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High Fire Danger In Parts Of The Southwest U.S. On Thursday

Strong winds and very low humidity will create dangerous fire weather conditions in parts of the Desert Southwest and southern High Plains on Thursday. Any fires that ignite could rapidly grow out of control in this region. Fire Weather Watches and Red Flag Warnings are in effect for these areas. Read More >

NWS Shreveport Cooperative Observer Program

"From its inception, the National Weather Service has relied heavily on cooperative weather observers for establishment and maintenance of the nation's climatic database. It follows that appointing, training, and keeping good observers is a very high priority."

 
What is the Cooperative Observer Program?

The National Weather Service (NWS) Cooperative Observer Program (Coop) is truly the Nation's weather and climate observing network of, by and for the people. More than 8,700 volunteers take observations on farms, in urban and suburban areas, National Parks, seashores, and mountaintops. The data are truly representative of where people live, work and play.

The Coop was formally created in 1890 under the Organic Act. Its mission is two-fold:

  • To provide observational meteorological data, usually consisting of daily maximum and minimum temperatures, snowfall, and 24-hour precipitation totals, required to define the climate of the United States and to help measure long-term climate changes
  • To provide observational meteorological data in near real-time to support forecast, warning and other public service programs of the NWS.

Coop observational data supports the NWS climate program and field operations. The program responsibilities include:

  • Selecting data sites
  • Recruiting, appointing and training of observers
  • Installing and maintaining equipment
  • Keeping station documentation observer payroll
  • Collecting data and its delivering it to users
  • Maintaining data quality control
  • Managing fiscal and human resources required to accomplish program objectives.

A cooperative station is a site where observations are taken or other services rendered by volunteers or contractors. Observers are not required to take any tests. Automatic observing stations are considered cooperative stations if their observed data are used for services which otherwise would be provided by cooperative observers. A cooperative station may be collocated with other types of observing stations such as standard observations stations, Flight Service Stations, etc. In these cases, that portion of the station observing program supporting the cooperative program's mission is treated and documented independently of the other observational and service programs.

Observers generally record temperature and precipitation daily and electronically send those reports daily to the NWS and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). Many cooperative observers provide additional hydrological or meteorological data, such as evaporation or soil temperatures. Data is transmitted via telephone, computer or, in special cases, by mail. Equipment used at NWS cooperative stations may be owned by the NWS, the observer, or by a company or other government agency, as long as it meets NWS equipment standards.

The first network of cooperative stations was set up as a result of an act of Congress in 1890 that established the Weather Bureau, but many Coop stations began operation long before that time. John Campanius Holm's weather records, taken without the benefit of instruments in 1644-45, were the earliest known observations in the United States. Subsequently many persons, including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Benjamin Franklin, maintained weather records. Thomas Jefferson maintained an almost unbroken record of weather observations between 1776 and 1816, and George Washington took his last observation just a few days before he died.

Two of the most prestigious awards given to Cooperative Weather Observers are named after Holm and Jefferson. Because of its many decades of relatively stable operation, high station density, and high proportion of rural locations, the Cooperative Network has been recognized as the most definitive source of information on U.S. climate trends for temperature and precipitation. Cooperative stations form the core of the U.S. Historical Network (HCN) and the U.S. Reference Climate Network.

Volunteer weather observers conscientiously contribute their time so that observations can provide the vital information needed. These data are invaluable in learning more about the floods, droughts, heat and cold waves affecting us all. The data are also used in agricultural planning and assessment, engineering, environmental-impact assessment, utilities planning, and litigation. Coop data plays a critical role in efforts to recognize and evaluate the extent of human impacts on climate from local to global scales.

Facts about the COOP Program
How to Become a Cooperative Observer

NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) staff at 121 locations nationwide recruit Cooperative Observers. Station locations are not selected by NWS Regional or National Headquarters.

The distribution of Cooperative Weather Stations is a function of need. Needs are defined by data users and considered within the context of constraints of limited federal resources.

The basic distribution of Cooperative stations in the network are governed by an 1953 Iowa State University study, which determined that a spacing of about one station every 25 miles (one per 625 square miles) was sufficient to adequately define the climate of the United States in areas of homogeneous terrain. Greater densities are allowed in areas with large differences in elevation, urban heat islands, steep land-sea-lake interfaces, etc.

