National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Active Weather for the Rockies; Southern Plains Storm Taking Shape

Snow showers, squalls and strong winds will affect portions of the Cascades and Rockies through Wednesday. Meanwhile, a developing storm across the Southern Plains will track toward the Great Lakes into Thursday as severe thunderstorms, flash flooding and strong winds are forecast for the Mid-Lower Mississippi Valley. Heavy snow is possible for the Upper Midwest and wintry mix for the Northeast. Read More >

High temperatures throughout Central California Wednesday afternoon will be a couple of degrees warmer than this afternoon. By Friday afternoon, maximum temperatures across Central California will be around five degrees above normal for this time of year.
High temperatures throughout Central California Saturday afternoon will be around ten degrees cooler than Friday afternoon.
A Dense Fog Advisory is in effect for a portion of the San Joaquin Valley from 2 AM PST tonight until 10 AM PST Wednesday morning. A Dense Fog Advisory means that visibilities will frequently be reduced to less than one quarter of a mile. If driving, slow down, use low beam headlights, and keep plenty of distance between your vehicle and the vehicle in front of you. Highways affected include, but are not limited to Highway 43, Highway 41, Highway 99 north of Pixley, and Highway 198 from Visalia to Lemoore.
A Dense Fog Advisory is in effect for part of the San Joaquin Valley from 2 AM PST tonight until 10 AM PST Wednesday morning, resulting in a high transportation risk. Highways affected include, but are not limited to Highway 43, Highway 41, Highway 99 north of Pixley, and Highway 198 from Visalia to Lemoore.

 

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San Joaquin Valley/Hanford Weather Service Forecast Office


 

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What is Skywarn?

The effects of severe weather are felt every year by many Americans. To obtain critical weather information, NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, established SKYWARN® with partner organizations. SKYWARN® is a volunteer program with nearly 290,000 trained severe weather spotters. These volunteers help keep their local communities safe by providing timely and accurate reports of severe weather to the National Weather Service. Although SKYWARN® spotters provide essential information for all types of weather hazards, the main responsibility of a SKYWARN® spotter is to identify and describe severe local storms. In the average year, 10,000 severe thunderstorms, 5,000 floods and more than 1,000 tornadoes occur across the United States. These events threatened lives and property. Since the program started in the 1970s, the information provided by SKYWARN® spotters, coupled with Doppler radar technology, improved satellite and other data, has enabled NWS to issue more timely and accurate warnings for tornadoes, severe thunderstorms and flash floods.

SKYWARN® storm spotters are part of the ranks of citizens who form the Nation's first line of defense against severe weather. There can be no finer reward than to know that their efforts have given communities the precious gift of time--seconds and minutes that can help save lives. While the main role of a storm spotter is to be their community's first line of defense against dangerous storms, they also provide important information to NWS warning forecasters who make critical warning decisions. Storm spotters play a critical role because they can see things that radar and other technological tools cannot, and this ground truth is critical in helping the NWS perform our primary mission, to save lives and property.