Arthur made landfall over Cape Lookout. 2-4” of rain fell in the area and surf was up to 5-7 feet in areas.

 

7/12

Bertha (2)

Category 2

Hurricane Bertha made landfall west of Topsail Island in the Pender/New Hanover County area as a category 2 storm. Bertha had great impact in eastern North Carolina as the right front quadrant was predominately in the area. Six feet of water pushed into Swansboro. 5-8” inches of rain and enhanced storm surge in the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds caused over seven feet of storm surge in Belhaven, Washington, and New Bern. Waterfront damage along the Atlantic coast was significant with large amounts of roads and beaches washed away. Due to the tremendous impact of Bertha, over $270 million in damage was estimated across North Carolina.

 

9/5-6

Fran (6)

Category 3

Hurricane Fran certainly finished the job that Bertha started earlier in 1996. Fran made landfall at Cape Fear as a major hurricane, but brought up to category 3 hurricane gusts to the North Carolina coast from the SC border to the Outer Banks. The right front quadrant of the hurricane fell on Pender, Onslow, and Carteret Counties, where Bertha had already washed away much of the beaches and dunes. Thus, storm surge between 8 to 13 feet destroyed many homes.  Fran brought over a foot of rain in many spots which caused many of the rivers to rise in eastern North Carolina. The Neuse River in Kinston reached a crest of 23.3 feet which caused $30 million in flooding damage in Lenoir County alone. The total damage from Fran totaled over 2 billion dollars and 21 deaths across North Carolina.

 

10/7-8

Josephine (10)

ET

As an extra-tropical low, Josephine brought flooding and strong tides to the area as the previous three storms had worn down coastal areas.

1997

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

1998

8/26-27

Bonnie (2)

Category 2

Bonnie made landfall in Pender County as a category 2 storm. 104 mph winds were recorded in Frying Pan Shoals before landfall. Bonnie brought lots of rain and produced $240 million in damage with wind and flood damage to eastern North Carolina.

1999

9/4-5

Dennis (4)

TS

Dennis made a unique path off of the North Carolina coast before making landfall on the Core Banks in eastern Carteret County. Because of the angles of this storm, Dennis caused both sound-side and Atlantic-side flooding.

 

9/16

Floyd (6)

Category 2

Hurricane Floyd hit North Carolina as a strong category 2 hurricane, making official landfall at Cape Fear and moved northeast across eastern North Carolina. Maximum sustained winds of 96 mph were recorded near Topsail Beach with gusts up to 122 mph. Floyd is noted in hurricane history for its extensive flooding and extreme rainfall. All of eastern North Carolina received 4-12” of rain; however, some localized areas received as much as 20” of rain. Flooding was widespread with Duplin, Lenoir, Greene, and Pitt counties being noted as “underwater.” Record flooding occurred on nine rivers in the state, including the Neuse River in Kinston where the old record was smashed by almost 3 feet. To the north, the Tar River crested 24 feet above flood stage. In North Carolina, the damage was over 3 billion dollars with 7000 homes destroyed, 17,000 homes uninhabitable, and 56,000 homes damaged. There were 35 deaths associated with Floyd.

 

10/17-18

Irene (9)

TS

Irene stayed offshore as a category 2 storm, but brought winds sustained at 40mph and gusting to 65mph to the beaches of North Carolina. 3-7” of rain fell throughout eastern North Carolina.

2000

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

2001

6/14-16

Allison (1)

TD

The subtropical remnants of Tropical Storm Allison hovered over eastern North Carolina bringing heavy rain to the area.

2002

7/14

Arthur (1)

TD

Arthur formed off of the coast as a tropical depression and brought few impacts.

 

9/10

Gustav (7)

TS

Tropical Storm Gustav stayed off the Carolina coast. This storm still brought 60mph sustained winds and gusts to 70mph at Diamond Shoals, Cape Hatteras Coast Guard reported at 78mph gust. Sound-side surge of 5-6’ was found in the Outer Banks and there was 3-4’ water rise at Cedar Island with 1-2’ tide rises elsewhere. $100,000 damage to property in the Outer Banks.

 

10/12

Kyle (11)

TS

Kyle moved right along the immediate North Carolina coast before dissipating over land.

2003

9/18

Isabel (9)

Category 2

Hurricane Isabel roared ashore at Drum Inlet in eastern Carteret County as a category 2 hurricane. Winds throughout the Outer Banks gusted to category 2 hurricane strength but Isabel weakened rather quickly as it raced inland. 4-8” of rain fell throughout eastern North Carolina. . Because of the angle in which Isabel hit North Carolina, water levels rose significantly along the Pamlico Sound and major ocean overwash wiped out highways, piers, and beaches in the Outer banks.

