National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Understanding the weather and how certain weather events can lead to flash flooding, stream flooding, and river flooding is the first step in becoming better prepared the next time it rains… a lot.  We have collected links that may help you to become more aware and better prepared for flooding the next time it happens.

 

We start with a video series on the latest advancement in weather imaging and interpretation, the GOES-R satellite.  We then present a list of links geared to our youngest weather watchers and progress with more in depth links and information for older kids ending with links for those who may have an interest in careers in the weather, hydrologic, or environmental fields.

 

The Middle Atlantic River Forecast Center is committed to the hydrologic aspect of weather.  Whether it is a flood or drought, these links tend to lean more toward this aspect of the weather spectrum.

 

GOES-16 links

Nurture Nature Center

Kindergarten through Grade 4

4th through 6th Grade

Middle School

High School

Careers and Professional Organizations

 

 

GOES –16 links:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGcqxlihy4Y

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3Uo859ktM8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3J1r8rWWzZc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_3161642435&feature=iv&src_vid=ttOHhnBwukU&v=6Q7Leqvzfg4

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Nurture Nature Center:

The Nurture Nature Center (NNC) is a center dedicated to engaging the public in learning about environmental risks.

http://nurturenaturecenter.org/

http://focusonfloods.org/

http://focusonfloods.org/resources/

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Kindergarten through Grade 4:

Owlie Skywarn:

https://www.weather.gov/owlie/

 

NOAA Awareness Information:

 

· Awareness/Safety Owlie Game:

http://youngmeteorologist.org/game/index.html

This game includes:

Hurricane Challenge

Lightning Challenge

Flood Challenge

Tornado Challenge

Winter Storm Challenge

 

· SciJinks. It’s all about weather:

https://scijinks.gov/

 

SciJinks – Science HiJinks –

NOAA/ NASA Kids Activity:

Water Works on a Blue Planet

A fun exercise that uses either a poster or a mural to show different ways water is transported through the water cycle.

See: Water Works on a Blue Planet at the bottom of the page

http://scijinks.gov/classroom-activities/

 

· Severe Weather Safety:

 

Flooding -

Links for preparedness for a flooding event

https://www.weather.gov/safety/flood

 

NOAA’s National Ocean Service Water Cycle Video

A great video discussing the water cycle

http://oceantoday.noaa.gov/watercycle/

 

NOAA Water Cycle Intro

Basic introduction of the water cycle

http://www.noaa.gov/resource-collections/water-cycle

 

NOAA’s National Ocean Service Office of coastal management

A great kid friendly presentation on the water cycle

https://coast.noaa.gov/psc/sea/content/water-cycle.html

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4th through 6th Grade:

UCAR – Community Program

Climate Change and Sea Level RiseRequires generating a free account

This module looks at how increasing temperatures due to climate change have affected sea level rise and what effects scientist expect in the future, given rising greenhouse gas emissions. The various mechanisms of sea level rise are discussed, as well as the tools and research used to study this topic. The module also discusses how countries and communities are preparing for future increases in sea levels.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=974#.W9nnfjFRdpg

 

Public Broadcasting:

PBS Learning Media

Groundwater Beneath the Surface

This lighthearted animation takes us beneath the surface to see groundwater in action. Watch anthropomorphized drops of groundwater travel through this system. A smiling character with a shovel digs us down to the water table, allowing us to flow through the water cycle and thus making the process much easier to understand.

https://ny.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/20196d0e-5cab-408c-8ee0-9141a7d28b83/groundwater-beneath-the-surface/

 

PBS Learning Media

What is an Aquifer?

