National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce
Monthly Storm Reports and Storm Data
Storm Reports
Are you interested in what happened during a recent event? Check out the report below.
 
October, 2021 Storm Report
 
Monthly Statistics
 
  Temperatures Precipitation
Site Max Min Avg Norm Dep Hi Lo Sum Norm Dep
Fayetteville (NW AR) 74.2 49.8 62.0 58.0 +4.0 91 35 6.10 4.48 +1.62
Harrison (NC AR) 72.8 52.3 62.5 59.4 +3.1 88 40 5.47 3.81 +1.66
Jonesboro (NE AR) 77.2 55.5 66.4 62.2 +4.2 89 42 3.26 3.81 -0.55
Fort Smith (WC AR) 78.0 55.2 66.6 63.5 +3.1 95 41 8.90 4.42 +4.48
Little Rock (C AR) 78.0 56.6 67.3 62.6 +4.7 88 42 3.89 4.47 -0.58
Texarkana (SW AR) 82.3 60.2 71.2 64.9 +6.3 92 45 1.48 4.51 -3.03
El Dorado (SC AR) 79.9 56.6 68.2 64.6 +3.6 88 41 2.66 4.58 -1.92
Pine Bluff (SE AR) 80.1 58.0 69.0 63.7 +5.3 89 44 4.20 4.58 -0.38

 

Temperatures were above to well above average in October (by three to more than six degrees). It was wetter than usual in northwest Arkansas, and drier than normal in much of the state (especially parts of the south). 

 

Record Temperatures
 
There was only one record high temperature broken in October. Check out the record below.

 

Site Record High (Date of Occurrence)
Russellville 92 (10/09)

 

Quick Event Summary
 

Much of Arkansas saw above normal temperatures and occasional rainfall during the first half of the month with the exception of central Arkansas where a locally extreme rainfall event provided several inches of rain from Oct. 2-3. A few rounds of thunderstorms moved across the area bringing some beneficial rainfall to the state. Cooler temperatures began to occur during the second half of the month with much colder air seen just before Halloween.

 

In the picture: US Highway 67 was closed briefly during the late evening hours on October 2nd as water collected on the roadway, causing it to become impassable.  
 

Rainfall that occurred from October 2-3 was fairly spotty in nature with reports showing feast or famine depending on the location across the state. While portions of northern Pulaski and Lonoke Counties picked up around 8 inches of rain, most reporting sites across the state received less than one half inch. A few exceptions include Camden (Ouachita County) where 3.00 inches of rain occurred and Newport (Jackson County) where 2.59 inches of rain fell. 

 

 

In the picture: Several inches of rain during the evening of 10/02/2021 created dangerous driving conditions in parts of central Arkansas, with the darkness making if difficult to detect water across roads.
 

Closer to the middle of the month a couple of cold fronts moved across the state bringing the possibility of severe weather to the region. On October 10th after widespread severe weather occurred just west of the state across Oklahoma, a line of storms swept across Arkansas. No severe weather was observed and rainfall was generally less than one half inch. 

From October 13-15 as moisture streamed northeast over the region from the remnants of Pacific hurricane Pamela. With a stalled front west of the area to focus the moisture, very heavy rain fell across portions of northeast Oklahoma and western Arkansas. Fort Smith (Sebastian County) picked up the heaviest rain and recorded 6.84 inches from the 13th through the 15th. A weak (EF-1) tornado occurred from Washington to Madison County near the towns of Wyola and Combs shortly after 5 AM CDT. By the afternoon of October 15th the front began to shift east with severe weather possible from central to northeast Arkansas. As storms developed and moved east that afternoon, a weak (EF-0) tornado developed across northern Pulaski County near Jacksonville and travelled 2.5 miles before dissipating.

 

 

Temperatures as of 3 PM on October 15th ranged from the 50s across northwest Arkansas to the mid 80s across the south.
In the picture: Temperatures as of 3 PM on October 15th ranged from the 50s across northwest Arkansas to the mid 80s across the south. 
 

In the wake of the front, some of the coolest air of the season arrived across the state. Temperatures across northern parts of the state during the morning of October 17th fell into the 30s with patchy frost noted in a few locations along the Missouri border. 

 

Numerous sites across the state recorded low temperatures below 40 degrees on October 17th. The coldest spots were Jessieville and Mammoth Spring where the low was 35 degrees.
In the picture: Numerous sites across the state recorded low temperatures below 40 degrees on October 17th. The coldest spots were Jessieville and Mammoth Spring where the low was 35 degrees.
 

After rain fell across the state on the 15th a period of dry weather occurred through the 23rd. Temperatures began to warm as well before a new potent storm system and strong cold front approached the area on the 24th. This brought the potential of severe weather across the northwest half of the state as well as areas to the north.

 

Storm reports collected by the Storm Prediction Center on October 24th indicated widespread  damaging wind and tornado reports across Missouri and Illinois.
In the picture: Storm reports collected by the Storm Prediction Center on October 24th indicated widespread  damaging wind and tornado reports across Missouri and Illinois. 
 

Only two instances of severe weather were reported across northern Arkansas during the evening hours of October 24th. Quarter size hail was observed at Omaha (Boone County) and thunderstorm winds were estimated to be as strong as 70 mph near Viola (Fulton County). Across portions of Missouri two EF-3 and one EF-2 tornado occurred. Three EF-1 and three EF-0 tornadoes were reported as well.

 

 

Widespread cloud cover can be seen wrapping around a strong area of upper level low pressure. The center of low pressure was just east of Arkansas as of 1:30 PM CDT October 28th.
In the picture: Widespread cloud cover can be seen wrapping around a strong area of upper level low pressure. The center of low pressure was just east of Arkansas as of 1:30 PM CDT October 28th.
 

As Halloween approached a powerful upper level low pressure system moved from the western US eastward toward southeast portions of the country. This brought rainfall and cloudy/cool conditions to the state from October 27th through the 29th. Other than unseasonably cool temperatures, especially daytime highs on October 28th, strong northwest winds were observed across the state. Western Arkansas experienced the strongest wind gusts during the afternoon and evening hours on the 28th. 

Portions of southeast Texas, southern Louisiana and Mississippi were impacted more heavily by the storm system and cold front that moved along the Gulf Coast. 15 tornadoes were reported across these areas on October 27th with two separate tornadoes causing damage in the city of Lake Charles, Louisiana.

 

In the picture: High temperatures on October 28th were only in the 50s and lower 60s across Arkansas. Winds gusted to as high as 45 mph across western Arkansas.
 

Clouds began to depart across the state as the upper low shifted east of the area by October 30th. Sunny and warm conditions were observed during the afternoon hours on the 30th and 31st with pleasant conditions noted during the evening hours on Halloween.

 

Temperature and Precipitation Trends
 
Temperatures at Little Rock (Pulaski County).
In the picture: Temperatures at Little Rock (Pulaski County). Click to enlarge.

 

Precipitation at Little Rock (Pulaski County).
In the picture: Precipitation at Little Rock (Pulaski County). Click to enlarge.

 

Precipitation across Arkansas.
In the picture: Precipitation across Arkansas.

 

Link of Interest
Detailed Monthly Statistics