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Social Media: Hurricanes
#HurricanePrep #HurricaneStrong #WeatherReady

 

Please help the National Weather Service spread these important safety messages on social media! Everyone is welcome to use the text and images provided below to help the NWS build a Weather-Ready Nation.

After the Storm: Cleaning Up

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Be careful when cleaning up after a hurricane. Cleanup slowly, taking lots of breaks to avoid straining your body. Be very careful with chainsaws and other power tools. Make sure to stay safe in the heat by staying hydrated, taking breaks in the shade or AC. weather.gov/safety/hurricane-after

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Be careful when cleaning up after a hurricane. Cleanup slowly, taking lots of breaks to avoid straining your body. Be very careful with chainsaws and other power tools. Make sure to stay safe in the heat by staying hydrated, taking breaks in the shade or AC. weather.gov/safety/hurricane-after

After The Storm: Cleaning Up. 1) Don't push yourself. Straining the body can lead to heart attacks and other serious issues. Perform cleanups slowly, taking lots of breaks. 2) Be careful with chainsaws. Wear protective gear. Keep a safe distance from bystanders. Avoid contact with fallen power lines to prevent electric shock. If you aren't trained to use them, leave power tools to the experts.

 

After the Storm: Hazards Remain

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Hurricane dangers remain ever after the skies turn blue. Watch out for downed power lines and damaged buildings. Avoid floodwaters as they can hide a variety of dangers, and never drive through them, as it doesn’t take much to sweep your car away.
weather.gov/safety/hurricane-after

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Hurricane dangers remain ever after the skies turn blue. Watch out for downed power lines and damaged buildings. Avoid floodwaters as they can hide a variety of dangers, and never drive through them, as it doesn’t take much to sweep your car away.
weather.gov/safety/hurricane-after

After The Storm: Hazards Remain. 1) Be careful near damaged buildings. Do not enter a damaged building until local authorities say it's afe. Leave your home if there's shifting or unusual noises. If you smell gas, get outdoors immediately and call 911. 2) Watch out for power lines. Stay far away from damaged power lines, whether they've fallen to the ground or are dangling overheard. 3) Don't walk or drive through floodwaters. They can contain harmful bacteria, chemicals, sharp objects, live wires and reptiles/other animals. It only takes 12 inches of fast-moving water to sweep a car away.

 

After the Storm: Power Outage

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Even after the storm passes, power outages have their own set of hazards. Be especially careful with generators — never use them inside or in garages to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Use flashlights, not candles, to avoid risk of fire. weather.gov/safety/hurricane-after

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Even after the storm passes, power outages have their own set of hazards. Be especially careful with generators — never use them inside or in garages to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Use flashlights, not candles, to avoid risk of fire. weather.gov/safety/hurricane-after

After The Storm: Power Outage. 1) Use flashlights, not candles. This will avoid risk of fire. Turn on flashlights before entering buildings to avoid producing a spark that could ignite leaking gas. 2) Practice portable generator safety. Use outdoors, at least 20 feet away from doors/windows/garages to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Properly ground, and don't overload. 3) Be careful with food and water. Food in the fridge can start to spoil after as little as 4 hours. Drink bottled/boiled water only, as purification systems may not be working. Use camp stoves/grills outdoors only.

 

Storm Surge Watch vs. Warning

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Do you know the difference between a Storm Surge Warning and a Storm Surge Watch? A Storm Surge Warning means there is a danger of life-threatening flooding within the next 36 hours. A Storm Surge Watch means there is a possibility of life-threatening flooding within the next 48 hours. In either case, please promptly follow evacuation and other instructions from local officials. Visit weather.gov/hurricanesafety for more hurricane safety tips.

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Do you know the difference between a Storm Surge Warning and Watch? Visit weather.gov/hurricanesafety for more tips.

A storm surge watch is issued when storm surge is possible. A storm surge warning is issued when storm surge is expected. In either case, promptly follow evacuation and other instructions from local officials.

 

Hurricanes can escalate quickly

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Did you know that the Category 5 hurricanes that have struck the United States were much weaker tropical storms just 72 hours prior? Storms can intensify surprisingly quickly — stay Weather-Ready by being prepared well ahead of time. weather.gov/wrn/hurricane-preparedness

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Did you know that the Category 5 hurricanes that have struck the United States were much weaker tropical storms just 72 hours prior? Storms can intensify surprisingly quickly — stay #WeatherReady by being prepared well ahead of time. weather.gov/wrn/hurricane-preparedness

Hurricanes can escalate quickly. Category 5 hurricanes that struck the United States were much weaker tropical storms just 72 hours prior. Be prepared, well ahead of the storm. Know your potential evacuation routes. Have an emergency supply kit ready to go. Get an insurance checkup and strengthen your home. Have a family communication plan.

