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Social Media: Tsunami Preparedness (Fall)
#WeatherReady #TsunamiPrep #Tsunami

 

Please help the NWS spread these important safety messages and posts about historic tsunamis on social media! Everyone is welcome to use the text and images provided below to help the NWS build a Weather-Ready Nation.

Tsunami Alerts Explained

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Official tsunami warnings are broadcast through local radio and tv, marine radio, wireless emergency alerts, NOAA Weather Radio, and NOAA websites. They may also come through outdoor sirens, local officials, text message alerts, and telephone notifications. Learn about the four levels of tsunami alerts for the U.S.: weather.gov/safety/tsunami-alerts

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#Tsunami warnings come from many sources, some of which include local radio and TV, NOAA Weather Radio, and @NOAA websites. Learn about tsunami alerts to make sure you’re #WeatherReady: weather.gov/safety/tsunami-alerts

U.S. Tsunami Alerts. Warning: Dangerous coastal flooding and powerful currents possible - move to high ground or inland. Advisory: Strong currents and waves dangerous to those in/very near water possible - stay out of water, away from beaches and waterways. Watch: Distant tsunami possible - stay tuned for information, be prepared to act. Information Statement: No threat or very distant event and threat not determinded - no action needed at this time.

 

Tsunami Watch vs. Warning

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A Tsunami WATCH means Be Prepared.
A Tsunami WARNING means Take Action!
weather.gov/safety/tsunami-alerts

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A Tsunami WATCH means Be Prepared.
A Tsunami WARNING means Take Action!
weather.gov/safety/tsunami-alerts #WeatherReady

Tsunami Watch means be prepared. A Tsunami Watch is issued when a tsunami is possible. Know your evacuation route. Have a plan and be ready to act quickly if a Warning is issued. Tsunami Warning means take action! A Tsunami Warning is issued when a tsunami is happening or about to happen. Move to higher ground or further inland immediately! 

 

Your Safe Place from Tsunamis

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Tsunamis are rare but incredibly destructive, so know where to go if you’re by the coast. You are generally safer by going to official evacuation zones, higher ground, or further inland. Identify your safe places before a tsunami occurs. weather.gov/safety/tsunami

Twitter
Tsunamis are rare but incredibly destructive, so know where to go if you’re by the coast. You are generally safer by going to official evacuation zones, higher ground, or further inland. Identify your safe places before a tsunami occurs. weather.gov/safety/tsunami

Your safe place from tsunamis: tsunamis are rare but incredibly destructive, so know where to go if you're by the coast. You are generally safer by going to official evacuation zones, higher ground, or further inland. Identify your safe place and official evacuation zones before a tsunami occurs.

 

Tsunami Preparedness (Video)

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A tsunami can strike any ocean coast at any time throughout the year. While they don’t happen very often, they pose a major threat to coastal communities. Check out this video for things you can do to prepare. youtu.be/x0GX_kc7JZo

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A #tsunami can strike any ocean coast, any time. If you live, work, or play on the coast, you should prepare for a tsunami. youtu.be/x0GX_kc7JZo Be #WeatherReady!

 

Tsunami Dangers

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A tsunami can be very dangerous to life and property on the coast. It can produce strong and dangerous currents, rapidly flood the land, and cause great destruction. Even small tsunamis can be dangerous. Strong currents can injure and drown swimmers, and damage and destroy boats in harbors. weather.gov/tsunamisafety

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A #tsunami can produce unusually strong currents, rapidly flood the land and cause great destruction. Even small tsunamis can be dangerous. weather.gov/tsunamisafety Be #WeatherReady!

Tsunami are deadly. Coastal areas are at risk. Tsunamis can rapidly flood the land and cause great destruction. Strongs currents can drown swimmers and destroy boats in harbors.

