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Social Media: Winter Storms (Fall)
#WeatherReady

 

Please help the National Weather Service spread these important safety messages on social media! Everyone is welcome to use the text and images provided below to help the NWS build a Weather-Ready Nation.

Winter Storm Watch vs Warning

Facebook
A Winter Storm WATCH means Be Prepared.
A Winter Storm WARNING means Take Action!
weather.gov/safety/winter-ww

Twitter
A Winter Storm WATCH means Be Prepared.
A Winter Storm WARNING means Take Action!
weather.gov/safety/winter-ww #WeatherReady

Winter Storm Watch means be prepared. A Winter Storm Watch is issued when heavy snow, sleet, or freezing rain is possible. Be prepared to adjust travel plans in case a Warning is issued. Winter Storm Warning means take action! A Winter Storm Warning is issued when heavy snow, sleet, or freezing rain is expected. Travel will become dangerous. Delay or adjust travel plans until conditions improve. 

 

Winter Safety for Workers

Facebook
For those working outside during cold temperatures or winter weather, stay Weather-Ready and prepared. osha.gov/dts/weather/winter_weather/

Twitter
For those working outside during cold temperatures or winter weather, stay #WeatherReady and prepared. osha.gov/dts/weather/winter_weather/

Winter Safety For Workers: 1) Wear proper footwear for traction. 2) Drink a warm beverage, stay hydrated. 3) Dress in layers. 4) Take frequent short breaks. 5) Watch for signs of hypothermia. 6) Have a winter emergency supply kit in your vehicle.

 

Safety on Ice

Facebook
Ice is never completely safe. Know how thick the ice is, and stay away from any cracks or melting ice. If you don’t know, don’t go! weather.gov/safety/winter

Twitter
Ice is never completely safe. Know how thick the ice is, and stay away from any cracks or melting ice. If you don’t know, don’t go! weather.gov/safety/winter #WeatherReady

Safety On Ice: Ice is never 100% safe. If you don't know, don't go! Minimum ice thickness guidelines for new, clear ice only: Less than 2 inches: stay off! 4 inches: supports ice fishing and walking. 5 inches: supports small groups ice skating. 6 inches: supports snow mobile ATV. 9 inches: supports cars. 12 inches: supports medium size trucks. Stay away from any cracks and melting ice.

 

Dressing for the Cold - Infographic

Facebook
Bundling up and staying dry are two of the best things you can do to stay safe from cold temperatures this fall and winter. Wear layers to stay warm and continue to follow CDC guidelines on how to protect yourself and stop the spread of COVID-19, including wearing a mask. Learn to protect yourself from the cold at weather.gov/safety/cold

Twitter
Bundling up and staying dry are two of the best things you can do to stay safe from cold temps. Wear layers to stay warm and continue to follow CDC guidelines on how to protect yourself and stop the spread of COVID-19, including wearing a mask weather.gov/safety/cold

Dressing for the Cold - Infographic. Adding layers will help keep you warm as the temperature drops. Chilly: 1-2 layers; outer layer to keep out wind, rain; long layer on legs; warm shoes (water proof). Cold: 2-3 layers; warm hat; gloves; outer layer to keep out wind, wet snow; 1-2 long layers on legs; boots (water-proof). Extreme cold: 3+ layers (1 insulating); warm hat; gloves; outer layer to keep out wind; 2+ long layers on legs; boots (water proof).

 

Ice Storms

Facebook
Is your home ready for an ice storm? Ice storms can cause power outages that can last up to several days, affecting both you and the surrounding area — that’s why it’s important to have a week’s supply of food and prescriptions. What else would you need?
Ice storms can easily break tree branches, so trim weak or damaged branches around your home, and don’t park your car under trees. And after you’ve parked, don’t leave your wipers raised...contrary to popular belief, doing so increases the chance of wiper damage.
Learn more about ice storm safety: weather.gov/safety/winter-ice-frost

Twitter
Is your home ready for an ice storm? Ice storms can cause power outages of several days, and pose a threat to tree branches and anything underneath. Stay #WeatherReady and learn more about ice storm safety: weather.gov/safety/winter-ice-frost

Are you ready for ice storms? Trim weak or damaged branches around your home. Don't leave vehicle wipers raised. Have a week's worth of food and prescriptions. Don't park your car under trees. Keep devices charged.