 

Hurricanes Watch vs Warning

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A Hurricane WATCH is when hurricane force winds are POSSIBLE.
A Hurricane WARNING is when they are EXPECTED.
Know the difference and stay Weather-Ready! weather.gov/safety/hurricane-ww

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A Hurricane WATCH is when hurricane force winds are POSSIBLE.
A Hurricane WARNING is when they are EXPECTED.
Know the difference and stay #WeatherReady weather.gov/safety/hurricane-ww

A Hurricane Watch is issued when hurricane force winds are possible. Prepare your home by boarding up windows and moving loose items indoors. Have an emergency supply kit ready. A Hurricane Warning is issued when hurricane force winds are expected. Seek shelter in a sturdy structure or evacuate if ordered.

 

Determine Your Risk

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The threats from hurricanes to you and your family can vary widely depending on where you live. It’s not just those along the coast that can experience significant, life-threatening impacts. Evaluate what you need to do to protect your home and family NOW, before the storms.
hurricanes.gov/prepare

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It’s not just those along the coast that can experience significant, life-threatening impacts. Evaluate what you need to do to protect your home and family NOW, before the storms. hurricanes.gov/prepare #HurricanePrep #WeatherReady

Hurricane Preparedness: Determine Your Risk. Hurricanes bring many hazards to U.S. coastlines and inland areas, including storm surge along the coast, inland flooding due to heavy rainfall, tornadoes, strong wind, rip currents and large waves.

 

Develop Your Evacuation Plan

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Take some time to make sure you have a hurricane evacuation plan. The first thing you need to do is find out if you live in a storm surge hurricane evacuation zone or if you’re in a home that would be unsafe during a hurricane. If you are, figure out where you’d go and how you’d get there if told to evacuate. You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Identify someone, perhaps a friend or relative who doesn’t live in an evacuation zone or unsafe home, and coordinate with them to use their home as your evacuation destination. Be sure to account for your pets, as most local shelters do not permit them. Put the plan in writing for you and those you care about.
hurricanes.gov/prepare

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Are you in a hurricane evacuation zone, or in a home that would be otherwise unsafe in a hurricane? If so, think now, about where you’d go and how you’d get there if you're told to evacuate. hurricanes.gov/prepare #HurricanePrep #WeatherReady

Hurricane Preparedness: Develop An Evacuation Plan. Find out today if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone and identify trusted sources for receiving evacuation orders. Plan for multiple options on where to go and how to get there. Have a go bag for supplies and a plan for your pets. Be prepared to leave immediately if ordered to evacuate.

 

Assemble Disaster Supplies

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Just having enough supplies to make it through a hurricane isn’t enough. You need plenty to make it through what could be a LONG recovery period too. Water and electricity could be out for a week or more. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family for a MINIMUM of three days. Also make sure you have extra cash, a battery-powered radio, flashlights, and a portable crank or solar powered USB charger to charge your cell phone. ready.gov/kit

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Just having enough supplies to make it through a hurricane isn’t enough. You need plenty to make it through what could be a long recovery period too. Prepare for AT LEAST three days. ready.gov/kit #HurricanePrep #WeatherReady

Hurricane Preparedness: Assemble Disaster Supplies. Make a list of supplies and assemble them before hurricane season begins. Have enough food and water for each person for at least three days. Fill your prescriptions and have medicine on hand. Radios, batteries and phone chargers are also must-haves. Gas up your vehicle and have cash on hand.

 

Get an Insurance Checkup

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Today, call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance checkup to make sure you have enough homeowners insurance to repair or even replace your home...and remember, standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding. Whether you’re a homeowner or renter, you’ll need a separate policy for flooding. floodsmart.gov. Act now as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.

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Are you insured for a hurricane? Keep in mind that standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding, and flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period! Find coverage at floodsmart.gov #HurricanePrep #HurricaneStrong

Hurricane Preparedness: Get An Insurance Checkup. Check in with your insurance agency before hurricane season. Remember that flood insurance must be obtained separately. Prepared your home and vehicles according to your policy. Know where your insurance documents are located and take them with you if evacuation. Visit floodsmart.gov for more.

