National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Here are your weather headlines for North and Central TX from tonight through Thursday.
Storms will continue to develop overnight and move east northeast across North and Central Texas through Tuesday morning. Heavy rainfall will be the primary hazard.
Showers and thundestorms associated with an upper level trough and an approaching cold front will be on the increase over the next few days. Abundant Gulf moisture will be in place through Wednesday night, which will lead to lovcally heavy rain and possible flooding. A Flood Watch has been issued for areas generally along and east of a line from Sherman to Fort Worth to Waco. The Watch is in effect from Tuesday morning through Wednesday night.
Join us Tuesday, February 20th, for our SKYWARN class in Cooper, Texas (Delta County) at the Delta County Civic Center. We will be hosting the basic session from 6 PM to 8PM. All SKYWARN classes are free and open to all ages. No registration is required!
Join us Tuesday, February 20th, for our SKYWARN class in Glen Rose, Texas (Somervell County) at the Somervell County Fire Department. We will be hosting the basic session from 630 PM to 830PM. All SKYWARN classes are free and open to all ages. No registration is required!

 
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The Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex is located in North Central Texas, approximately 250 miles north of the Gulf of Mexico. It is near the headwaters of the Trinity River, which lie in the upper margins of the Coastal Plain. The rolling hills in the area range from 500 to 800 feet in elevation.

The Dallas-Fort Worth climate is humid subtropical with hot summers. It is also continental, characterized by a wide annual temperature range. Precipitation also varies considerably, ranging from less than 20 to more than 50 inches.

Winters are mild, but northers occur about three times each month, and often are accompanied by sudden drops in temperature. Periods of extreme cold that occasionally occur are short-lived, so that even in January mild weather occurs frequently.

The highest temperatures of summer are associated with fair skies, westerly winds and low humidities. Characteristically, hot spells in summer are broken into three-to-five day periods by thunderstorm activity.

There are only a few nights each summer when the low temperature exceeds 80°F. Summer daytime temperatures frequently exceed 100°F. Air conditioners are recommended for maximum comfort indoors and while traveling via automobile.

Throughout the year, rainfall occurs more frequently during the night. Usually, periods of rainy weather last for only a day or two, and are followed by several days with fair skies.

A large part of the annual precipitation results from thunderstorm activity, with occasional heavy rainfall over brief periods of time. Thunderstorms occur throughout the year, but are most frequent in the spring.

Hail falls on about two or three days a year, ordinarily with only slight and scattered damage. Windstorms occurring during thunderstorm activity are sometimes destructive. Snowfall is rare.

The average length of the warm season (freeze-free period) in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex is about 249 days. The average last occurrence of 32°F or below is mid March and the average first occurrence of 32°F or below is in late November.