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Social Media: Heat Safety (Summer)
#WeatherReady #KeepYourCool

 

Please help the National Weather Service spread these important safety messages on social media! Everyone is welcome to use the text and images provided below to help the NWS build a Weather-Ready Nation. 

Heat can escalate quickly

Facebook
Warm temperatures can quickly rise to dangerous levels — especially in the summer and in parked cars. Stay Weather-Ready and don’t underestimate the heat. weather.gov/safety/heat

Twitter
Warm temperatures can quickly rise to dangerous levels — especially in the summer and in parked cars. Stay #WeatherReady and don’t underestimate the heat. weather.gov/safety/heat

Heat can escalate quickly. Warm temperatures can quickly become dangerous. Heat is one of the most deadly weather hazards - don't underestimate it. Never leave people or pets alone in a car. Drink plenty of water, even if you don't feel thirsty. Wear loose-fitting, light-colored clothing. Spend time in air conditioning and in the shade.

 

Heat Watch vs Warning

Facebook
An Excessive Heat WATCH means Be Prepared.
An Excessive Heat WARNING means Take Action!
weather.gov/safety/heat-ww

Twitter
An Excessive Heat WATCH means Be Prepared.
An Excessive Heat WARNING means Take Action!
weather.gov/safety/heat-ww#WeatherReady

An Excessive Heat Watch means be prepared. An Excessive Heat Watch is issued when dangerous heat is possible. Reschedule outdoor activities in the coming days. Make sure that children, the elderly, and pets have a place to cool off during the heat. An Excessive Heat Warning means take action! An Excessive Heat Warning is issued when dangerous is happening or about to happen. Avoid heavy activity and direct sunlight. Stay hydrated, find a cool indoor place, and check on children, elderly & pets.

 

Vulnerable Populations (Descriptions)

Facebook
Everyone is at risk from the dangers of extreme heat, but these groups are more vulnerable than most. Ensure that your loved ones and neighbors are safe from the heat and remain Weather-Ready. weather.gov/safety/during

Twitter
Everyone is at risk from the dangers of extreme heat, but these groups are more vulnerable than most. Ensure that your loved ones and neighbors are safe from the heat and remain #WeatherReady. weather.gov/safety/during

Heat Impacts on Vulnerable Populations. Pregnant: Extreme heat events have been associated with adverse birth outcomes such as low birth weight, preterm birth, infant mortality, and congenital cataracts. Newborns: Newborns are extra sensitive to heat because their ability to regulate body temperature is limited. Children: Young children and infants are particularly vulnerable to heat, as their bodies are less able to adapt to heat than adults. Those under four are especially vulnerable. Elderly: Older adults, especially those who have preexisting diseases, take certain medications, live alone or have limited mobility are at higher risk for heat illness. Chronic Illness: People with chronic medical conditions are more likely to have a serious health problem during a heat wave.

 

Vulnerable Populations (Actions)

Facebook
Everyone is at risk from the dangers of extreme heat, but these groups are more vulnerable than most. Ensure that your loved ones and neighbors are safe from the heat and remain Weather-Ready. weather.gov/safety/during

Twitter
Everyone is at risk from the dangers of extreme heat, but these groups are more vulnerable than most. Ensure that your loved ones and neighbors are safe from the heat and remain #WeatherReady. weather.gov/safety/during

Heat Impacts on Vulnerable Populations. Everyone is at risk from the dangers of extreme heat, but these groups are more vulnerable than most: pregnant, newborns, children, elderly, chronic illness. Age and certain conditions make the body less able to regulate temperature. Never leave anyone alone in a closed car. Use air conditioners and stay in the shade. Drink plenty of water, even if not thirsty. Wear loose-fitting, light-colored clothing.

 

Your Safe Place from Heat

Facebook
Heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths most years. You are generally safe indoors with the AC on, while staying hydrated. If you can’t easily get indoors, stay in the shade. Stay Weather-Ready and learn more about heat safety: weather.gov/safety/heat

Twitter
Heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths most years. You are generally safe indoors with the AC on, while staying hydrated. If you can’t easily get indoors, stay in the shade. Stay #WeatherReady and learn more about heat safety: weather.gov/safety/heat

Your safe place from heat: heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths most years. You are generally safe indoors with the AC on, while staying hydrated. During extreme heat, stay inside and keep cool.

 

What Weather-Ready Looks Like: Hot Cars

Facebook
What does being Weather-Ready look like? When it comes to vehicle heat safety, it means caregivers and parents setting reminders and always looking before they lock. Learn more heat safety and preparedness tips at weather.gov/safety/heat

Twitter
What does being #WeatherReady look like? When it comes to vehicle heat safety, it means caregivers and parents setting reminders and always looking before they lock. Learn more heat safety and preparedness tips at weather.gov/safety/heat

What does Weather-Ready look like? During heat: Responsible caregivers and parents never leaving the vulnerable alone in vehicles, and always looking before they lock.