 

Staying Warm Without Power

Facebook
When the power goes out in winter, the cold can be deadly. But even without power, there are still ways to warm things up. Closing blinds and curtains and closing room doors can help contain heat, and stuffing towels in the cracks under doors can help keep the warmth in. And don’t forget about eating and staying hydrated - food provides energy to warm the body.
Learn more about winter safety: weather.gov/safety/winter

Twitter
When the power goes out in winter, the cold can be deadly. But even without power, there are still ways to warm things up. Stay #WeatherReady and learn more about winter safety: weather.gov/safety/winter

Staying warm when the power is out. Close blinds or curtains to keep in some heat. Close off rooms to avoid wasting heat. Wear layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing. Eat and drink; food provides energy to warm the body; avoid caffeine and alcohol. Stuff towels or rags in cracks under doors.

 

Science of Frost Formation (Video)

Facebook
Frost can be annoying to scrape off your car, but did you ever think about how it got there? Watch this video for a little frost science: youtu.be/HBn1oSWu2nE

Twitter
Frost can be annoying to scrape off your car, but did you ever think about how it got there? Watch this video for a little frost science: youtu.be/HBn1oSWu2nE

 

Science of Snowflakes

Facebook
Did you know that while no two snowflakes are exactly the same, they are all six-sided? Snowflakes’ hexagonal shapes are due to the molecular structure of ice. Learn more about the science behind snowflakes: noaa.gov/stories/how-do-snowflakes-form-science-behind-snow

Twitter
Did you know that no two snowflakes are alike, but they are all 6-sided? noaa.gov/stories/how-do-snowflakes-form-science-behind-snow #SnowflakeScience

Science of Snowflakes: No two snowflakes are the same, but they are all six-sided. Their shapes are due to the molecular structure of ice.

 

Winter Driving

Facebook
Winter driving can be hazardous. One simple way to keep yourself and everyone on the road safe is to slow down. Remember, “Ice and snow, take it slow”. Learn more at weather.gov/winter

Twitter
Do your part to keep everyone safe on the roads this winter. Learn more at weather.gov/winter #WeatherReady

Ice and Snow, Take it Slow. 70% of snow and ice-related injuries occur in automobiles. Leave extra space between you and the vehicle in front of you.

 

Winter and Pets

Facebook
Don't forget about your pets this winter! Make sure they have a warm, dry place to rest with plenty of food and water. weather.gov/winter

Twitter
You love your pets, so keep them warm, dry, and well-fed this winter. weather.gov/winter #WeatherReady

Don't forget your pets - bring them indoors. Make sure they have a warm dry place with plenty of food and water.

 

Science of Wind Chill

Facebook
Extremely cold air affects millions of people across the United States every winter, and even into parts of the spring. This Arctic air, together with brisk winds, can lead to dangerously cold wind chill values, which can cause your body to lose heat quickly. weather.gov/safety/cold-wind-chill-chart

Twitter
Arctic air, together with brisk winds, can lead to dangerously cold wind chill values. weather.gov/safety/cold-wind-chill-chart

Infographic - The Science of Wind Chill. The average temperature of the human body is 98.6 degrees fahrenheit. Under calm conditions, the body radiates heat, creating a layer of warmth between or skin and the cold surroundings.  But when it's windy, the moving air breaks up this insulating layer. It speeds up heat loss by whisking away the warmth from our skin. Hypothermia begins when our body temperature drops two to four degrees.

 

Winter Injuries and Fatalities

Facebook
Slippery sidewalks and roads aren’t the only things to look out for in late winter and early spring snow storms. Shoveling snow can be a health risk as well. Remember to stay hydrated, take frequent breaks, and move only small amounts with each shovel pass. Learn more at weather.gov/winter

Twitter
Shoveling snow can be a health risk, so remember to take it easy. Learn more at weather.gov/winter #WeatherReady

Shovel smart! Shoveling heavy, wet snow can put a big strain on the heart. Stay hydrated and take frequent breaks. Only move small amounts with each shovel pass.