Aquifers are bodies of saturated rock and sediment through which water can move, and they provide 99% of our groundwater. Humans rely on aquifers for most of our drinking water. However, we are not only depleting this supply but are its biggest polluters as well. This infographic provides facts and illustrations to explain the process.

https://ny.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/94cf16a4-dd62-4aba-a1b4-0e75d17aa17b/what-is-an-aquifer/

 

PBS Learning Media

Water Cycle

This short video segment from IdahoPTV's D4K explains how the water cycle works, in moving water from the ocean to the clouds, around the earth and back to the ocean.

https://ny.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/idptv11.sci.ess.watcyc.d4kwcy/water-cycle/

 

PBS Learning Media

Water

This video segment from IdahoPTV's Science Trek informs us that only 3% of all the water on earth is fresh water, but most of that is frozen. Only .3% is available for use. See how the power of a river formed Hells Canyon on the Snake River in Idaho. Learn why it's important to conserve water.

https://ny.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/idptv11.sci.ess.earthsys.d4kwat/water/

 

NOAA:

NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration

Explore an ocean's -worth of information related to our efforts to protect and restore the nation's waters from pollution. You'll find experiments and activities for elementary school students and life-long learners alike.  We hope the information here helps inspire you and others to further investigate and preserve our incredible marine resources.

http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/training-and-education/education-students-and-teachers

 

NOAA’s Habitat Conservation | Habitat Protection:

10 Things you can do for Coastal Wetlands

http://www.habitat.noaa.gov/protection/wetlands/whatyoucando.html

 

NOAA’s Climate Global Warming Frequently Asked Questions

https://www.climate.gov/news-features/understanding-climate/global-warming-frequently-asked-questions

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Middle School:

NOAA

Climate monitoring

Step outside and you can learn a lot about your local weather, but what does it tell you about your climate?

http://www.noaa.gov/resource-collections/climate-monitoring

 

UCAR – Community Program

Climate Change and Regional ImpactsRequires generating a free account

This short module is an overview of the different effects climate change produces in different regions of the United States. In addition to discussing impacts already being experienced, the module presents information on how climate scientists use specialized models and statistical techniques to estimate how regional climates are likely to change in the future.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=972#.W-M_gWZRdpg

 

UCAR – Community Program

Climate Change and Sea Level RiseRequires generating a free account

This module looks at how increasing temperatures due to climate change have affected sea level rise and what effects scientist expect in the future, given rising greenhouse gas emissions. The various mechanisms of sea level rise are discussed, as well as the tools and research used to study this topic. The module also discusses how countries and communities are preparing for future increases in sea levels.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=974#.W-M_62ZRdpg

 

UCAR – Community Program

Climate Change: Fitting the Pieces TogetherRequires generating a free account

This module discusses climate change, particularly as it is currently being affected by increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases emitted by human activities. It also covers signs of climate change, how scientists study climate, the current thinking on future changes, and what can be done to minimize the effects.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=522#.W-NDtWZRdpg

 

UCAR – Community Program

Climate Change and Extreme WeatherRequires generating a free account

This module discusses how a changing climate can also lead to changes in extreme weather events on the local scale. The role of natural variability is also explained. The module describes how climate change can have both positive and negative effects, depending on the situation, location, and the vulnerability of the population. While research on climate change and extreme events is still relatively new, the module discusses what changes scientists think are likely if greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=973#.W-NEBWZRdpg

 

Science Hijinks – SciJinks – NOAA/NASA Education

What makes it rain?  The water cycle and how snow, hail, and sleet form by the energy from the sun.

This website explains how it rains.

http://scijinks.gov/rain/

 

NOAA

Ocean Currents

Ocean water is on the move, affecting your climate, your local ecosystem, and the seafood that you eat.

Ocean currents, abiotic features of the environment, are continuous and directed movements of ocean water. These currents are on the ocean’s surface and in its depths, flowing both locally and globally.  This website provides a brief overview about ocean currents.

http://www.noaa.gov/resource-collections/ocean-currents

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High School:

NOAA

Carbon Cycle

Basic introduction to the Carbon Cycle

http://www.noaa.gov/resource-collections/carbon-cycle

 

NOAA

NOAA Paleoclimatology

How would you characterize the climate in your backyard? How do current weather conditions compare with climate over the past 30 years, 100 years or 1000 years? Have changes in climate conditions over time influenced stream or river flows? The Data Access page provides you with online resources to help you answer these questions and more. Check out the learning activity "Distribution of Climates on the Earth" developed by Dr. Heather Stoll at Williams College.

