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Social Media: Summer Recreation (Summer)
#WeatherReady

 

Please help the NWS spread these messages on social media! Everyone is welcome to use the text and images provided below to help the NWS build a Weather-Ready Nation.

Heat Exhaustion or Heat Stroke?

Facebook
During hot and humid weather, your body's ability to cool itself is challenged in ways you may not expect. When your body heats too rapidly, or when too much fluid or salt is lost through dehydration or sweating, you may experience a heat-related illness. Stay Weather-Ready by learning the symptoms of excessive heat exposure and the appropriate responses.
weather.gov/safety/heat-illness

Twitter
During hot and humid weather, your body's ability to cool itself is challenged in ways you may not expect. Stay #WeatherReady by learning the symptoms of excessive heat exposure and the appropriate responses.
weather.gov/safety/heat-illness

Heat Exhaustion vs Heat Stroke. Symptoms of heat exhaustion include dizziness, thirst, heavy sweating, nausea, and weakness. Act fast by moving to a cooler area, loosening clothing, sipping cool water. Seek medical help if symptoms don't improve. Heat exhaustion can lead to heat stroke. Symptoms of heat stroke include confusion, dizzines, and becoming unconscious. Act fast by calling 911, moving the person to a cooler area, loosening clothing and removing extra layers, and cooling with water or ice. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not given.

 

Air Quality and Health

Facebook
Outdoor exercise from gardening to team sports can help keep you heart-healthy and less at risk to poor air quality. But before you go out, check the air quality forecast to ensure you aren't doing yourself more harm than good.
airnow.gov

Twitter
Outdoor exercise from gardening to team sports can help keep you heart-healthy and less at risk to poor air quality. But before you go out, check the air quality forecast to ensure you aren't doing yourself more harm than good. #WeatherReady
airnow.gov

Air Quality and Health: Exposure to air pollutants such as particulate matter and ground-level ozone can cause headaches, irritated eyes and sinuses, fatigue, difficulty breathing, chest pains, asthma attacks, irritated throat and increased coughing. Poor air quality can be hazardous to anyone, and it can aggravate health problems such as asmtha, heart disease, and lung disease. Seniors, children and those with compromised immune systems are especially at risk.

 

The Air Quality Index

Facebook
Air quality is reported using the Air Quality Index (AQI). Do you know what these numbers and their corresponding levels mean? View the chart below to find out. To see the current air quality in your area, visit airnow.gov

Twitter
Air quality is reported using the Air Quality Index (AQI). Do you know what these numbers and their corresponding levels mean? View the chart below to find out. To see the current air quality in your area, visit airnow.gov. #WeatherReady

Understanding the Air Quality Index (AQI). Good is AQI 0-50, no health impacts expected. Moderate is AQI 51-100, very sensitive people may wish to limit outdoor exertion. Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups is AQI 101-150, sensitive people should limit outdoor exertion. Unhealthy is AQI 151-200, everyone should limit exertion outdoors. Very Unhealthy is AQI 201-300, sensitive people should avoid all outdoor activity. Hazardous is AQI 301-500, everyone should avoid all outdoor activity.

 

Know Before You Go (fishing)

Facebook
A LOT can change with the weather between when you leave the shore and when you're out on the open water. Know before you go! Stay Weather-Ready by checking the forecast before enjoying any outdoor activity. weather.gov

Twitter
A LOT can change with the weather between when you leave the shore and when you're out on the open water. Know before you go! Stay #WeatherReady by checking the forecast before enjoying any outdoor activity. weather.gov

Know Before You Go! Don't get lured by a clear sky. Check weather.gov to catch the forecast and know if lightning, strong winds, or other hazards could be heading your way.

 

Know Before You Go (great outdoors)

Facebook
We’ve all seen those days when a beautiful morning takes a nasty turn. Empower yourself and your friends by being Weather-Ready. Check the forecast before enjoying any outdoor activity. Know before you go! weather.gov

Twitter
We’ve all seen those days when a beautiful morning takes a nasty turn. Empower yourself and your friends by being #WeatherReady. Check the forecast before enjoying any outdoor activity. Know before you go! weather.gov

Know Before You Go! A clear sky doesn't mean you're out of the woods. Check weather.gov to know if extreme heat, storms, or other hazards could be on the horizon.

