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Monthly Storm Reports and Storm Data
Storm Reports
Are you interested in what happened during a recent event? Check out the report below.
 
Rain/Isolated Severe Storms on November 22-25, 2020
 
Areas of rain surrounded a cold front pushing through Arkansas from the north at 1100 am CST on 11/22/2020. Temperatures north of the front were in the 40s, with 60s farther south.
In the picture: Areas of rain surrounded a cold front pushing through Arkansas from the north at 1100 am CST on 11/22/2020. Temperatures north of the front were in the 40s, with 60s farther south.
 

It was a very dry November through the first three weeks of the month. On the 22nd, good chances of rain were in the forecast as a cold front pushed into Arkansas from the north. Across the northern half of the state, amounts from a half inch to locally over an inch were common. There were quarter to half inch totals in the central counties, and less than a tenth of an inch in the south.

 

Sixty day departure from normal rainfall as of 600 am CST on 11/24/2020.
In the picture: Sixty day departure from normal rainfall as of 600 am CST on 11/24/2020.
 

Monthly rainfall was still two to more than three inches below average across much of the region following the event. It was a similar situation in the southwest in October. As of the morning of November 24th, drought conditions were identified from just west of Little Rock (Pulaski County) to Texarkana (Miller County).

 

Precipitation in November, 2020 (Through the 23rd)
Site Amount Normal +/- % of Normal
Fayetteville (NW AR) 1.58 3.28 -1.70 48%
Harrison (NC AR) 1.11 3.31 -2.20 34%
Jonesboro (NE AR) 1.21 3.60 -2.39 34%
Fort Smith (WC AR) 1.05 3.45 -2.40 30%
Little Rock (C AR) 0.81 3.96 -3.15 20%
West Memphis (EC AR) 1.00 3.71 -2.71 27%
Texarkana (SW AR) 0.16 3.61 -3.45 4%
El Dorado (SC AR) 0.26 3.62 -3.36 7%
Pine Bluff (SE AR) 0.46 3.61 -3.15 13%

 

A large storm system ("L") aloft (at 500 millibars/18,000 feet) was over the middle of the country at 600 am CST on 11/25/2020. Another system was over the Pacific Northwest, and headed toward Arkansas.
In the picture: A large storm system ("L") aloft (at 500 millibars/18,000 feet) was over the middle of the country at 600 am CST on 11/25/2020. Another system was over the Pacific Northwest, and headed toward Arkansas.
 

More relief was coming on the 24th/25th. A large storm system barreled into the middle of the country from the Rockies, and triggered scattered to numerous showers and thunderstorms.

 

The WSR-88D (Doppler Weather Radar) showed scattered precipitation ahead of a line of showers and thunderstorms that swept from western into central Arkansas from 1039 pm CST on 11/24/2020 to 101 am CST the next morning.
Radar at 1039 pm CST (11/24)  |  Radar at 1105 pm CST (11/24)
Radar at 1135 pm CST (11/24)  |  Radar at 1201 am CST (11/25)
Radar at 1229 am CST (11/25)  |  Radar at 101 am CST (11/25)
Loop
In the pictures: The WSR-88D (Doppler Weather Radar) showed scattered precipitation ahead of a line of showers and thunderstorms that swept from western into central Arkansas from 1039 pm CST on 11/24/2020 to 101 am CST the next morning.
 

Hit and miss precipitation popped up during the evening of the 24th, mainly from western into central Arkansas. That was followed by a line of showers and storms from the late evening into the predawn hours of the 25th.

 

It was dry (dewpoints in the 30s) in northeast Arkansas at 300 pm CST on 11/24/2020. Moisture was increasing (dewpoints in the 50s) in southern/western sections of the state.
In the picture: It was dry (dewpoints in the 30s) in northeast Arkansas at 300 pm CST on 11/24/2020. Moisture was increasing (dewpoints in the 50s) in southern/western sections of the state.
 

There was some concern for severe weather, especially with the line of storms. Wind energy was impressive around the aforementioned system. This gave storms a fast forward speed, and this usually increases the chances of strong to damaging winds. Winds also turned with height, with the possibility of a tornado or two. However, the atmosphere was not exactly unstable (warm/moist). Temperatures were only in the 50s/60s, and dewpoints struggled to get into the 50s. This limited the amount of severe weather that occurred.

Statewide, there were only two reports of wind damage. Trees and power lines were downed just north of Plainview (Yell County). Trees were also toppled a mile west-northwest of Potter (Polk County), and there was minor structural damage as well.

 

Severe weather reports in the twenty four hour period ending at 600 am CST on 11/25/2020. The graphic is courtesy of the Storm Prediction Center.
In the picture: Severe weather reports in the twenty four hour period ending at 600 am CST on 11/25/2020. The graphic is courtesy of the Storm Prediction Center.
 

Damaging winds, hail, and a few tornadoes were reported from southern Kansas to northern Texas and northwest Louisiana where a more unstable environment existed. Just before 900 pm CST on the 24th, a tornado (rated EF2) tore through Arlington, TX, damaging or destroying several buildings. Roofs were compromised at three apartment complexes, and seventy five families were displaced. At least five injuries resulted. Two other weak tornadoes (rated EF1) hit Haskell and LeFlore Counties in eastern Oklahoma.

 

Twenty four hour rainfall through 600 am CST on 11/25/2020.
In the picture: Twenty four hour rainfall through 600 am CST on 11/25/2020.
 

Here at home, a half inch to an inch and a half of rain dumped in the twenty four hour period ending at 600 am CST on the 25th. Newport (Jackson County) got 1.46 inches, with 1.45 inches at Paragould (Greene County), 1.20 inches at Alicia (Lawrence County), 1.09 inches at Cabot (Lonoke County), 1.08 inches at Big Fork (Polk County), Parks (Scott County), and Pocahontas (Randolph County), and 1.03 inches at Jonesboro (Craighead County).

 

In the picture: Only five days remained in the 2020 hurricane season as of 11/25/2020. There were a record-breaking thirty named storms in the Atlantic basin.
 

As of the 25th, there were only a few days left in the 2020 hurricane season (ending on the 30th). While it was quiet in the Atlantic basin (after the demise of Iota in El Salvador on the 18th), a staggering thirty named storms were counted since mid-May. It was the busiest season on record, topping the twenty eight named storms documented in 2005.

 

Storm Reports
Preliminary reports of severe weather in the Little Rock County Warning Area on November 24, 2020 (in red).
Submit a storm report.
There were isolated reports of wind damage in western Arkansas late on November 24th. For a look at the reports, click here.
 
Link of Interest
Plot Reports
In the picture: Preliminary reports of severe weather in the Little Rock County Warning Area on November 24, 2020 (in red).