https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/ctl/data.html#

 

NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory

Global Monitoring Division

This toolkit was designed to support educators in teaching the fundamental scientific concepts of climate change. A significant challenge to teaching climate change lies in the abstract nature of the most basic concepts underlying climate science. For instance, the intangible nature of greenhouse gases makes it difficult for students to conceive of their existence and increasing abundances. Recent trends in greenhouse gas concentrations are well understood due to ongoing, accurate and precise measurements around the globe, yet the certainty and relevancy behind this science is still misconceived by the general public.

https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/education/carbon_toolkit/

 

NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory

Global Monitoring Division

Teacher Background: Understanding Feedback loops

This is a great document that discusses feedback loops and their direct effects on Earth’s climate.

https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/education/info_activities/pdfs/TBI_understanding_feedback_loops.pdf

 

NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory

Physical Sciences Division

Clouds and Climate

Clouds play a vital role in our climate by regulating the amount of solar energy that reaches the surface and the amount of the Earth's energy that is radiated back into space. The more energy that is trapped by the planet, the warmer our climate will grow. If less energy is collected, the climate will become cooler. Understanding this energy balance is fundamental to answering any of the questions posed by climate change.

https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/outreach/education/science/clouds_and_climate.html

 

NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory

Global Monitoring Division

Teacher Background: Earth’s Atmosphere

This is a great document providing a thorough description of the atmosphere.

https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/education/info_activities/pdfs/TBI_earths_atmosphere.pdf

 

NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory

Global Monitoring Division

Frequently asked questions about climate change

https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/education/faq_cat-1.html

 

NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory

Global Monitoring Division

Teacher Background: Natural Climate Change

The natural variability and the climate fluctuations of the climate system have always been part of the Earth’s history. To understand climate change fully, the causes of climate change must be first identified. The earth’s climate is influenced and changed through natural causes like volcanic eruptions, ocean currents, the Earth’s orbital changes, solar variations and internal variability.

https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/education/info_activities/pdfs/TBI_natural_climate_change.pdf

 

UCAR – Community Program

Climate Change: Fitting the Pieces TogetherRequires generating a free account

This module discusses climate change, particularly as it is currently being affected by increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases emitted by human activities. It also covers signs of climate change, how scientists study climate, the current thinking on future changes, and what can be done to minimize the effects.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=522#.W-REH2ZRdpg

 

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

Interactive Energy & Climate Simulation – Game

Written Instructions Below – Video on website

Earth is facing a large problem that we need energy more and more each year. We have mainly been relying on oil and coal, but these are major contributors to Green House gasses. What can we do to keep up with our energy requirements and not turn our planet into a giant dessert? It is up to you to decide! In this simulation, LLNL used the most powerful super computers to combine to the most up-to-date climate models and energy data, and you will use this info to produce enough energy to meet the world’s needs for the next few decades. You begin with a fixed amount of money and you need to decide how to spend it using a mix of different energy sources, so me are more expensive than others, for example each unit of oil and coal is cheaper than wind and nuclear, but you need to keep an eye on your carbon eye print. Relying completely on coal isn’t a good idea, because of how much carbon is emitted into the atmosphere. On the right side, you see how much energy you need to produce for each decade both for transportation needs and for electricity. Keep in mind that some energy sources only work for electricity not transportation and vice versa. The red column on the left shows you how much carbon you are producing into the atmosphere. You can reduce the amount by using some of your money on carbon capture on the bottom left. After each decades worth of play something unexpected will happen in your world a spinning wheel will randomly produce good or bad luck to the energy picture which will affect your game play. Remember the object of the game is to produce the required level of energy with the available money at hand, while keeping the amount of carbon emissions low enough to avoid climate change.  Scroll down to the bottom of the place and click “Play: Climate Energy Fusion Simulation”

https://camelclimatechange.org/camel/activities/game_climateene.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Carbon Footprint Calculator

