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Social Media: Winter Driving
#WeatherReady

 

Please help the NWS spread these messages on social media! Everyone is welcome to use the text and images provided below to help the NWS build a Weather-Ready Nation.

Bridges Freeze First

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You’ve probably seen road signs advising that bridges freeze before roads, but do you know why? Having open air underneath the bridge means the cold air surrounds the bridge both above and below.
If there’s even the chance that a bridge might be frozen, SLOW DOWN! And do it before you cross the bridge — changing speed on ice is dangerous.
weather.gov/safety/winter

Twitter
You’ve probably seen road signs advising that bridges freeze before roads, but do you know why? Having open air underneath the bridge means the cold air surrounds the bridge both above and below. weather.gov/safety/winter #WeatherReady

Why Do Bridges Freeze First? No ground underneath means the entire structure can be surrounded by cold air. Freezing isn't uniform, shaded parts can be icy while sunny parts aren't. Slow down before the bridge, as changing speed on ice is dangerous.

 

Freezing Rain

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Compared to a typical snowstorm, freezing rain is much more hazardous — especially on the road. While both are dangerous, it’s far easier to lose control of your vehicle on icy pavement, not to mention the increased risk of falling branches and powerlines.
Bottom line: do not drive if there is, or recently was, freezing rain.
weather.gov/safety/winter

Twitter
Compared to a typical snowstorm, freezing rain is much more hazardous — especially on the road.
Bottom line: be #WeatherReady and do not drive if there is, or recently was, freezing rain.
weather.gov/safety/winter

Freezing Rain is the Worst. Freezing rain is more dangerous than snow, as ice can form on pavement. Watch out for falling branches and powerlines. Don't drive if there is, or recently was, freezing rain.

 

Black Ice

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When recent rain or snowmelt comes into contact with freezing temperatures, black ice can form — and you might not even see it. And while black ice is more prevalent at night, it can often stick around for the morning commute. Avoid driving if you can...don’t let black ice sneak up on you.
weather.gov/safety/winter

Twitter
Don’t let black ice sneak up on you! When recent rain or snowmelt comes into contact with freezing temperatures, black ice can form — and you might not even see it.
weather.gov/safety/winter #WeatherReady

Don't Let Black Ice Sneak up On You. It can form on any road, but also along curbs and drainage areas due to melting snow. More prevalent at night, but can still be around in the morning. Don't drive during freezing temperatures after rain or snowmelt.

 

Avalanches While Driving

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Avalanches can pose a very real danger to drivers on mountain roads. If you are caught in an avalanche, stay in your vehicle and turn off the engine to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning from a clogged tailpipe.
Avoid danger in the first place by heeding warning signs and not driving around barriers - and be Weather-Ready by equipping your car with an emergency kit.
weather.gov/safety/winter-avalanche

Twitter
Avalanches can pose a very real danger to drivers on mountain roads. If you are caught in an avalanche, stay in your vehicle and turn off the engine to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning from a clogged tailpipe. weather.gov/safety/winter-avalanche

Beware Avalanche Danger!  Heed warning signs and do not drive around barriers. If caught in an avalanche, stay in your vehicle and turn off the engine. Have an emergency kit for your vehicle.

 

Winter Travel Timeline (Video)

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Are you planning a lengthy trip by car this winter? Know how to prepare, and know that the decisions that need to be made will differ depending on where you are on the Winter Travel Timeline: youtu.be/ZzjarXUsDtA

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Are you planning a lengthy trip by car this winter? Know how to prepare, and know that the decisions that need to be made will differ depending on where you are on the Winter Travel Timeline: youtu.be/ZzjarXUsDtA #WeatherReady

Winter Road Trip Safety

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If you’re going to be driving this winter, know how to stay safe. Winterize your vehicle and pack an emergency supply kit. Share your travel plans with friends and family. Before leaving, check road conditions and the weather forecast so you know what to expect. weather.gov/safety/winter

Twitter
If you’re going to be driving this winter, know how to stay #WeatherReady. Winterize your vehicle and pack a supply kit. Share your travel plans, and before leaving, check road conditions and the weather forecast. weather.gov/safety/winter

Winter Travel - Road Trip Safety Tips: 1) Share your travel plans with friends or family. 2) Winterize your vehicle. 3) Pack an emergency supply kit. 4) Check road conditions. 5) Get the weather forecast.