 

Strengthen Your Home

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If you plan to ride out a hurricane in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications. Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand high winds.
flash.org/protect.php

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Can your home withstand a hurricane? Make sure it is up to local hurricane building code specifications. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand high winds. flash.org/protect.php

Hurricane Preparedness: Strengthen Your Home. There's a lot you can do around your home to help protect it from hurricane winds. Before hurricane season, trim trees on your property and get approved window coverings. Ahead of storms, collect loose outdoor items, secure all doors on your property, and a find a safe location for your vehicle.

 

Help Your Neighbor

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Many Americans rely on their neighbors after a disaster, but there are also many ways you can help your neighbors before a hurricane approaches. Learn about all the different actions your community can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes: ready.gov/neighbors

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You can play a large role in how your neighbors fare before, during and after a hurricane. ready.gov/neighbors #HurricanePrep #WeatherReady

Hurricane Preparedness: Help Your Neighbor. Many people, especially senior citizens, rely on the assistance of neighbors before and after hurricanes. Help your neighbors collect the supplies they'll need before the storm. Assist them with evacuation if ordered to do so, or check on them after it's safe for you to head outside.

 

Complete a Written Plan

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The time to prepare for a hurricane is NOW, before a storm is upon you. Once you’re under pressure, having a written plan will take the guesswork out of what you need to do to protect you and your family. Know where you will ride out the storm and get your supplies now. You don’t want to be standing in long lines when a Hurricane Watch is issued. Those supplies that you need will probably be sold out by the time you reach the front of the line. Being prepared now will mean the difference between your being a hurricane victim and a hurricane survivor.
ready.gov/make-a-plan

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The time to prepare for a hurricane is NOW, before the season begins. Once you’re under pressure, having a written plan will take the guesswork out of what you need to do to protect you and your family. ready.gov/make-a-plan #HurricanePrep #WeatherReady

Hurricane Preparedness: Complete A Written Hurricane Plan. Writing down your hurricane plan will help you avoid mistakes during an emergency, and ensure everyone in your home is prepared for the storm. Have a list of essential contacts, including outside the potential impact area. Review and practice your plan with your family and friends.

 

Small Decisions: Hurricanes

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Some hurricane preparations, such as strengthening your home, can be significant efforts. But there are also small decisions that, if made, could save your life. Small decisions like keeping your gas tank full, looking up your evacuation zone, or having a long extension cord for your generator, can end up making a big impact when the storm hits. weather.gov/safety/hurricane

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Some hurricane preparations, such as strengthening your home, can be significant efforts. But there are also small decisions that, if made, could save your life. weather.gov/safety/hurricane #WeatherReady

Small Decisions can have a big impact: Hurricanes. 1) Keep your gas tank full. 2) Find out your evacuation zone. 3) Have a long extension cord to keep your generator at a safe distance. Don't let a bad decision be your last.

 

Coastal Flooding

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Coastal flooding is defined as saltwater or freshwater inundation along the coast, and can be caused by storm surge, onshore winds, high surf, or high astronomical tides. If coastal flooding is expected in your area, follow the advice of your local officials, and be prepared to evacuate. Do not drive through flooded roads and parking lots of unknown depth...what may look like a puddle could actually be a washed out road. weather.gov/safety/flood

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Coastal flooding is defined as inundation along the coast, and can be caused by storm surge, onshore winds, high surf, or high astronomical tides. If coastal flooding is expected in your area, take action. weather.gov/safety/flood #WeatherReady

Coastal Flooding.  Take Action: 1) Follow the advice of local officials, and be prepared to evacuate. 2) Do not drive through flooded roads or parking lots. 3) If you become stranded, stay indoors and move to the highest floor. Contact local law enforcement if you need assistance.

 

Hurricane Preparedness

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Are you ready for hurricane season? Find out how you can prepare and remain Weather-Ready: weather.gov/wrn/hurricane-preparedness

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Are you ready for hurricane season? Find out how you can prepare and remain Weather-Ready: weather.gov/wrn/hurricane-preparedness

Hurricane Preparedness: Determine your risk. Develop an evacuation plan. Assemble disaster supplies. Get an insurance check. Strengthen your home. Help your neighbor. Complete a written plan.