Because the network is 110 years old (established in 1890), many areas already have the necessary stations operating; however, about 200 observers resign each year, about 4 per state. Additionally, changing requirements can expand the need for observers.

Becoming an NWS Cooperative observer volunteer requires the following:

  1. Dedication to public service
  2. Attention to detail
  3. Ability to learn and perform daily duties
  4. Willingness to allow NWS to place measuring instruments on your property
  5. Willingness to allow at least one visit per year from a NWS representative.

Additionally, the following capabilities are useful but are not mandatory:

  1. Ownership of a personal computer with modem and familiarity with its basic uses
  2. Established internet access.

If you are selected to become an official NWS Cooperative station, NWS will provide you with the training and supervision you will need to perform your duties. Depending on your station's instrumentation, your site will be visited once or twice every 12 months, more if unscheduled maintenance or training updates are required.

Generally, volunteer observers receive no pay. Sometimes, because of special circumstances, exceptions are made locally. Questions regarding monthly stipends can be answered by your local NWS representative.

If you are interested in becoming an NWS Cooperative observer for NWS-Shreveport, contact Observing Program Leader, Aaron Stevens

 
Latest COOP Daily Temperature and Rainfall Data
000
SHUS44 KSHV 251540
AGOSHV
Substation Temperature and Precipitation Observations
National Weather Service Shreveport LA
1100 AM CDT Thu May 25 2017

NWS Coop             24 hour     Temp at    24 hour
Substation          High  Low    Ob Time     Precip
---------------------------------------------------
North Louisiana:
Columbia Lock        72    52       52        0.00
Homer 1N             70    45       46        0.00
Mooringsport         73    54       55        0.00
Natchitoches #2      76    55       63        0.00
Red Rvr Research     74    54       59        0.00
S`port-Srn Hills     73    51       51        0.00


East Texas:
Atlanta              73    50       50        0.00
Carthage             76    54       60        0.00
Center               76    52       52        0.00
Hallsville           75    53       54        0.00
Henderson            76    55       56        0.00
Longview #2          79    55       60        0.00
Marshall             73    49       55        0.00
Sam Rayburn Dam      76    52       61        0.00
Toledo Bend Dam      75    53       54        0.00
Tyler                78    55       57        0.00
Wright Patman Dam    71    51       62        0.00


Southwest Arkansas:
Ashdown              71    51       51        0.00
Hope 3NE             70    47       50        0.00
Magnolia             70    48       49        0.00
Nashville            72    48       52        0.00


Southeast Oklahoma:
Battiest             70    44       45        0.00


Daily agricultural observations, soil temperatures, class A
pan evaporation, and totalizing anemometer wind measurements


NWS Coop         Soil Temperature   Evaporation   Total
Substation      High  Low  Current                Winds
-------------------------------------------------------
Red Rvr Rsch LA  77    74               0.30       73
Rayburn Dam TX                          0.34       33
Toledo Bend LA                          0.27
W. Patman Dam TX                        0.24       66


$$

VIII.

   
Latest COOP Rainfall Data
000
SRUS44 KSHV 251352
RRMSHV
Miscellaneous Hydrologic Data Report
National Weather Service Shreveport LA
910 AM CDT Thu May 25 2017

Rainfall reports for the 24 hour period ending at 8 AM.

No rainfall reported.
$$

 
Latest Local CoCoRaHS Reports
142
SXUS54 KSHV 251605
LCOSHV

COCORAHS PRECIPITATION SUMMARY
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SHREVEPORT LA
1100 AM CDT THU MAY 25 2017

COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS
THESE REPORTS ARE CONSIDERED SUPPLEMENTAL AND UNOFFICIAL
VALUES ARE FOR THE PREVIOUS 24 HOURS ENDING AROUND 7 AM LOCAL TIME