 

Prepare for a Tsunami

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If tsunamis are a threat in your community, you should include tsunami-specific preparations in your emergency plan. Learn the evacuation routes, identify safe places, and practice evacuating. weather.gov/safety/tsunami-before

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At risk from #tsunamis? Plan for and practice evacuation and be #WeatherReady. weather.gov/safety/tsunami-before

Prepare for a tsunami. If you live, work, or play on the coast, you should prepare. Learn evacuation routes, identify safe places, and practice evacuation.

 

What is a Tsunami?

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What is a tsunami? A tsunami is not just one wave, but a series of extremely long waves caused by a large and sudden displacement of the ocean. Most tsunamis are caused by undersea earthquakes. There is no season for tsunamis. A tsunami can strike at any time along any coast and can be very dangerous to life and property. Learn more at weather.gov/safety/tsunami-about

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What is a #tsunami? It’s a series of extremely long waves that can strike any coast, any time, and can be very dangerous to life and property. Make sure you’re prepared and #WeatherReady weather.gov/safety/tsunami-about

How a tsunami works: Most tsunamis are caused by large earthquakes below or near the ocean floor. 1) A plate shifts abruptly, causing an earthquake, and displacing water. 2) Waves are generated and move out in all directions across the ocean, some traveling as fast as 600 mph. 3) As waves enter shallow water, they compress, their speed slows, and they build in height. 4) The wave height increases, and associated currents intensify, becoming a threat to life and property.

 

Know Your Risk

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Do you live, work, or play on the coast? Do you know your community’s tsunami risk? Your community may have identified and mapped tsunami hazard and evacuation zones. Find links to tsunami maps at nws.weather.gov/nthmp/maps.html or ask your local/state emergency management office or your local NWS forecast office for more info.

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Live, work, or play on the coast? Know your #tsunami risk and evacuation zones to make sure you’re #WeatherReady: nws.weather.gov/nthmp/maps.html #TsunamiPrep

Tsunamis: Know Your Zone!

 

U.S. Tsunami Hazard

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Did you know the tsunami hazard exists for all coastal U.S. states and territories? The hazard level varies, but given the large number of people who live, work, and play on the coast, even where the hazard level is low, the consequences are high. Learn more about the hazard for your area: nws.weather.gov/nthmp/ushazard.html. #TsunamiPrep

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Could a #tsunami strike where you live, work, or play? Find out: nws.weather.gov/nthmp/ushazard.html #TsunamiPrep

U.S. Tsunami Hazard: The tsunami hazard level varies for coastal U.S. states and territories. But, given the large number of people who live, work, and play on the coast coast, even where the hazard level islow, the consequences are high. High to Very High: Alaska, Hawaii, U.S. West Coast. High: American Samao, Guam and Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rick and U.S. Virgin Islands. Very Low to Low: U.S. Atlantic Coast. Very Low: Alaska Arctic Coast, U.S. Gulf Coast.

 

Natural Tsunami Warnings

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If a tsunami strikes, there may not be enough time for an official warning, so it is important to understand natural warnings. If you are at the coast and feel a strong or long earthquake, see a sudden rise or fall of the ocean, or hear a loud roar from the ocean, a tsunami may follow. Move quickly to high ground or inland, away from the water. weather.gov/safety/tsunami-before

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Know nature's #tsunami warnings: strong or long quake, sudden ocean rise or fall, ocean roar. weather.gov/safety/tsunami-before Make sure you’re #WeatherReady!

Natural Tsunami Warnings: 1) Feel a strong or long earthquake. 2) See a sudden rise or fall of the ocean. 3) Hear a loud roar from the ocean. Any of these could mean a tsunami is coming. Get quickly to high ground or inland.

 

How to Respond to a Tsunami Warning

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In the event of a tsunami, some tsunami warnings will be official, while others will be natural. Both are equally important. Official tsunami warnings will tell you what to do. Get updates from local radio/TV or your mobile phone. Follow instructions from local officials. weather.gov/safety/tsunami-during

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Both official and natural #tsunami warnings are important. Learn how to respond to make sure you’re #WeatherReady: weather.gov/safety/tsunami-during

Natural Tsunami Warnings: 1) Feel a strong or long earthquake. 2) See a sudden rise or fall of the ocean. 3) Hear a loud roar from the ocean.  Official Tsunami Warnings (broadcast through): radio, outdoor sirens, Wireless Emergency Alerts, TV, Telephone notifications.

