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Western Heat Wave Continues; Watching the Gulf of Mexico

A dangerous heat wave will continue to bring record temperatures to much of the West through this week. A tropical disturbance in the southwest Gulf of Mexico will likely form into a tropical depression late this week over the central or northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Heavy rain could begin to impact portions of the northern Gulf Coast on Friday. Read More >

NWS Norman Skywarn Program
About Skywarn Training Schedule Become a Spotter Submit Report Training Resources

Steps to Becoming A Skywarn Spotter:

The National Weather Service encourages anyone with an interest in public service and access to communication, such as amateur radio, to participate as a Skywarn storm spotter. Volunteers include police and fire personnel, dispatchers, EMS workers, public utility workers and other concerned private citizens. Individuals affiliated with hospitals, schools, churches, nursing homes or who have a responsibility for protecting others are also encouraged to become a spotter.
 

  1. Complete the 2 Online National Skywarn Training Modules.
    The courses are “The Role of the Skywarn Spotter” and “Skywarn Spotter Convective Basics”. The courses will require you to register with the Meted Training Site.
  2. Review our basic spotter training modules.
    They are available on our YouTube Spotter Training playlist.
  3. Participate in one of our spotter training webinars
    or attend one of our regional training sessions in your area. Check our latest training schedule for dates and locations.
  4. Register with Spotter Network.
    This is not required, but Spotter Network gives you additional training and other methods for contacting us.
  5. For information about joining a local spotter network, contact your local Emergency Management office.
    Your local and county officials can provide additional information about how spotter groups are organized in your community. Many spotter groups in the small communities in central/western Oklahoma and western north Texas are led by local volunteer firefighters with assistance from law enforcement, amateur radio operators, and other community volunteers such as CERT volunteers.