 

One Strike, You're Out

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Lightning strikes can result in death or serious injury. If you hear thunder or see lightning, take shelter in an enclosed building or a hard-topped vehicle with the windows up. weather.gov

Twitter
Lightning strikes can result in death or serious injury. If you hear thunder or see lightning, take shelter in an enclosed building or a hard-topped vehicle with the windows up. weather.gov
#WeatherReady

One Strike, You're Out. When thunder roars, go indoors. Pictured: lightning striking near a baseball field.

 

Chances of being struck by lightning

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Each year in the United States, thunderstorms produce 20-25 million lightning flashes that strike the ground, killing an average of 20+ people and injuring hundreds more - often in devastating and permanent ways. weather.gov

Twitter
Each year in the United States, thunderstorms produce 20-25 million lightning flashes that strike the ground, killing an average of 20+ people and injuring hundreds more - often in devastating and permanent ways. weather.gov #WeatherReady

Your chance of being struck by lightning greatly increases when remaining outdoors during a thunderstorm. Lightning can strike from up to 10 miles away. Some of the activities people were doing when they were recently struck by lightning include golfing, boating, running, grilling, walking, construction, riding, gardening, and swimming. When thunder roars, go indoors!  See a flash, dash inside!

 

Weather-Ready for the Beach?

Facebook
You’re ready for the beach, but are you Weather-Ready? Be prepared for, and know how to react to, weather and water hazards such as rip currents & dangerous waves, excessive heat, and lightning. weather.gov

Twitter
You’re ready for the beach, but are you #WeatherReady? Be prepared for, and know how to react to, weather and water hazards such as rip currents & dangerous waves, excessive heat, and lightning. weather.gov

Weather-Ready for the Beach? 1. Rip currents & dangerous waves: Swim at beaches with lifeguards, and never swim alone. If caught in a rip, don't panic, call for help, and swim along the shore. Supervise young or inexperienced swimmers. 2. Excessive Heat: Remain hydrated. Wear light, loose-fitting clothing and use sunscreen. Relax in the shade and cool off in the water. 3. Lightning: If you hear thunder or see lightning, go immediately to an enclosed building or hard-topped vehicle.

 

Weather-Ready for Nature?

Facebook
You’re ready for the great outdoors, but are you Weather-Ready? Be prepared for, and know how to react to, weather and water hazards such as flash flooding, excessive heat, and lightning.
As always, knowing the forecast is critical to preparation too. Visit weather.gov.

Twitter
You’re ready for the great outdoors, but are you #WeatherReady? Be prepared for, and know how to react to, weather and water hazards such as flash flooding, excessive heat, and lightning.
As always, knowing the forecast is critical to preparation too. Visit weather.gov.

Weather-Ready for Nature? 1. Flash flooding: Heavy rainfall can cause flooding in a flash. Use caution when hiking in canyons or camping near streams and rivers. 2. Excessive Heat: Bring extra water and remain hydrated. Use sunscreen and wear light, loose-fitting clothing. Take breaks in the shade. 3. Lightning: If you hear thunder or see lightning, go immediately to an enclosed building or hard-topped vehicle (if possible). Avoid isolated tall trees or ridge tops.

 

Weather-Ready for Boating?

Facebook
You’re ready for time on the water, but are you Weather-Ready? Be prepared for, and know how to react to, weather hazards such as strong winds, lightning, and fog. weather.gov

Twitter
You’re ready for time on the water, but are you #WeatherReady? Be prepared for, and know how to react to, weather hazards such as strong winds, lightning, and fog. weather.gov

Weather-Ready for Boating? 1. Strong Winds: Dangerous wind can arrive well before the rain. Reduce speed and head to shore if alerted to high wind. Always wear a life jacket when on a boat. 2. Lightning: If you hear thunder or see lightning, it's time to stay in the cabin or head to shore. 3. Fog: If fog forms, slow down and turn on your lights. Listen for other boats around you or check radar.

 

Weather-Ready for Sports?

Facebook
You’re ready to play sports, but are you Weather-Ready? Be prepared for, and know how to react to, weather hazards such as heat, air quality, and lightning. weather.gov

Twitter
You’re ready to play sports, but are you #WeatherReady? Be prepared for, and know how to react to, weather hazards such as heat, air quality, and lightning. weather.gov

Weather-Ready for Outdoor Sports? 1. Heat: Wear light, loose-fitting clothing, stay hydrated and take breaks in the shade. During excessive heat, avoid heavy activity and direct sunlight. 2. Air Quality: Stay inside during air quality alerts. Children, seniors, and those with health problems are especially at risk. 3. Lightning: If you hear thunder or see lightning, go immediately to an enclosed building or hard-topped vehicle.