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Social Media: Wildfire (Summer)
#WeatherReady

 

Please help the National Weather Service spread these important safety messages on social media! Everyone is welcome to use the text and images provided below to help the NWS build a Weather-Ready Nation.

Fire Weather Watch vs. Red Flag Warning

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A Fire Weather Watch means BE PREPARED, critical fire weather conditions are expected or possible, but not imminent or occurring. A Red Flag Warning means TAKE ACTION, critical fire weather conditions are either occurring now or will shortly. Learn more at weather.gov/safety/wildfire-ww

Twitter
Know the difference between a Red Flag Warning and Fire Weather Watch. weather.gov/safety/wildfire-ww #WeatherReady

Fire Weather Watch means be prepared. A Fire Weather Watch is issued when critical fire weather conditions are possible. 'Critical fire conditions' means warm temperatures, low humidity, and strong, gusty winds. Red Flag Warning means take action! A Red Flag Warning is issued when critical fire conditions are happening or are about to happen. Avoid burning, be careful around open flames, safely dispose of cigarettes. Fires can spark and grow very quickly.

 

Wildfires escalate quickly

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Wildfires can spread quickly — by the time one is nearby, you may not have much time. Stay Weather-Ready by preparing ahead of time. Ready your home, have an evacuation plan, and prepare an emergency supply kit. weather.gov/safety/wildfire

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Wildfires can spread quickly — by the time one is nearby, you may not have much time. Stay #WeatherReady by preparing ahead of time. Ready your home, have an evacuation plan, and prepare an emergency supply kit. weather.gov/safety/wildfire

Wildfires can escalate quickly. Wildfire growth can be terrifyingly sudden and deadly. Prepare ahead of time so you'll be ready. Clear brush away from your home to create defensible space. Use fire-resistant landscaping. Know your potential evacuation routes. Have an emergency supply kit ready to go.

 

Evacuation During Wildfires

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If wildfires are threatening your area, stay informed of evacuation orders. Leave immediately when asked to avoid being caught in fire, smoke, or road congestion. Have an emergency supply kit in your vehicle and know your evacuation route.
weather.gov/safety/wildfire

Twitter
If wildfires are threatening your area, stay informed of evacuation orders. Leave immediately when asked to avoid being caught in fire, smoke, or road congestion. Have an emergency supply kit in your vehicle and know your evacuation route.
weather.gov/safety/wildfire

Evacuating From Wildfires: Always stay aware of your enviornment. Leave when asked by your local officials. Take Action Immediately: Leave as soon as evacuation is recommended by fire officials to avoid being caught in fire, smoke or road congestion. A delay could cost your life! Take the initiative to stay informed and aware. Listen to your radio, TV, or alerts on your phone for announcements from law enforcements and emergency personnel. Cover up to proctect against heat and flying embers. Wear long pants, a long sleeve shirt, heavy shoes/boots, cap, a face mask, goggles or glasses. Ensure your emergency supply kit is in your vehicle. Enact your evacuation plan that includes the route you'll take and designated emergency meeting location outside the fire or hazard area.

 

Small Decisions: Wildfire

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There are aspects of wildfire preparation, like using fire-resistant landscaping around your home, that aren’t possible for everyone. But there are also small, potentially life-saving decisions that anyone can make. Small decisions like not burning brush during dry conditions, and clearing brush away from your home can make a big impact in not only your life...but in the lives of those around you. weather.gov/safety/wildfire

Twitter
There are aspects of wildfire preparation, like using fire-resistant landscaping around your home, that aren’t possible for everyone. But there are also small, potentially life-saving decisions that anyone can make. weather.gov/safety/wildfire #WeatherReady

Small Decisions can have a big impact: Wildfires. 1) Don't burn brush during dry conditions. 2) Clear brush away from your home. Don't let a bad decision be your last.

