National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Meteorological Winter of 2017-18 (December-February) started out where Fall left out, with December of 2017 coming in as a warm and dry month across south central and southeast Colorado. A few  weather systems and associated cold fronts did move across the region through out the month, bringing  some big temperature swings, especially across the eastern plains, along with some light snow across the region. For the month December as a whole, above to well above normal temperatures and below normal precipitation were experienced across south central and southeast Colorado, save for at or above normal precipitation across portions of the Central Mountains.  

New Year's Day of 2018 started out on the chilly side, especially across southeastern Colorado, however the rest of January of 2018 followed an all too familiar pattern of the previous few months; namely warm and dry across much of South Central and Southeast Colorado. A few weather systems and associated cold fronts did move across the region through out the month, bringing a few big temperature swings, especially across the Eastern Plains, along with some generally light snow across the region.  However, for the month January as a whole, above to well above normal temperatures and below normal precipitation were experienced across South Central and Southeast Colorado, save for at or above normal precipitation across portions of the Central Mountains and a few spotty locales across the Southeast Plains.   

A pattern change early in the month of February, in which the persistent upper ridge across the West Coast broke down, allowing for several Pacific weather systems to move across the state through out the month. The moderate to strong and moist westerly flow aloft helped to bring some much needed precipitation to areas along the Continental Divide, especially for the Southwest Mountains, which saw above normal precipitation for the month for the first time since September of 2017. However, the far southeast plains did not far as well, with below to well below average precipitation experienced through out February of 2018. 

For the Winter as a whole,  above to well above normal temperatures and below to well below normal precipitation was experienced across South Central Colorado, save for near normal precipitation across portions of the Central Mountains.  Southeast Colorado experienced generally above normal temperatures, save for portions of the far southeast plains which saw at to slightly below normal temperatures for the Winter, along with generally below normal precipitation. The following graphics indicate seasonal temperature and precipitation departures from normal across the state through out the Winter of 2017-18

.  

 

The preliminary average temperature for the Winter of 2017-18 in Alamosa was 25.9 F. This is 6.9 degrees above normal and makes the Winter of 2017-18 the 2nd warmest Winter on record, just behind record average Winter temperature of 26.4F recorded through out the Winter of 1994-95.  Alamosa recorded 0.45 inches of precipitation through out the Winter, which is 0.42 inches below normal. Alamosa tallied 6.5 inches of snow through out the Winter, which is 6.3 inches below normal. 

(click here for a more detailed Fall of 2017 Climate Summary in Alamosa)

The preliminary average temperature for the of Winter of 2017-18 in Colorado Springs was 33.4 F, which is 2.6 degrees above normal. Colorado Springs recorded 0.57 inches of precipitation through out the Winter, which is 0.43 inches below normal. Colorado Springs tallied 11.6 inches of snow through out the Winter, which is 4.6 inches below normal. (Of note, 9 inches out of the 11.6 inches of the winter snowfall came in the month of February.)

(click here for a more detailed Fall of 2017 Climate Summary in Colorado Springs)

The preliminary average temperature for the Winter of 2017-18 in Pueblo was 33.7 F, which is 2.2 degrees above normal.  Pueblo recorded 0.82 inches of precipitation through out the Winter, which is 0.21 inches below normal. Pueblo tallied 12.3 inches of snow through out the Winter, which is 3.5 inches below normal. (Of note, 10.5 inches out of the 12.3 inches of the winter snowfall came in the month of February.)

(click here for a more detailed Fall of 2017 Climate Summary in Pueblo)

Below is the Climate Prediction Center's (CPC) temperature and precipitation outlook for the Spring of 2018  (March, April and May), which indicates a better chance for above normal temperatures and below normal precipitation across the South Central and Southeast Colorado.