Find a quick rough estimate of your carbon footprint by using U.S. average values.

https://www3.epa.gov/carbon-footprint-calculator/

 

NOAA’s NWS Climate Prediction Center (CPC)

CPC delivers real-time products and information that predict and describe climate variations on timescales from weeks to years thereby promoting effective management of climate risk and a climate-resilient society.  The CPC products are operational predictions of climate variability, real-time monitoring of climate and the required data bases, and assessments of the origins of major climate anomalies. The products cover time scales from a week to seasons, extending into the future as far as technically feasible, and cover the land, the ocean, and the atmosphere, extending into the stratosphere.

http://www.cpc.noaa.gov/

 

Developed by multiple agencies and across the world – For info please see Conditions of Use

The Global Calculator

The Global Calculator is a model of the world's energy, land and food systems to 2050. It allows you to explore the world's options for tackling climate change and see how they all add up. With the Calculator, you can find out whether everyone can have a good lifestyle while also tackling climate change.

http://tool.globalcalculator.org/globcalc.html

 

UCAR – Community Program

Introduction to Climate ModelsRequires generating a free account

This module explains how climate models work. Because the modeling of both weather and climate share many similarities, the content throughout this module draws frequent comparisons and highlights the differences. We explain not only how, but why climate models differ from weather models. To do so, we explore the difference between weather and climate, then show how models are built to simulate climate and generate the statistics that describe it. We conclude with a discussion of models are tuned and tested.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=913#.W-RHD2ZRdpg

 

UCAR – Community Program

Climate Change and Regional ImpactsRequires generating a free account

This short module is an overview of the different effects climate change produces in different regions of the United States. In addition to discussing impacts already being experienced, the module presents information on how climate scientists use specialized models and statistical techniques to estimate how regional climates are likely to change in the future.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=972#.W-RHbGZRdpg

 

Check here for a comprehensive list of hydrology training options. Some of the more relevant ones are listed below this link.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_list.php?topicSorting=9&pagination=no

 

COMET – MetEd

Urban Flooding: It Can Happen in a Flash!

This module features an audio and visual tour of sites affected by the Fort Collins, Colorado urban flood that occurred on 28 July 1997. The tour is led by Matthew Kelsch and includes eyewitness accounts of that night's events from John Weaver. This interactive virtual field trip module summarizes many of the important common aspects of flash floods occurring in urban environments.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=34#.W9HI-jFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Understanding the Hydrologic Cycle

This module helps students gain a basic understanding of the elements of the hydrologic cycle. Making use of illustrations, animations, and interactions, this module examines the basic concepts of the hydrologic cycle including water distribution, atmospheric water, surface water, groundwater, and snowpack/snowmelt.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=182#.W9HImDFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Understanding the Hydrologic Cycle: International Edition

This module helps students gain a basic understanding of the elements of the hydrologic cycle. The hydrologic cycle is the continuous movement and phase change of liquid water, ice, and water vapor above, on, under and through the earth's surface. This module examines the basic concepts of the hydrologic cycle including water distribution, atmospheric water, surface water, groundwater, and snowpack/snowmelt.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=791#.W9HFijFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Watersheds: Connecting Weather to the Environment

This short course provides broadcast meteorologists with knowledge and instructional materials to help them understand watersheds as our environmental home and to help their viewers understand the relationship between the weather and the health and protection of the environment. Environmental impacts in many areas of the country result from the daily actions of people. We can easily see the consequences of a major oil spill at sea that is driven ashore by winds and ocean currents, but what about the fertilizer that people put on their lawns and the de-icer they apply to their driveway, or changing the car’s oil in the backyard, or the pet waste in the yard or local park? Combined with weather, all of these have an impact on both the local environment and the larger regional environment.
This short course takes a story-telling approach through the use of movie-like sequences of audio and imagery to show how the concept of a watershed can be related to local concerns and to connect it to people in a personal way. The goal of this course is to:

Provide an understanding of a watershed as the local environment in which people’s actions and decisions play against the background of daily and seasonal weather to affect the quality and health of their local watershed as well as the larger system of watersheds of which their watershed is one part.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=218#.W9HJXDFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Dam Failure Concepts and Modeling

This lesson provides an in-depth case study to illustrate principles of dam failure modeling and examines some of the critical data inputs and outputs. Output is provided from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC-RAS model for simulated failures of a large dam. Several simulations are presented that show the impact from varying the size of the breach and the time it takes the breach to fully develop. The lesson also summarizes several infamous large dam failures from around the world and the impacts from other factors are such as reservoir shape and size, the age of the dam, and the material used to construct the dam.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=1270#.W9G_hzFRdpg

 

 

COMET – MetEd

Climate and Water Resources Management, Part 2: General Principles in Integrating Climate Change

This lesson describes a common approach used by the United States Bureau of Reclamation to scope a study on integrating climate change information into water resources management and planning. Learners will become familiar with the types of questions that must be addressed for considering climate change impacts when scoping their study. Examples are given for several different water resources mission areas. Note that this is the second of a two lesson series, the first one is titled, "Climate and Water Resources Management, Part 1: Climate Variability and Change."

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=1245#.W9HAKDFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Overview of Watershed and Channel Sedimentation

This lesson provides an overview of the primary influences of watershed and channel sedimentation. In a short narrated portion of the lesson, we explore a section of the Rio Grande watershed and channel in New Mexico using Google Earth imagery, river profiles, and graphic animations. We highlight features of the upland catchments, the river channel, and the Elephant Butte Reservoir. We then demonstrate how environmental factors (climate, geography, land use changes, reservoirs) impact the supply and movement of sediments for the Rio Grande and other rivers. The focus is on the three primary processes in sedimentation: generation, transport, and deposition. The lesson then addresses natural climate and weather influences along with some observed and projected trends associated with climate change.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=1123#.W9HBEjFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Flood Forecasting Case Study: International Edition

This module allows users to explore the flood forecasting process by assuming the role of a visiting hydrologist intern at the National Hydrologic Service in Main Country. Fictional senior hydrologists guide the intern through an idealized flooding event that takes place over Main Country's Mainstem river basin and its tributary basins, each with varying landscapes and observation systems. Users will examine how these variations impact the quality and type of forecast that can be achieved. Users will also learn about common problems encountered in flood forecasting, and how to adjust forecasts accordingly. This module is intended for a diverse audience that uses a variety of observing and computing technologies, and builds upon material covered in the foundation topics of the International Basic Hydrologic Sciences Course. These core foundation topics are recommended as a prerequisite since this module assumes some pre-existing knowledge of hydrologic principles.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=807#.W9HC8TFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Flash Flood Processes: International Edition

Flash floods can occur in nearly any area of the world. A rainfall-induced flash flood is a truly hydrometeorological event: one that depends on both hydrologic and meteorological conditions. Forecasting flash floods involves a detailed understanding of the local hydrologic features and continual monitoring of the current meteorological situation.

This module examines both the hydrologic and meteorological processes that often contribute to the development of flash flooding. Common tools and technologies that are used in flash flood monitoring and forecasting, from manual gauging systems to complex radar- and satellite-based runoff models, are explored. This module also examines the strengths and limitations of these technologies, as well as how they are likely to advance in the future.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=806#.W9HDbDFRdpg

COMET – MetEd

Snowmelt Processes: International Edition

Snowmelt is an integral component of the hydrologic forecasting process in many parts of the world. Here, we examine the influences of environmental conditions on snowfall distribution, snowpack structure, snowpack-environment energy exchange, and finally, the rate and amount of snowmelt itself. The fate of snowmelt water after it reaches the ground is also explored.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=804#.W9HD2TFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