 

Storm Surge

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Storm surge can cause major damage to your home and pose a significant threat for drownings - making it one of the greatest threats to life and property from a hurricane. Listen to local officials and evacuate immediately if told to do so. If you’re not in an evacuation zone, be sure to stay away from floodwaters and never drive through water-covered roads. Remember, Turn Around Don’t Drown! weather.gov/safety/flood-turn-around-dont-drown

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Storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property from a #hurricane. weather.gov/safety/flood-turn-around-dont-drown #WeatherReady

Storm surge can be deadly.  Storm surge causes devastating flooding along the coast.  Listen to officials and follow evacuation orders.  Stay weather-ready.

 

Storm Surge Video

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Storm Surge is the abnormal rise of water generated by a storm’s winds. This hazard is historically the leading cause of deaths in the United States during storms. The destructive power of storm surge and large battering waves can result in a large loss of life and destruction along the coast. Storm surge can travel several miles inland, especially along bays, rivers, and estuaries. Watch this video to learn about storm surge and how to stay safe! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bBa9bVYKLP0 #HurricanePrep #ItOnlyTakesOne

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Learn about storm surge and how to stay safe! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bBa9bVYKLP0 #HurricanePrep #ItOnlyTakesOne

 

Secure Your Boat

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Don't wait for a Tropical Storm or Hurricane Warning to secure your boat. By then it's too late to safely work on a dock. Listen to weather forecasts and plan ahead. Haul out your boat or add additional lines as soon as a tropical storm or hurricane watch is issued. This will typically give you 48 hours before the anticipated onset of storm winds and will allow you to safely secure your boat. weather.gov/safety/safeboating-before

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Boaters: Check the forecast and secure your boat for a #hurricane BEFORE a warning is issued. weather.gov/safety/safeboating-before #HurricanePrep

Don't wait to secure your boat.  Storm surge can carry your boat onshore.  Secure your boat before the storm hits.  Add additional lines as soon as a watch is issued.

 

Plan For Your Pets

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If you have pets, do you know what you would do with them during a hurricane? Prepare for the worst by assembling an animal emergency supply kit and developing a pet care buddy system. Be aware that not all shelters accept pets. Whether you decide to stay put in an emergency or evacuate to a safer location, you will need to make plans in advance for your pets. ready.gov/animals

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What would you do with your pets during a hurricane? Visit ready.gov/animals to make a plan #HurricanePrep

Plan For Your Pets. Not all shelters accept pets. Plan in advance so your pets are taken care of. visit ready.gov/animals

 

Tropical Storms

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A tropical system does not have to be hurricane strength to be deadly. Tropical storms can produce strong winds, as well as heavy rainfall, which can lead to flooding. Don’t let your guard down when there’s a tropical storm watch. For more information about tropical storms and hurricanes, visit weather.gov/hurricanesafety

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Hurricanes can be deadly, but so can tropical storms! weather.gov/hurricanesafety #WeatherReady

Tropical Storms can be deadly. Even if it's not a hurricane, tropical storms are still dangerous. They can bring heavy rain, which can lead to deadly flooding.

 

OSHA

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Check out these resources from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and NWS to help workers & employers prepare. osha.gov/dts/weather/hurricane/index.html

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Resources from #OSHA & @NWS to help workers & employers prepare: osha.gov/dts/weather/hurricane/index.html #HurricanePrep

Prepare your workplace for hurricanes. Protect your workers. Protect your equipment. Protect your business.

 

Hurricane Preparedness - FLASH

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Are you prepared for hurricane season? Find out how you can prepare and know your evacuation zone. Visit flash.org/hurricanestrong to find out more.

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Are you prepared for hurricane season? Visit flash.org/hurricanestrong to find out #HurricaneStrong #ItOnlyTakesOne

Are your prepared for hurricane season? Know your evacuation zone. Have an insurance check-up. Build a disaster supply kit. Strengthen your home. Help your neighbor.

 

Hurricane Archive

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Remember Katrina, Iniki, and Hugo? Check out this interactive hurricane archive that shows the path and intensity of previous hurricanes and tropical storms, and get motivated to prepare for the next storm. Visit coast.noaa.gov/hurricanes/

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Remember Katrina, Iniki, and Hugo? View past storms at coast.noaa.gov/hurricanes/ #HurricanePrep #ItOnlyTakesOne

Hurricane Archive