National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

The start of "Meteorological Fall" (September, October and November) started where August left off, mainly warm and dry across south central and southeast Colorado. This warm and dry pattern persisted through the middle of the September before a substantial pattern change brought cool and wet weather to south central and southeast Colorado through the end of the month. This pattern change also brought nearly a week straight of cloudy conditions to much of southeastern Colorado, with more than a couple consecutive days of cloudy conditions highly anomalous any time of the year across eastern Colorado. For the month as a whole, generally above normal temperatures and precipitation were experienced across south central and southeast Colorado, with areas of well above normal precipitation experienced across portions of southern Colorado. 

October of 2017 was a generally warm and dry month across south central and southeast Colorado, with several weather systems and associated cold fronts moving across the region through out the month. These weather systems brought big temperature swings and some light rain and snow across the region. For the month as a whole, generally above normal temperatures and below normal precipitation were experienced across south central and southeast Colorado, save for at or above normal precipitation across portions of the central mountains.  

November of 2017 was a very warm and generally dry month across south central and southeast Colorado, with a few  weather systems and associated cold fronts moving across the region through out the month. These weather systems again brought some big temperature swings, especially across the eastern plains, along with some light rain and snow across the region. For the month as a whole, well above normal temperatures and below normal precipitation were experienced across south central and southeast Colorado, save for at or above normal precipitation across portions of the central mountains.  

For the Fall of 2017 as a whole, generally above normal temperatures at to slightly below normal precipitation was experienced across South Central and Southeast Colorado, save for above normal precipitation across portions of the Central and Southeast Mountains through the far southeast Plains. The following graphics indicate seasonal temperature and precipitation departures from normal across the state through out the Fall of 2017.  

 

The preliminary average temperature for the Fall of 2017 in Alamosa was 46.5 degrees. This is 4 degrees above normal and makes the Fall of 2017, the 2nd warmest Fall on record, just below the average fall temperature of 46.9 degrees, recorded through the Fall 1933.  Alamosa recorded 1.86 inches of precipitation through out the Fall, which 0.15 inches below normal. Of note, just under 95 percent (1.75  inches) of the seasonal precipitation fell in September.  

(click here for a more detailed Fall of 2017 Climate Summary in Alamosa)

The preliminary average temperature for the Fall of 2017 in Colorado Springs was 53.0 degrees. This is 3.5 degrees above normal and makes the Fall of 2017 the 5th warmest on record in Colorado Springs.  This, however, remains well  below the average fall temperature of 56.0 degrees, recorded through the Fall of 2016. Colorado Springs recorded 3.15 inches of precipitation through out the Fall of 2017, which is 0.74 inches above normal.  Of note, 88 percent (2.77  inches) of the seasonal precipitation fell in September.  

(click here for a more detailed Fall of 2017 Climate Summary in Colorado Springs)

The preliminary average temperature for the Fall of 2017 in Pueblo was 55.1 degrees, which is 3.2 degrees above normal. Pueblo recorded 1.72 inches of precipitation through out the Fall of 2017, which is 0.24 inches below normal.   Of note, 70 percent (1.20  inches) of the seasonal precipitation fell in September.  

(click here for a more detailed Fall of 2017 Climate Summary in Pueblo)

Below is the Climate Prediction Center's (CPC) temperature and precipitation outlook for the Winter of 2017-18  (December, January and February), which indicates a better chances of above normal temperatures along with equal chances of above, below and near normal precipitation across south central and southeast Colorado.