2004

8/3

Alex (1)

Category 2

At its closest approach, Alex’s center of circulation was 9 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras. At Cape Hatteras, winds were sustained at 75 mph and gusted to 102 mph. Large amounts of rain fell in the coastal areas. There was a large amount of sound-side flooding and significant beach erosion. One death in Nags Head.

 

8/13

Bonnie (2)

TD

Bonnie produced a small amount of rain as it moved through the area.

 

8/14

Charley (3)

TS

Once the formidable storm that hit Florida, Charley hit eastern North Carolina with tropical storm conditions. After making landfall near Wilmington as a category 1 hurricane, Charley brought several tornadoes, 4-6” of rain to the coastal plain and waves up to 8 feet.

2005

9/14

Ophelia (15)

Category 1

Hurricane Ophelia stayed offshore of North Carolina, but the eyewall of the storm did brush the coastlines of Carteret and Onslow Counties. However, because of Ophelia’s rather odd path, the storm stalled off the coast to dump 5-12” of rain across much of eastern North Carolina. Because of Ophelia’s unique path, sound-side flooding was extreme, especially in the Bogue Banks in Carteret County. Storm surge was also a problem in the lower parts of the Neuse and Newport Rivers with 5-9’ water rises. Damage costs due to beach erosion were in the millions.

2006

6/14

Alberto (1)

ET

The extra-tropical low that was once Alberto moved into the area.

 

8/31-9/1

Ernesto (6)

TS

Ernesto brought heavy rain to the area with 4-7” in the coastal plain and produced three tornadoes in Onslow and Carteret County. This storm also brought great storm surge into the area especially in Dare and Beaufort Counties.

2007

6/3-4

Barry (2)

ET

Formerly Tropical Storm Barry, an extra-tropical low moved off the mainland United States and hugged the coast of North Carolina, making landfall in Carteret County. Barry brought minimal impacts to the area.

 

9/9

Gabrielle (7)

TS

Tropical Storm Gabrielle made landfall at Cape Lookout as a weak tropical storm. Gabrielle was most noted for bringing up to 9” of rain to Carteret and Craven Counties and some overwash of Highway 12 in the Outer Banks.

2008

7/20

Cristobal (3)

TS

Tropical Storm Cristobal passed very close to the Outer Banks of North Carolina, but only brought light winds and some rain to the area.

 

9/6

Hanna (8)

TS

Tropical Storm Hanna made landfall on the NC/SC Border. Hanna brought significant water level rises along many communities in the Pamlico Sound.

2009

No Tropical Cyclones Reported.

2010

9/2

Earl (5)

Category 1

Hurricane Earl was a massive hurricane that stayed offshore of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Earl lashed the Outer Banks with category one force wind gusts. Earl was known for its storm surge impacts on the Outer Banks, bringing up 6 feet of sound side flooding.

2011

8/27

Irene (9)

Category 1

Hurricane Irene made landfall near Cape Lookout, North Carolina as a category 1 storm. Irene brought high tides and up to two feet of storm surge to eastern North Carolina. Irene brought plenty of rain to the area with amounts up to 15” in Pamlico and Beaufort Counties. Inland flood was extreme throughout eastern North Carolina, and several tornadoes occurred including an EF-2 in Tyrrell County near Columbia.

2012

5/30

Beryl (2)

TD

Tropical Depression Beryl affected eastern North Carolina on the morning of May 30 with 2-4” of rain and a tornado in western Carteret county.

 

10/27-30

Sandy (18)

TS

“Superstorm” Sandy affected the entire east coast of the United States. Eastern North Carolina was hit with tropical storm winds and rain totaling up to 8” in some areas of the Outer Banks. Sandy brought significant water rises to the area with large beach erosion and heavy overwash. Many parts of Highway 12 in the Outer Banks were torn apart and left the area vulnerable for nor’easters in the winter.

2013

6/6-7

Andrea (1)

TS

Tropical Storm Andrea made landfall on the Gulf Coast of Florida and remained inland until moving out into the Atlantic Ocean near the NC/VA line. Impacts were minimal throughout eastern North Carolina with rain being the largest effect from the system.

   2014       7/3-4       Arthur (1)          Category 2 Hurricane Arthur made landfall at Shackleford Banks, just west of Cape Lookout in Carteret County. Arthur was a strengthening storm as it approached the North Carolina coast, reaching category 2 strength just before landfall. The largest impact from Arthur was storm surge in the central Outer Banks. Over 5 feet of storm surge washed ashore on the sound side of Rodanthe and overwash of NC Highway 12 at the “S-Curves” near Mirlo Beach caused some transportation issues. Arthur spawned two EF-1 tornadoes, one in Duplin County and one in Martin County