 

Winter Vehicle Prep (Video)

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Is your vehicle ready for the winter? Watch this brief video to know what needs to be in your emergency kit and how to winterize your vehicle: youtu.be/hcwl_bnID50

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Is your vehicle ready for the winter? Watch this brief video to know what needs to be in your emergency kit and how to winterize your vehicle: youtu.be/hcwl_bnID50
#WeatherReady

Snow Squalls & WEAs

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Snow squalls are intense bursts of snow and wind with whiteout visibility that are extremely dangerous, especially while on the road. The National Weather Service helps you be ready by issuing Snow Squall Warnings that can trigger a Wireless Emergency Alert on your phone. If you receive one, know that a snow squall is occurring or imminent, and slow down or delay travel. weather.gov/safety/winter-snow-squall

Twitter
Snow squalls are extremely dangerous while on the road. NWS helps you be #WeatherReady by issuing Snow Squall Warnings that can trigger a Wireless Emergency Alert on your phone. When issued, slow down or delay travel. weather.gov/safety/winter-snow-squall

Snow squalls: intense bursts of snow and wind; short duration; whiteout visibility; rapidly deteriorating road conditions. National Weather Service Snow Squall Warnings: issued when a snow squall is occurring or imminent; typically in effect for 30-60 minutes in a small, targeted area; can trigger a Wireless Emergency Alert to your phone; when issued, slow down or delay travel.

 

First Snow

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While lots of snow in the middle of winter can certainly cause dangerous travel conditions, many times it’s the first little bit of snow of the season that can cause accidents. Be extra careful as you and other drivers adjust to driving in poor conditions. Slow down, don’t use cruise control, and keep your distance from other vehicles. Don’t let the first snow sneak up on you!

Twitter
While lots of snow in the middle of winter can cause dangerous travel conditions, the first little bit of snow of the season can also cause accidents. Be careful as you and other drivers adjust to driving in poor conditions. Don’t let the first snow sneak up on you! #WeatherReady

Sneaky Winter Hazards: First snow. The first snow of the year can often cause major problems on the road as people adjust to the poor driving conditions. Safety tips: slow down; don't use cruise control; leave plenty of distance between you and other vehicles.

 

Sun Glare

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Even on a nice winter day, the low sun angle can make driving hazardous. Freshly fallen snow can add more glare to your drive. Have a pair of sunglasses on hand, slow down, and leave plenty of distance between you and other vehicles. Don’t let sun glare sneak up on you!

Twitter
The low sun angle, especially combined with freshly fallen snow, can cause a glare that makes driving difficult. Keep a pair of sunglasses handy and slow down. Don’t let sun glare sneak up on you! #WeatherReady

Sneaky Winter Hazards: Sun glare. The low sun angle and possibility of fresh fallen snow means that even when the forecast is bright and sunny, your drive may be hazardous. Safety tips: Slow down; use sunglasses and your car's visor; leave plenty of distance between you and other vehicles.

 

Rain with a Temperature Near Freezing

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Rain may seem like less of a winter driving hazard than snow, but when temperatures are near freezing, that’s not the case. Ice can form quickly and make roads slick. In these conditions, slow down, don’t use cruise control, and keep plenty of distance between you and other vehicles. Don’t let this winter hazard sneak up on you!

Twitter
Rain may seem like less of a winter driving hazard than snow, but when temperatures are near freezing, that’s not the case. Ice can form quickly and make roads slick. Be extra careful in these conditions, and don’t let this winter hazard sneak up on you! #WeatherReady

Sneaky Winter Hazards: Rain with a temperature near freezing. Ice can form on roads and lead to dangerous travel when the air temperature or road temperature drops below freezing. Safety tips: slow down; don't use cruise control; leave plenty of distance between you and other vehicles.