 

Look Before You Lock

Facebook
On average, 38 kids die each year by being left in a vehicle. 88% are under 3 years old. 54% were forgotten by a caregiver. weather.gov/safety/heat-children-pets

Twitter
On average, 38 kids die each year by being left in a vehicle. 88% are under 3 years old. 54% were forgotten by a caregiver. weather.gov/safety/heat-children-pets #LookBeforeYouLock #WeatherReady

Look Before You Lock! Hot Cars and Children Safety. 38 kids die each year by being left in an unattended vehicle. 88% are ages of 3 & under. 54% were forgotten by a caregiver. 100% of these deaths can be avoided! Statistics courtesy of www.noheatstroke.org

 

Pet Heat Safety

Facebook
Animals can die of heatstroke within 15 minutes, and cracking the car windows doesn’t help. NEVER leave your pets in parked vehicles. weather.gov/safety/heat-children-pets

Twitter
Animals can die of heatstroke within 15 minutes, and cracking the car windows doesn’t help. NEVER leave your pets in parked vehicles. weather.gov/safety/heat-children-pets#WeatherReady

Pet Heat Safety: Save a pet's life in a hot car. Animals can die of heatstroke within 15 minutes. Cracking the windows does not help, the inside still gets dangerously hot. During hot weather, keep your pets at home. If you see a pet in an uattended vehicle, do not leave until the problem has been resolved.

 

Survivor Story: Dehydration

Facebook
“I chose to hike alone, without water, and I did not check the weather. When I returned, I was clammy, shaking, ash gray, had a splitting headache and felt nauseous. It took over a day to recover. Always have plenty of water.” Check the weather before you go! weather.gov/heat

Twitter
“I chose to hike alone, without water, and I did not check the weather. When I returned, I was clammy, shaking, ash gray, had a splitting headache and felt nauseous. It took over a day to recover. Always have plenty of water.” weather.gov/heat #WeatherReady

I decided to hike Mt. Talac, 10 miles, often running. I chose to hike alone, without water, and I did not check the weather. When I returned, I was clammy, shaking, ash gray, had a splitting headache and felt nauseous. It took over a day to recover. Don't be lazy. Always have plenty of water. Quote from Sabrina, Lake Tahoe, California, 1991

 

During Excessive Heat

Facebook
Heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths in most years. Protect yourself during excessive heat and stay Weather-Ready. weather.gov/heat

Twitter
Heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths in most years. Protect yourself during excessive heat and stay #WeatherReady. weather.gov/heat

During Excessive Heat: Find air conditioning. Avoid strenuous activities. Wear light clothing. Check on family members and neighbors. Drink plenty of water. Watch for heat cramps, exhaustion, and stroke. Never leave people or pets in a closed car.

 

After the Sun Goes Down

Facebook
Even after the sun goes down, heat can be a real danger - especially in large cities. Dark pavement and buildings are very effective at absorbing heat. Stay Weather-Ready by always practicing heat safety, no matter the time of day. weather.gov/heat

Twitter
Even after the sun goes down, heat can be a real danger - especially in large cities. Dark pavement and buildings are very effective at absorbing heat. Stay #WeatherReady by always practicing heat safety, no matter the time of day. weather.gov/heat

Excessive Heat: dangerous even after the sun goes down. Large cities often experience higher temperatures than surrounding areas because of all the heat-absorptive surfaces, such as dark pavement and buildings. This is known as an urban heat island. The upper floors of brick buildings are particularly susceptible to the dangers of excessive heat without air conditioning, because they retain heat after the sun goes down. The strong influence of the urban heat island on nighttime temperatures limits the ability of people to cool down and recover the heat of the next day.

 

Excessive Heat

Facebook
Stay Weather-Ready from the dangers of excessive heat. Learn how to protect yourself and your loved ones at weather.gov/heat #HeatSafety

Twitter
Stay #WeatherReady from the dangers of excessive heat. Learn how to protect yourself and your loved ones at weather.gov/heat #HeatSafety

Excessive Heat:
Why is excessive heat so dangerous?
Heat becomes especially dangerous if it lingers for more than one day.
Hot days and warm nights don’t give our bodies time to cool down.
Heat islands can intensify extreme hot weather, which can cause breathing problems, heat cramps, heat stroke, and may lead to illness or even death.

What can you do?
Check on your friends, family and neighbors during heat waves.
Wear light, loose-fitting clothing and drink water often. Don't wait until you are thirsty.
Avoid unnecessary hard work or activities if you are outside or in a building without air-conditioning.
Stay in an air-conditioned area. Air conditioning is the strongest protective factor against heat-related illness.

 

Heat Symptoms

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During hot and humid weather, your body's ability to cool itself is challenged. When your body heats too rapidly to cool itself properly, or when too much fluid or salt is lost through dehydration or sweating, you may experience a heat-related illness. Learn the symptoms of excessive heat exposure and the appropriate responses. weather.gov/safety/heat-illness

Twitter
Learn the symptoms of excessive heat exposure and the appropriate responses.
weather.gov/safety/heat-illness #WeatherReady

Heat Symptoms:
Heat Exhaustion: faint or dizzy; excessive sweating; cool, pale, clammy skin; nausea or vomiting; rapid, weak pulse; muscle cramps. Get to a cooler, air conditioned place. Drink water if fully conscious. Take a cool shower or use cold compress.
Heat Stroke: throbbing headache; no sweating; body temperature above 103 degrees; red, hot, dry skin; nausea or vomiting; rapid, strong pulse; you may lose consciousness.  Call 911 - take immediate action to cool the person until help arrives.