 

TsunamiReady

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Communication and education are important parts of the tsunami warning system. Through NOAA’s TsunamiReady program, a voluntary community recognition program, the National Weather Service works with communities to help them minimize the risk posed by tsunamis. Areas of emphasis include risk assessment, planning, education, and warning communications. Becoming #TsunamiReady can improve public safety and reduce tsunami losses. Learn more: weather.gov/tsunamiready/

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Becoming #TsunamiReady can improve public safety and reduce #tsunami losses: weather.gov/tsunamiready/ #TsunamiPrep

TsunamiReady Community: In case of earthquake, go to high ground or inland.

 

National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program

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Led by NOAA, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) works to protect lives and reduce economic losses from tsunamis at the community level. The #NTHMP includes NOAA, FEMA, the USGS, and 28 U.S. states/territories. Through collaboration, coordination, and support to partner states/territories, the NTHMP focuses on three key functions: hazard assessment, warning guidance, and mitigation. Learn more: nws.weather.gov/nthmp/.

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The National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program aims to protect lives, reduce economic losses, and help you stay #WeatherReady nws.weather.gov/nthmp/

National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program: Hazard assessment. Warning coordination. Mitigation and education.

 

 

September 29, 2009: Samoa Earthquake and Tsunami

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Preparedness saves lives! On September 29, 2009, a magnitude 8.1 earthquake generated a tsunami that took 192 lives and caused great destruction in Samoa, American Samoa and Tonga. While these losses were significant, the disaster could have been much worse. Due to American Samoa's ongoing tsunami preparedness outreach efforts, many lives were saved in the U.S. territory. If you live, work or play on the coast, learn what you can do to prepare for a tsunami from the National Weather Service’s Tsunami Program at weather.gov/tsunamisafety. #TsunamiPrep
 
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9/29/2009: #Tsunami killed 192, brought destruction to Samoa, American Samoa & Tonga. Knowledge saved lives! weather.gov/tsunamisafety

Today in Tsunami History: September 29, 2009 Samoa Earthquake and Tsunami. Tsunami inundation and damage in Pago, Pago, American Samoa.

 

October 11, 1918: Puerto Rico Earthquake and Tsunami

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On October 11, 1918, a tsunami set in motion by an earthquake-generated submarine landslide struck the western and northern coasts of Puerto Rico. Damage from the earthquake and tsunami approximated $62 million (2017 dollars), and at least 140 lives were lost. Today, the National Weather Service works with Puerto Rico's at-risk communities to help them prepare for future tsunamis. weather.gov/tsunamiready #TsunamiPrep

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On 10/11/1918, the Puerto Rico earthquake & #tsunami caused 140+ deaths & ~$62 million in damage. @NWS is helping Puerto Rico prepare for future tsunamis: weather.gov/tsunamiready

Today in Tsunami History: October 11, 1918 - Puerto Rico Earthquake and Tsunami.

 

November 18, 1867: U.S. Virgin Islands Earthquake and Tsunami

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On November 18, 1867, less than a month after a deadly hurricane struck the region, a magnitude 7.5 earthquake generated the most destructive and deadly tsunami in U.S. Virgin Islands recorded history. The first waves reached the shore within about 15 minutes. Since warning time may be limited, like in this event, it’s important to understand natural warnings and how to respond to them: www.weather.gov/safety/tsunami-before #TsunamiPrep

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November 18, 1867, US Virgin Islands' worst #tsunami. Waves arrived within ~15 minutes. Understand natural warnings & how to respond: www.weather.gov/safety/tsunami-before

Today in Tsunami History: November 18, 1867 - U.S. Virgin Islands Earthquake and Tsunami. Pictured: The tsunami grounded the USS Monongahela on the Frederiksted, St. Croix, shoreline.