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Early Season Winter Storm Moves into the Northeast; Cold Front Brings Snow Across the Northern Rockies into the Upper Midwest

The early season winter storm spreads to the Northeast bringing snow, sleet, and freezing rain to the region, in addition to gusty winds and coastal flooding. A series of cold fronts dropping southward from Canada will lead to snow across the Northern/Central Rockies into the Northern Plains and Upper Midwest. Read More >

Overview

A powerful storm system brought torrential rainfall and historic flooding to the Missouri Ozarks and southeastern Kansas from Friday night, April 28 through Sunday, April 30. Storm total rainfall amounts generally ranged from 4 to 8 inches with some areas of far southern and south central Missouri receiving from 10 to around 12 inches. This incredible rainfall resulted in widespread and historic flooding. Numerous roads, bridges and buildings were destroyed. Many roads were flooded through the event including state highways and Interstate 44. Several rivers reached major and historic levels.

On Friday afternoon, April 28th, a stationary front that extended from southeast Missouri across west central Arkansas into south central Oklahoma began moving northward as a warm front. As an upper level system moved out of the southern Rockies, moisture from the Gulf of Mexico began to get pulled northward up and over the stationary front. By Saturday afternoon, the warm front had moved as far north as Interstate 44. As a series of surface lows moved northeastward along the front, it brought with it waves of showers and thunderstorms that brought continuous heavy rainfall across the same area during the day on Saturday. As the warm front continued to move northward on Sunday, the cold front swept in behind it from the west bringing an end to the rainfall.

 

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