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February 2017 & Winter 2016-17

  • Tulsa: February 2017 was the 2nd warmest (51.4°F; since 1905) and the 49th driest (1.18"; since 1888) February on record. No snow fell in February 2017, tying 18 other years with no February snow.
  • Tulsa: The mean temperature of 72°F set on February 2, 2017 is the warmest mean temperature on record for the month of February.  The previous record was 71°F on February 4, 2008.
  • Fort Smith: February 2017 was the Record warmest (54.3°F, previous record 53.0°F in 1930; since 1883) and the 57th wettest (2.48", tied 1908; since 1883) February on record.  No snow fell in February, tying with 35 other years with no February snow. 
  • Fort Smith: The maximum temperature of 88°F set on February 23, 2017 is the warmest maximum temperature on record for the month of February.  The previous record was 87°F on February 1, 1911.
  • Fayetteville: February 2017 was the Record warmest (49.0°F, previous record 47.8°F in 1976; since 1950) and the 10th driest (1.11"; since 1950) February on record.  No snow fell in February, tying 8 other years with no February snow.
  • McAlester: The mean temperature of 75°F set on February 11, 2017 is the warmest mean temperature on record for the month of February.  The previous record was 71°F on February 4, 2007 and February 13, 1962.
  • Using the radar-derived estimated observed precipitation from the RFCs, rainfall totals for February 2017 ranged from around 0.50” along the OK/KS border to around 4” in parts of southeast OK and west central AR. This corresponds to near to around 25% of the normal February rainfall north of I-40 in eastern OK and northwest AR, and 75% to around 150% of the normal rainfall south of I-40.
  • February 2017 was very warm across eastern OK and northwest AR, running 9°-10° above normal. A few rounds of rain brought above normal rain to southeast OK, while elsewhere, below normal rain continued.
  • No mainstem river flooding occurred this month.
  • According to the Drought Monitor from February 28, 2017, D3 (Extreme Drought) conditions remained over Crawford, Sebastian, and Franklin Counties in west central AR. D2 (Severe Drought) encompassed portions of Osage, Pawnee, Creek, Tulsa, Rogers, Wagoner, Cherokee, Adair, Muskogee, Okfuskee, Okmulgee, McIntosh, Pittsburg, Haskell, Sequoyah, Latimer, Le Flore, Choctaw, and Pushmataha Counties in eastern OK, and Carroll, Washington, Madison, Sebastian, Crawford, and Franklin Counties in west central AR. D1 (Moderate Drought) conditions existed over portions of Osage, Washington, Nowata, Rogers, Wagoner, Mayes, Craig, Ottawa, Delaware, Cherokee, Muskogee, Okmulgee, Okfuskee, McIntosh, Pittsburg, Latimer, Le Flore, Choctaw, and Pushmataha Counties in eastern OK and Benton and Carroll Counties in northwest AR. D0 (abnormally dry conditions but not in drought) were present across small portions of Osage, Washington, Nowata, Delaware, Craig, and Pittsburg Counties in eastern OK.
  • According to the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, the 30-day period January 30-February 28, 2017 was the 34th driest for northeast Oklahoma, the 39th wettest for east central Oklahoma, and the 48th wettest for southeast Oklahoma. Records go back to 1921.  For the Year-to-Date period Jan. 1-Feb. 28, 2017,  northeast Oklahoma ranked as the 20th wettest, east central Oklahoma was the 28th wettest, and southeast Oklahoma was the 17th wettest period.
Winter (Dec-Jan-Feb) 2016-17
  • Using the radar-derived estimated observed precipitation from the RFCs, rainfall totals for Winter 2016-17 ranged from around 2” to around 8”. This corresponds to near to 25% below the normal Winter rainfall for all except eastern Kay, western Osage and western Pawnee Counties, where Winter rainfall was 110%-150% of normal.
  • According to the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, Winter 2016-17 (December 1, 2016-February 28, 2017) was the 44th driest in northeast Oklahoma, east central Oklahoma ranked as the 38th driest, and southeast Oklahoma was the 22nd driest period.  Records go back to 1921.