 

Know Your Limits

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Planning on burning brush? Know your limits. Even if there’s no Red Flag Warning, burning when windy or during low humidity can still be dangerous! weather.gov/safety/wildfire

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Planning on burning brush? Know your limits. Even if there’s no Red Flag Warning, burning when windy or during low humidity can still be dangerous! weather.gov/safety/wildfire #WeatherReady

Planning on burning?  Know your limits. Don't burn when windy or during low humidity. Know local burn bans and regulations.

 

What Weather-Ready Looks Like (Wildfire)

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What does being Weather-Ready look like? When it comes to wildfires, it means working to create defensible space by clearing brush around your property. Learn more about defensible space and other wildfire preparedness tips at weather.gov/safety/wildfire

Twitter
What does being #WeatherReady look like? When it comes to wildfires, it means working to create defensible space by clearing brush around your property. Learn more about defensible space and other wildfire preparedness tips at weather.gov/safety/wildfire

What does Weather-Ready look like? Before wildfires: Community members and property owners create a defensible space by clearing brush away from homes and buildings.

 

What Causes Wildfires to Spread?

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What causes wildfires to spread? The main culprits are dry vegetation, strong winds, high temperatures, and drought conditions.To stay Weather-Ready and protect yourself from wildfires, visit weather.gov/wildfire

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What causes wildfires to spread? The main culprits are dry vegetation, strong winds, high temperatures, and drought conditions. To stay #WeatherReady and protect yourself from wildfires, visit weather.gov/wildfire #WildfireScience

What Causes Wildfires to Spread? Dry vegetation. Strong winds. High temperatures.

 

Wildfire Safety Tips (Video)

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Wildfires killed an estimated 90+ people in the U.S. in 2018. Do you know the basics of Wildfire Safety? Stay Weather Ready by watching this short video: https://youtu.be/OGiRja2EZJ8

Twitter
Wildfires killed an estimated 90+ people in the U.S. in 2018. Do you know the basics of #WildfireSafety? Stay #WeatherReady by watching this short video: https://youtu.be/OGiRja2EZJ8

 

Wildfire Statistics

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In 2018, wildfires burned over 8 million acres, destroyed over 25,000 structures, and were responsible for over 90 deaths (estimated). Let’s do our part to keep this year’s totals well below those numbers. weather.gov/safety/wildfire-ready

Twitter
In 2018, wildfires burned over 8 million acres, destroyed over 25,000 structures, and were responsible for over 90 deaths (estimated). weather.gov/safety/wildfire-ready #WeatherReady

Wildfire Statistics

 

Speed of Wildfires

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There are a lot of factors that determine the speed of wildfires. Check out the infographic below to learn a little wildfire science, and visit weather.gov/safety/wildfire for the latest safety tips.

Twitter
There are a lot of factors that determine the speed of wildfires. Check out the infographic below to learn a little #WildfireScience, and visit weather.gov/safety/wildfire for the latest safety tips. #WeatherReady

The Speed of Wildfires:
Weather Conditions
Wind speed has a huge effect on fire intensity and how fast fires travel. Wind pushes the flame forward and closer to the unburned fuel in front of the fire. Temperature, humidity, and precipitation are also important due to their strong influence on fuel moisture content.

Spotting
Wind and thermals can carry sparks and firebrands downwind of fires, greatly increasing spread rates.

Fuel Type
The type of vegetation along with the fuel moisture content, physical properties, and chemical properties play a role in fire behavior and how fast fires spread.

Topography
Slope steepness affects fire behavior in a similar way as wind by changing the flame angle. Elevation and aspect are also important in determining how fires spread.