River Ice Processes - Short Version

This module provides information on flooding associated with river ice jams. Based on a presentation by Dr. Kate White, a nationally-recognized expert on river ice, this webcast explores basic river ice processes including the formation, growth, breakup, and transport of river ice and how it can become jammed, triggering floods. This shorter version of the previously published module "River Ice Processes", has less focus on the US National Weather Service, making it more broadly applicable, including to an international audience.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=809#.W9HGUzFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Runoff Processes: International Edition

The Runoff Processes module offers a thorough introduction to the runoff processes critical for flood and water supply prediction. This module explains key terminology and concepts including the following: types of runoff, paths through which water becomes runoff, basin and soil properties that influence runoff, and numerical runoff modeling. Examples of popular runoff models are also discussed.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=805#.W9HEGzFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Streamflow Routing: International Edition

Streamflow routing provides a set of methods for describing and predicting the movement of water from one point to another along a river. Typically, this process involves predicting the shape of a hydrograph downstream from a particular location in a channel, reservoir, or lake. This first requires an understanding of the basic flow regimes and how water is stored and released within a channel. From there, information and calculations based on flow and channel bed characteristics are implemented in hydrologic routing methods, which are storage-based, and hydraulic routing methods, which utilize fully-dynamic equations. This module offers a thorough introduction to these routing concepts and processes through illustrations, animations and sample exercises, with a primary focus on hydrologic routing methods.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=803#.W9HEczFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Flood Frequency Analysis: International Edition

Flood frequency analysis uses historical flow records to both estimate the frequency with which floods of a certain magnitude may occur and predict the possible flood magnitude over a certain time period. This module offers a thorough introduction to appropriately constructing the necessary historical data series, calculating the flooding probabilities, and gauging the reliability of the resulting probability values. Methods for assessing flood frequency in basins with limited data are also discussed.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=802#.W9HE4zFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Unit Hydrograph Theory: International Edition

The role of unit hydrograph theory in the flood prediction process is to provide an estimate of streamflow that results from a given amount precipitation. A unit hydrograph shows the temporal change in flow, or discharge, per excess unit of precipitation runoff. This module offers a thorough introduction to the use of unit hydrographs and the application of unit hydrograph theory in flood prediction. Key terminology and assumptions, the process of creating a unit hydrograph and application of unit hydrograph theory to forecast situations are all explored through comprehensive animations and interactions.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=792#.W9HF8DFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Precipitation Estimates, Part 1: Measurement

This is part one of a two-module series on estimation of observed precipitation. Through use of rich illustrations, animations, and interactions, this module provides an overview of the science of precipitation estimation using various measuring platforms. First, we define quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) and examine technologies for remote sensing of QPE, including radar and satellite and the strengths and limitations of each. That is followed by an examination of the use of rain gauges for precipitation estimation and important issues to consider with rain gauge measurement. Finally we provide an introduction to the strengths and limitations of using precipitation climatology for QPE including PRISM.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=526#.W9HGwzFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Precipitation Estimates, Part 2: Analysis

This is part two of a two-module series on estimation of observed precipitation. Through the use of rich illustrations, animations, and interactions, this module provides an introduction to the science behind successful application of the products and tools available through the NWS Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) software and related products. An overview is presented of the key fields available in MPE along with illustrations of their use. These include radar, gauge, satellite, bias-adjusted radar, and multisensor fields of precipitation accumulation along with data displays and tables used for evaluating and editing the data. Subsequently, methods for additional data editing with MPE's polygon editing tool are explained, as well as the selection of a best estimate. Finally, a case study section is offered to show how these methods have been applied in the field for a variety of events and locations.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=558#.W9HHFDFRdpg

 

COMET – MetEd

Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting Overview

In this module, Wes Junker, retired Senior Branch Forecaster at NCEP/HPC provides an introduction to Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting. This presentation assumes a familiarity with basic meteorological processes.

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=59#.W9HISjFRdpg

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Careers and Professional Organizations:

 

NWS Careers page: https://www.weather.gov/careers/

 

American Meteorological Society: https://www.ametsoc.org/index.cfm/ams/

 

National Weather Association: http://nwas.org

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