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Overview

For much of the day on Wednesday, July 12th, the atmosphere was quiet. Thick cloud cover, with areas of fog across the higher terrain of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Along the Wisonsin/Michigan stateline, clouds were able to erode quicker in the late afternoon hours. With the presence of a frontal boundary, the diminishing cloud cover allowed direct heating from the late afternoon sun. This resulted in considerable instability developing across Northern Wisconsin and sharply diminishing to the north of the stateline into Michigan. The result was a forecast challenge due to the sharp gradient that existed. Below is a look at storm damage photos, and a sample of some of the atmospheric elements forecasters utilized in the warning decision making process. 

 

Environment/Meteorology:

We are still working to add this section to the report. Please check back soon, as we will have additional forecast elements and explanation as to the environmental conditions that produced the severe storms Wednesday evening. 

 

 

RAP Surface CAPE/CIN RAP Surface CAPE/CIN RAP Surface CAPE/CIN
RAP SFC CAPE/CIN 12July2017 5PM CDT RAP SFC CAPE/CIN 12July2017 6PM CDT RAP SFC CAPE/CIN 12July2017 8PM CDT

 

 

 

HRRRx Forecast Reflectivity HRRRx Forecast Reflectivity
HRRRx forecast radar reflectivity 12July2017 RAP forecast 0-1km Total Shear 12July2017

 


Other Links:

This area will continue to update with additional information about resources in regards to various items we have discussed above.
 


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