 

Smoke Safety - Health

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Wildfire smoke can be harmful in multiple ways. Smoke can hurt your eyes, irritate your lungs, and worsen respiratory illness. Learn how you can protect your health and be safe if you are exposed to wildfire smoke. cdc.gov/air/wildfire-smoke/default.htm

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Wildfire smoke can hurt your eyes, irritate your lungs, and worsen respiratory illness. Learn how you can protect your health and be safe. cdc.gov/air/wildfire-smoke/default.htm #WildfireSafety

Wildfires are a health risk. Smoke from wildfires can: ...sting your eyes ...irritate your lungs ...and worsen respiratory illness

 

Smoke Safety - Protective Actions

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During a wildfire, protect yourself from smoke. Stay inside and close windows and doors. If you're running an air conditioner, keep the fresh air intake closed and clean the filter to prevent outdoor smoke from getting inside. Note that cloth face coverings worn to help protect against the spread of COVID-19 do not protect against breathing in wildfire smoke. cdc.gov/air/wildfire-smoke/default.htm

Twitter
Take steps to minimize the health impacts from wildfire smoke. Stay inside and close windows and doors. Don't rely on cloth face coverings or surgical masks to prevent breathing in wildfire smoke. cdc.gov/air/wildfire-smoke/default.htm #WildfireSafety

During a wildfire, protect yourself and your loved ones from breathing in smoke.

 

Smoke Safety - Cities

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Wildfire smoke is a mix of gases and fine particles from burning vegetation and other materials. It can travel hundreds of miles and cause health concerns. Learn how to drive safely if smoke is affecting visibility in your area: cdc.gov/disasters/wildfires/index.html

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Wildfire smoke can travel hundreds of miles and affect cities. Learn how to drive safely if smoke is affecting visibility in your area: cdc.gov/disasters/wildfires/index.html #WeatherReady

Smoke from wildfires can impact cities

 

Wildfire Partners

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NOAA's National Weather Service works with federal and state wildland managers to protect lives and property in and around America's wildlands. A visit to our Wildfire Safety site will help you prepare, be aware, and act early if a wildfire comes your way. weather.gov/wildfire

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Prepare, be aware and act early if a wildfire comes your way. weather.gov/wildfire #WeatherReady

Wildfire Safety: It's a team effort.

 

Drones Near Wildfires

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If you fly, we can’t! Drones near wildfires are not safe. Only authorized aircraft are permitted near wildfires. Let wildland firefighters do their jobs to keep the public safe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06pz4GW7mY0

Twitter
If you fly, we can’t! Drones near wildfires are not safe. Only authorized aircraft are permitted near wildfires. Let wildland firefighters do their jobs to keep the public safe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06pz4GW7mY0 #WeatherReady

If you fly, we can't. Drones near wildfires are not safe!

 

IMET Article

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Did you know that National Weather Service meteorologists work on-scene at large wildfires? These Incident Meteorologists (IMETs) go through extensive training and work in challenging conditions to support wildland firefighting and containment operations. Learn what it’s like for an IMET working a wildfire: weather.gov/news/imet-article

Twitter
Did you know that @NWS Meteorologists work on-scene at large wildfires? weather.gov/news/imet-article #WeatherReady

Pictured: IMETs at work inside at their desks, and outside near dangerous wildfire situations.

 

Create a Communications Plan

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Your family may not be together when a disaster strikes, so it is important to plan in advance: how will you get to a safe place; how you will contact one another; how and where you will meet; and what will you do in different situations. Create a Family Communications Plan. ready.gov/make-a-plan

Twitter
Your family may not be together when a disaster strikes. Make a plan ready.gov/make-a-plan #WeatherReady

Pictured: A family making a communications plan.

 

Air Quality Index

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During wildfire season, visit AirNow to get the Air Quality Index in your area. Wildfire smoke can cause health problems during prolonged exposure, so it is best to know the air quality in your area in case you are planning an outdoor activity, such as camping. airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=airnow.main

Twitter
During wildfire season, stay healthy. Get the Air Quality Index in your area. airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=airnow.main #WeatherReady

Pictured: AQI (Air Quality Index logo)

 

Wildfire Air Quality Predictions

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During wildfire season, visit airquality.weather.gov to get hour by hour predictions of wildfire smoke and other pollutants for your area.

Twitter
During wildfire season, visit airquality.weather.gov to get hour by hour predictions of wildfire smoke and other pollutants for your area. #WeatherReady

Pictured: Screenshot of the airquality.weather.gov website, showing a map of the United States and air quality activity