National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Monsoonal Moisture Persists Across the Southwest; Heat Remains for the South and West Coast

Persistent monsoonal moisture will affect portions of the four corners region that might generate isolated flooding, especially near burn scars. Heat persists across the South, including the middle and lower Mississippi River Valley, while temperatures also climb for much of the west coast. Read More >

Heat Advisory is in effect for the San Joaquin Valley, West Side Hills, Sierra Nevada foothills and the Lake Isabella area from 12 PM PDT Today until 9 PM PDT Monday evening. Heat sensitive people and those who are new to the area will be most prone to heat illness. Dehydration and prolonged exposure or strenuous physical activity outdoors during the hottest time of day could lead to heat exhaustion and/or heat stroke. If you have to be outside during the afternoon, wear sunscreen, drink plenty of water, and wear light colored, loose fitting clothing.
A few strong thunderstorms are possible in the Sierra Nevada from Sequoia National Park northward this afternoon. Dangerous cloud to ground lightning strikes, wind gusts near 45 mph, and small hail are hazards associated with strong thunderstorms.
Hot temperatures expected across most of Central California this weekend, so remember to practice heat safety. Limit outdoor activities and drink plenty of water.
Widespread triple digit heat is expected in the San Joaquin Valley this afternoon, Sunday afternoon, and Monday afternoon. A Heat Advisory is in place for the San Joaquin Valley (and adjacent foothills) during the mentioned time frame.

 

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San Joaquin Valley/Hanford Weather Service Forecast Office


 

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What is Skywarn?

The effects of severe weather are felt every year by many Americans. To obtain critical weather information, NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, established SKYWARN® with partner organizations. SKYWARN® is a volunteer program with nearly 290,000 trained severe weather spotters. These volunteers help keep their local communities safe by providing timely and accurate reports of severe weather to the National Weather Service. Although SKYWARN® spotters provide essential information for all types of weather hazards, the main responsibility of a SKYWARN® spotter is to identify and describe severe local storms. In the average year, 10,000 severe thunderstorms, 5,000 floods and more than 1,000 tornadoes occur across the United States. These events threatened lives and property. Since the program started in the 1970s, the information provided by SKYWARN® spotters, coupled with Doppler radar technology, improved satellite and other data, has enabled NWS to issue more timely and accurate warnings for tornadoes, severe thunderstorms and flash floods.

SKYWARN® storm spotters are part of the ranks of citizens who form the Nation's first line of defense against severe weather. There can be no finer reward than to know that their efforts have given communities the precious gift of time--seconds and minutes that can help save lives. While the main role of a storm spotter is to be their community's first line of defense against dangerous storms, they also provide important information to NWS warning forecasters who make critical warning decisions. Storm spotters play a critical role because they can see things that radar and other technological tools cannot, and this ground truth is critical in helping the NWS perform our primary mission, to save lives and property.