.B SHV 0525 C DH07/PP/SF/SD/SW
:
:COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS IN NORTHWEST LOUISIANA
:
:                                               SNOW   SNOW  WATER
:                                        PCPN   FALL  DEPTH  EQUIV
:
LANT03  : NATCHITOCHES 4.8 WNW     *   :  MM  /  MM /   MM /   MM
LANT02  : NATCHITOCHES 0.9 NE      *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /  0.0 / 0.00
LACD01  : SHREVEPORT 6.2 S         *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
LACD04  : SHREVEPORT 5.3 SSE       *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
LACD10  : KEITHVILLE 4.2 WNW       *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
LAUN02  : ROCKY BRANCH 1.3 W       *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
LALN03  : RUSTON 5.5 NNW           *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
LALN08  : RUSTON 5.4 ENE           *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
LAOC05  : MONROE 2.4 WNW           *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
LAOC16  : CALHOUN 4.3 SSE          *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
LAOC23  : MONROE 5.5 ENE           *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
LARR01  : COUSHATTA 1.4 NE         *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
LASN03  : PLEASANT HILL 10.2 SE    *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
LANT05  : GOLDONNA 1.5 N           *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
LACW03  : COLUMBIA 4.1 NNW         *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
:
:COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS IN SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS
:
:                                               SNOW   SNOW  WATER
:                                        PCPN   FALL  DEPTH  EQUIV
:
ARML03  : TEXARKANA 5.3 SSW        *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
ARML11  : FOUKE 5.3 ENE            *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
ARHM05  : HOPE 0.9 SSW             *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
ARLR01  : ASHDOWN 6.5 NNW          *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
:
:COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS IN EAST TEXAS
:
:                                               SNOW   SNOW  WATER
:                                        PCPN   FALL  DEPTH  EQUIV
:
TXMRN02 : JEFFERSON 15.4 ESE       *   :  MM  /  MM /   MM /   MM
TXHRS14 : KARNACK 2.6 N            *   :  MM  /  MM /   MM /   MM
TXHRS02 : HALLSVILLE 5.5 N         *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
TXHRS12 : MARSHALL 9.7 SE          *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TXCSS05 : ATLANTA 0.3 E            *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
TXRR01  : DETROIT 14.9 N           *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
TXTI03  : MOUNT PLEASANT 1.6 SE    *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TXWD04  : QUITMAN 6.9 N            *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TXWD05  : MINEOLA 1.6 E            *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
TXUP08  : BIG SANDY 3.9 E          *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TXGG05  : LONGVIEW 3.4 NE          *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
TXGG07  : LONGVIEW 0.9 E           *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
TXSM16  : WHITEHOUSE 1.2 SW        *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TXRS01  : HENDERSON 6.1 NW         *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
TXAG02  : ZAVALLA 2.0 ESE          *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TXAG03  : LUFKIN 3.0 SW            *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TXAG05  : LUFKIN 0.9 SSE           *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
TXAG06  : LUFKIN 5.2 WNW           *   : 0.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM
:
:COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS IN SOUTHEAST OKLAHOMA
:
:                                               SNOW   SNOW  WATER
:                                        PCPN   FALL  DEPTH  EQUIV
:
OKMN05  : IDABEL 2.3 SE            *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
:
.END

$$

VIII.


 

"Over the years, a method of selecting and rewarding observers for excellence in observing, recording and reporting weather data has evolved into the Cooperative Weather Observer Awards Program."
 
Thomas Jefferson Award

This award was named in honor of Thomas Jefferson, our third president, who kept an almost unbroken series of weather records from 1776 to 1816. The Thomas Jefferson Award is the most prestigious award for the cooperative weather observer. Only five cooperatives weather observers are honored each year with the Jefferson Award for outstanding and distinctive achievements. All candidates for the award are required to have been a recipient of the Holm Award five or more years before the data the nomination form is submitted for the Jefferson Award.

Click here to see local Thomas Jefferson Award recipients from the Shreveport National Weather Service Office.

Thomas Jefferson Award
 
John Campanius Holm Award

This award was named in honor of John Campanius Holm, a Lutheran minister who was the first person recognized to have taken systematic weather observations in the American Colonies (1644-1645). Each year, twenty-five cooperative weather observers nationwide are honored with the John Campanius Holm Award for outstanding accomplishments in the field of cooperative weather observations.

Click here to see local Holm Award recipients from the Shreveport National Weather Service Office.

John Campanius Holm Award
 
Honored Institution Awards

Honored Institution Awards are given to cooperative observation institutions such as police departments, fire stations, paper mills, and universities where observations have been taken for a minimum of 25 years. During that period, different individual observers often take the weather observations. Awards can be granted at 25, 50, 75, and even 100 years.

Click here to see local Honored Institution Award recipients from the Shreveport National Weather Service Office.

 
Length of Service Awards

As with full-time employees, the NWS presents cooperative observers with length of service emblems every five years, starting at 10 to 50 years of service.

Click here to see local Length of Service Award recipients from the Shreveport National Weather Service Office.