National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Thunderstorms, Heavy Rain and Heat in the Memorial Day Forecast

Strong to severe thunderstorms and heavy rain with possible flash flooding are expected from Texas to the Upper Mississippi Valley on Memorial Day. Also, a soaking rain with flooding is expected across south-central Florida. Meanwhile, a week of record breaking heat is going to get started across California into the Southwest and Great Basin, as excessive heat warnings stretch across the region. Read More >

High temperatures Monday afternoon throughout Central California will be eleven to thirteen degrees above normal for this time of year.
An Excessive Heat Warning is now in effect for the San Joaquin Valley, West Side Hills, and Sierra Nevada foothills from 12 PM PDT Tuesday afternoon until 7 PM PDT Thursday evening. An Excessive Heat Warning means that a prolonged period of dangerously hot temperatures is expected. Heat related illnesses, such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke are possible. Drink plenty of fluids, stay out of the sun, and remain in an air-conditioned room.
Heat-related impacts are possible Tuesday for most people if simple precautions are not taken. Plan to take action to reduce time outdoors, drink plenty water, and remain in air-conditioned buildings. Heat-sensitive groups, such as the elderly, young children, and those with chronic ailments may need assistance to avoid heat-related illness. As always, never, ever leave a child or pet in an enclosed automobile.
Heat-related impacts are possible Tuesday through Thursday for most people if simple precautions are not taken. Plan to take action to reduce time outdoors, drink plenty water, and remain in air-conditioned buildings. Heat-sensitive groups, such as the elderly, young children, and those with chronic ailments may need assistance to avoid heat-related illness. As always, never, ever leave a child or pet in an enclosed automobile.
With the first heat wave of the calendar year looming, rivers and streams in Central California may look inviting, but can be quite dangerous to those who enter. Rivers and streams are still being fed by melting snow over the higher elevations of the Sierra Nevada, while reservoirs that are nearly full are releasing large volumes of water. Therefore, rivers and streams will continue to run cold, deep, and swift through at least the next several days, resulting in potentially life-threatening hazards. Brief exposure to the cold water of a river or stream may lead to hypothermia. Swift currents can quickly exhaust even an experienced swimmer and carry them into rocks, trees, and other vegetation within the river channel. Bottom line is that rivers and streams are dangerous places to seek cooling relief from the heat. Venturing into them cam result in drowning or water rescue.

 

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Publications and Weather Highlights
 
Publications by NWS San Joaquin Valley Personnel

Technical Attachments are documents written by NWS Personnel describing different aspects of weather or to improve forecasting techniques. A complete list of these publications can be found on the Western Region Homepage. Below is a list of TM'sTA'sand TA Lites written by our office personnel. 
 
TA # Title Author
98-07 The Lemoore Naval Air Station Classic Supercell Tornado of 22 November 1996 Ray Kruzdlo
98-12 VR/SHEAR Interpretation Ray Kruzdlo
98-35 San Joaquin Valley Hail Event - December 13, 1995 Bob Nester
L03-15 Evaluation of KHNX WSR-88D Storm-Relative Velocity Products During A Tornadic Thunderstorm Jeffrey Nesmith
L03-40 Use of Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) During a High Bouyancy / Low Shear Severe Thunderstorm Outbreak in the Central California Interior David Spector
03-09 The Application of Upper Level Heights in Diagnosing and Forecasting San Joaquin Valley Dense Fog Episodes Mark Burger
L03-48 An Analysis of the December 16, 2002 Grapevine Wind Event Mark Burger
04-06 The Prediction of Minimum Overnight Visibilities at the Fresno-Yosemite International Airport Utilizing Multiple Linear Regression Mark Burger
L04-18 A Southern Sierra Nevada Flash Flood Event Resulting from Monsoonal Convection Mark Burger
L05-04 The Unusual Frost Event of November 29 to December 4, 2004 Dan Gudgel
05-04 Pre-Frontal San Joaquin Valley Wind Events and the Use of Surface and Upper Air Data to Facilitate Their Prediction Mark Burger
L06-10 An Anaysis of a Heavy Precipitation Event Over Interior South-Central California Jeffrey Meyers and Larry Greiss
  An Analysis of the 7 July 2004 Rockwell Pass, CA Tornado: Highest Elevation Tornado Documented in the U.S. John P. Monteverdi, Roger Edwards,
Gregory A. Stumpf and Dan Gudgel
L07-08 El Nino and La Nina Episodes and Their Impact on the Weather in Interior Central California Christopher Stachelski
TM280 The Climate of Fresno, California Christopher Stachelski and Gary Sanger
TM281 The Climate of Bakersfield, California Christopher Stachelski and Gary Sanger
L14-04 Tornado Statistics for the WFO San Joaquin Valley-Hanford County Warning Area Gary Sanger and Jimmy Andersen