 

Winter Precipitation

Facebook
Will there be rain, ice or snow? This graphic explains how having different layers of warm and cold air between the clouds and the ground determines the type of precipitation that hits the ground. nssl.noaa.gov/education/svrwx101/winter/types/

Twitter
Will there be rain, ice or snow? Find out how wintry precipitation forms! nssl.noaa.gov/education/svrwx101/winter/types/

Winter Precipitation Infographic

 

Nor’easter

Facebook
Nor’easters impact millions of people in the eastern U.S. with heavy snow and strong winds. What will you do if one approaches your region? weather.gov/safety/winter-noreaster

Twitter
Nor’easters impact millions in the eastern U.S. with heavy #snow and strong winds. Are you prepared? weather.gov/safety/winter-noreaster #WeatherReady

Be ready for Nor'easters. Check your forecast from a trusted source. Purchase a shovel and snow-melting material. Fill up your car's gas tank.

 

Winter’s Fury: Nor’easters

Facebook
Not many winter storms have the potential to bury 100 million people in 1-2 feet of snow in a single day. Nor’easters are notorious for packing strong winds and copious amounts of moisture they get from the Atlantic. The heavily populated region between Washington D.C., Philadelphia, New York City, and Boston -- the “I-95 Corridor” -- is especially impacted by Nor’easters. weather.gov/safety/winter-noreaster

Twitter
Nor’easters are notorious for big wind and copious amounts of moisture they get from the Atlantic. weather.gov/safety/winter-noreaster #WeatherReady

Winter’s Fury - Nor’easters: Not many winter storms have the potential to bury 100 million people in 1-2 feet of snow in a single day. Nor'easters are notorious for packing big wind and copious amounts of moisture they get from the Atlantic. The heavily populated region between Washington D.C., Philadelphia, New York and Boston, the 'I-95 Corrdior', is epsecially impacted by Nor'easters.

 

Snow Water Cycle

Facebook
During winter months, falling snow serves as an important source of fresh water across the world. When spring arrives, melting snow helps replenish rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. The melting snow adds much-needed moisture to the soil and helps refill underground aquifers, which are vital for growing crops and for drinking water. weather.gov/jetstream/hydro

Twitter
During winter months, falling snow serves as an important source of fresh water. weather.gov/jetstream/hydro

Snow Water Cycle: The hydrologic cycle involves the continuous circulation of water in the Earth-Atmosphere system. At its core, the water cycle is the motion of the water from the ground to the atmosphere and back again. During the winter months, falling snow serves as an important source of fresh water across the world. When spring arrives, melting snow helps replenish rivers, lakes and reservoirs. The melting snow adds much needed moisture to the soil and helps refill underground aquifers, which are vital for growing crops and for drinking water.

 

Hypothermia Infographic

Facebook
If you notice someone exhibiting warning signs of hypothermia, get them to a warm place right away. Learn how to protect yourself from the cold at weather.gov/safety/cold

Twitter
Do you know the signs of hypothermia? weather.gov/safety/cold #WeatherReady

Warnings signs of hypothermia: confusion, shivering, difficulty speaking, sleepiness, stiff muscles.

 

Avalanche

Facebook
Before you hit the slopes, make sure to check out avalanche safety tips at weather.gov/safety/winter-avalanche

Twitter
Before you hit the slopes, make sure to check out avalanche safety tips at weather.gov/safety/winter-avalanche #WeatherReady

Avalanches can be deadly. 90% of all avalanche incidents are triggered by people. Check out the snowpack conditions before traveling into the backcountry.

 

Cold Weather

Facebook
Cold weather can be life-threatening. If you can’t avoid being outside, remember to follow these 3 steps and tell someone where you’re going. weather.gov/safety/cold

Twitter
Cold weather can be life-threatening, so follow these 3 steps and tell someone where you’re going. weather.gov/safety/cold #WeatherReady

Cold w3eather safety tips: 1) Dress in layers. 2) Cover exposed skin. 3) Limit time outside

 

Black Ice

Facebook:
Black ice is difficult to see and makes roads very slippery, especially on bridges and overpasses. Please drive slowly. weather.gov/winter

Twitter:
Black ice is difficult to see and makes roads very slippery, especially on bridges and overpasses. weather.gov/winter #WeatherReady

Please Drive Slowly. Black Ice is difficult to see and makes roads very slippery, especially bridges and overpasses.