 

Freezing Drizzle

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When surface temperatures are below freezing, drizzle will form a thin layer of ice on the roads. This difficult-to-see ice can cause very dangerous travel conditions. When it’s drizzling in the winter, slow down, don’t use cruise control, and keep your distance from other vehicles. Don’t let freezing drizzle sneak up on you!

Twitter
Freezing drizzle can cause difficult-to-see ice to form on roads, creating very dangerous travel conditions. When it’s drizzling in the winter, slow down! Don’t let freezing drizzle sneak up on you. #WeatherReady

Sneaky Winter Hazards: Freezing drizzle. The fine layer of ice that forms during freezing drizzle may be hard to notice on the road, but it is one of winter's most dangerous types of weather. Safety tips: slow down; don't use cruise control; leave plenty of distance between you and other vehicles.

 

Flash Freeze

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Even when it’s not precipitating, wet roads can quickly turn icy as temperatures dip below freezing. These unexpected slippery conditions can make driving hazardous. When roads look wet in the winter, stay cautious, slow down, and don’t use cruise control. Don’t let flash freezes sneak up on you!

Twitter
Wet roads can quickly turn to ice as temperatures fall below freezing. Slow down and don’t use cruise control. Don’t let flash freezes sneak up on you! #WeatherReady

Sneaky Winter Hazards: Flash freeze. Wet roads can freeze quickly at night or when there is a rapid drop in temperature behind a cold front. Safety tips: slow down; don't use cruise control; leave plenty of distance between you and other vehicles.

 

Rain After a Long Dry Stretch

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You wouldn’t think a little bit of rain could make the roads slippery, but after a long dry stretch, it can happen. This is because oil and debris accumulate on the road during the dry period. Once the rain starts falling, roads become slick. Slow down in these situations. This is one of those hazards that can sneak up on you!

Twitter
When it rains after a long dry stretch, roads can become surprisingly slippery. Don’t let this hazard sneak up on you! Slow down and don’t use cruise control. #WeatherReady

Sneaky Winter Hazards: Rain after a long dry stretch. Oil and debris accumulate on the road when it hasn't rained for a while, so when it first starts to rain, the road becomes slick and people are also not used to driving in it. Safety tips: slow down; don't use cruise control; leave plenty of distance between you and other vehicles.

 

Dense Fog

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Visibility can change quickly in fog, creating hazardous driving conditions. Slow down, use your low-beam headlights, and leave plenty of distance between you and other vehicles. Don’t let fog sneak up on you!

Twitter
Watch out for quickly changing visibility in fog. Use your low-beam headlights, slow down, and keep your distance from other vehicles. Don’t let fog sneak up on you! #WeatherReady

Sneaky Winter Hazards: Dense fog. Fog can be hazardous to driver, mariners, and aviators, and contributes to thousands of travel accidents every year. Visibility often changes quickly in fog. Safety tips: slow down; use your low-beam headlights; leave plenty of distance between you and other vehicles.

 

Snow Squalls

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Snow squalls are short, intense bursts of snow and wind that can catch people off-guard. They can reduce visibility and cause dangerous travel conditions. If possible, avoid or delay travel until the squall passes. If you’re caught in one, slow down, turn on your headlights and hazard lights, and try to exit the road. Don’t let snow squalls sneak up on you!

Twitter
Snow squalls are short, intense bursts of snow and wind that can reduce visibility and cause dangerous travel conditions. Try not to travel during one. Don’t let snow squalls sneak up on you! #WeatherReady

Sneaky Winter Hazards: Snow squalls. There is a long history of deadly traffic accidents associated with these intense snow events that are accompanied by strong winds and a quick reduction in visibility. Safety tips: avoid or delay motor travel until the squall passes; reduce your speed, turn on your headlights and hazard lights, and try to exit the road.

 

Ice and Snow, Take it Slow

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Winter driving can be hazardous. One simple way to keep yourself and everyone on the road safe is to slow down. Remember, “Ice and snow, take it slow”. Learn more at weather.gov/winter

Twitter
Do your part to keep everyone safe on the roads this winter. Learn more at weather.gov/winter #WeatherReady

Ice and Snow, Take it Slow. 70% of snow and ice-related injuries occur in automobiles. Leave extra space between you and the vehicle in front of you.