National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Protect all the skin you’re in. Use a Layered Approach for Sun Protection. Sunscreen works best when used with shade or clothes, and it must be re-applied every 2 hours and after swimming, sweating, or toweling off. Wear a hat, sunglasses, and protective clothing to shield skin. Use broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15 to protect exposed skin. Seek shade, especially during midday hours.

 

UV index values for the following cities:

Bloomington

Champaign

Danville

Decatur

Effingham

Galesburg

Jacksonville

Lawrenceville

Mattoon Peoria Rushville Springfield

 

 

 

About the UV Index:

The National Weather Service works with the Environmental Protection Agency, to forecast the Ultraviolet (UV) Index for the U.S.

The UV index is a measure to help you determine the effects of the sun on outdoor activities.  It is computed using forecast ozone levels, cloudiness, and elevation.  Values are effective at solar noon, which is when the sun is at its highest point of the day.  (Solar noon generally does not correspond to the clock time of 12:00 noon.)  Overexposure during days with high UV values can be harmful, both in the short term and over the long term.  Exposure to surface objects that reflect light (such as sand and water) can make the UV index even higher in such locations.

The UV Index runs on a scale of 1 to 11+:

 

UV Value and Category

Effects

1-2 
("Low")

A UV Index reading of 2 or less means low danger from the sun's UV rays for the average person:

  • Wear sunglasses on bright days. In winter, reflection off snow can nearly double UV strength.
  • If you burn easily, cover up and use sunscreen of at least SPF-30.

3-5
("Moderate")

A UV Index reading of 3 to 5 means moderate risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure.

  • Take precautions, such as covering up, wearing a hat and sunglasses, if you will be outside. Use sunscreen of at least SPF-30.
  • Stay in shade near midday when the sun is strongest.

6-7
("High")

A UV Index reading of 6 to 7 means high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Protection against sun damage is needed.

  • Reduce time in the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • Cover up, wear a hat and sunglasses, and use sunscreen with a SPF of at least 30.

8-10
("Very High")

A UV Index reading of 8 to 10 means very high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Protection against sun damage is needed. 

  • Take extra precautions. Wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, use sunscreen of at least SPF-30, and wear a long-sleeved shirt and pants if practical. 
  • Minimize sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • White sand on the beach will reflect UV rays and can double UV exposure.

11+
("Extreme")

A UV Index reading of 11 or higher means extreme risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Try to avoid sun exposure during midday hours, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Apply sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 liberally every 2 hours.

  • Take all precautions. Unprotected skin can burn in minutes. Beachgoers should know that white sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and will increase UV exposure.
  • Try to avoid sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • Seek shade, cover up, wear a hat and sunglasses, and use sunscreen.

Remember that the UV values over reflective surfaces (such as white sand, snow cover, and water) can increase these values.

By visiting the EPA's Sunwise page at https://www.epa.gov/sunsafety , you can get UV index values for other locations by entering specific cities or ZIP codes.  You can also access nationwide maps of UV index values for the next 4 days.