 

Heat Wave

Facebook
Heat is the leading cause of weather-related fatalities each year. A heat wave is a period of abnormally hot and sometimes humid weather, generally lasting more than a couple of days. Heat waves have the potential to cover a large area, exposing a high number of people to a hazardous combination of heat and humidity, which can be very taxing on the body. Learn how to stay safe during a heat wave at www.weather.gov/heatsafety

Twitter
Heat wave: a period of abnormally hot & humid weather, lasting 2+ days. www.weather.gov/heat #WeatherReady

What is a heat wave?  Abnormally hot and humid weather lasting at least 2 days.  Heat waves can occur anywhere in the country and cause heat illness or even death.

 

Working Outside

Facebook
Outdoor workers can be at a higher risk from the effects of excessive heat. When working under hot conditions, OSHA recommends #WaterRestShade as well as allowing more frequent breaks for new workers or workers who have been away from the job for a week or more (acclimatization). Knowing symptoms, prevention and emergency response methods can help prevent heat-related illnesses and death. Check weather forecasts ahead of time to be better prepared. www.osha.gov/heat

Twitter
Working outside in the heat today? Make sure you get #WaterRestShade! Learn more at www.osha.gov/heat #OSHA #WeatherReady

Heat Safety when outside: heat and humidity pose a threat to workers.  Remember to drink water and take breaks in the shade.

 

Heat Safety Infographic

Facebook
Heat is typically the leading cause of weather-related fatalities each year. Heat waves have the potential to cover a large area, exposing a high number of people to a hazardous combination of heat and humidity, which can be very taxing on the body. Learn how to stay safe during a heat wave at weather.gov/heat

Twitter
During a heat wave, practice heat safety wherever you are. Heat related deaths and illnesses are preventable! #WeatherReady www.weather.gov/heat

Practice Heat Safety wherever you are.  Job Sites: stay hydrated and take breaks in the shade as often as possible.  Indoors: Check up on the elderly, sick and those without AC.  Vehicles: Never leave kids or pets unattended - LOOK before you LOCK.  Outdoors: Limit strenuous outdoor activities, find shade, and stay hydrated.  Heat-related deaths are preventable.  Protect yourself and others from the impacts of heat waves.

 

Auto Safety Infographic

Facebook
Never, never, never leave children, disabled or elderly adults, or pets in parked, unattended vehicles! Studies have shown that the temperature inside a parked vehicle can rapidly rise to dangerous levels for people and pets. Leaving the windows slightly open does not significantly decrease the heating rate. The effects can be more severe on children because their bodies have not developed the ability to efficiently regulate internal temperature. weather.gov/safety/heat-children-pets

Twitter
Never, Never, NEVER leave children, disabled adults, or pets in parked, unattended vehicles! weather.gov/safety/heat-children-pets #WeatherReady

Heat-Related Deaths ARE Preventable.  LOOK BEFORE YOU LOCK.  The temperature in your car can quickly become deadly!

 

Sunburn Safety

Facebook
Spending time in the sun on vacation this spring? Apply plenty of sunscreen! Also keep in mind that heat-related illness is a possibility if you don’t take certain precautions. Find out more about heat-related illnesses and how to prevent them at weather.gov/heat

Twitter
Spending time in the sun? Apply sunscreen and avoid heat-related illness: weather.gov/heat #WeatherReady

Don't Forget the Sunscreen

 

4 Questions before working outdoors

Facebook
Four questions you need to ask yourself before working or playing outdoors: Do you have enough water? Do you have temporary shade available? Do you know the symptoms of heat illness? Do you know who to call in an emergency? www.osha.gov/heat

Twitter
Four questions you need to ask yourself prior to working or playing outdoors. www.osha.gov/heat #WeatherReady

4 Questions before working outdoors: 1. Do you have enough water? 2. Do you have temporary shade available? 3. Do you know the symptoms of heat illness? 3. Do you know who to call in an emergency?

 

Protect Yourself

Facebook
When it is hot, wear lightweight, loose-fitting and light-colored clothing to reflect heat and sunlight. Hats are also a good idea to protect your face and scalp from harmful UV rays if you will be spending time directly in the sunshine. Also, don’t forget to apply sunscreen liberally. www.weather.gov/heatsafety

Twitter
Find out how to dress for the weather www.weather.gov/heatsafety #WeatherReady

Protect yourself from the heat when outside: Drink plenty of water. Apply sunscreen regularly. Dress in lightweight and light-colored clothing. Take breaks in the shade.

 

Heat Index

Facebook
Did you know the air temperature can actually feel hotter than what the thermometer reads? The Heat Index is a measure of how hot it really feels when relative humidity is factored in. To find out how hot it feels, you can use the pictured chart or the Heat Index calculator found at: weather.gov/safety/heat-index

Twitter
The Heat Index tells you how hot it feels with humidity. weather.gov/safety/heat-index #WeatherReady

Pictured: Heat Index