National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Turning Stormy in the Northwest

An active fall storm pattern developing in the Pacific Northwest this week will bring areas of heavy rain and high elevation snow. Northern California will benefit from rainfall this week that will aid firefighters given the recent large wildfires. Read More >

Partly cloudy. Increasing cloudiness late across Central Texas. With increasing humidity, low tonight will be in the 50s. Winds will be southeast at 5 to 10 mph.
We will have increasing cloudiness and warm Thursday. Highs in the 80s. Southeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Southerly winds will bring increasing Gulf moisture to the region Thursday through Friday. Low chances of showers and thunderstorms will return Thursday night through Friday evening with the approach of an upper level disturbance. Lows Thursday night will be in the mid 50s to lower 60s and with increasing humidity lows Friday night will be in the 60s area wide. Highs will be in the upper 70s to lower 80s Friday.
There will be a chance of showers and thunderstorms during the day Saturday. The better threat for more organized thunderstorms Saturday evening through Sunday morning ahead of a cold front. Some of these storms may become severe, producing damaging winds and large hail. Locally heavy rain that could result in flooding and cloud to ground lightning will also be possible. Expect gusty northerly winds behind the front that will sweep through the Bowie and Breckenridge areas before midnight and through the Palestine and Cameron areas by late Sunday morning.

 
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The Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex is located in North Central Texas, approximately 250 miles north of the Gulf of Mexico. It is near the headwaters of the Trinity River, which lie in the upper margins of the Coastal Plain. The rolling hills in the area range from 500 to 800 feet in elevation.

The Dallas-Fort Worth climate is humid subtropical with hot summers. It is also continental, characterized by a wide annual temperature range. Precipitation also varies considerably, ranging from less than 20 to more than 50 inches.

Winters are mild, but northers occur about three times each month, and often are accompanied by sudden drops in temperature. Periods of extreme cold that occasionally occur are short-lived, so that even in January mild weather occurs frequently.

The highest temperatures of summer are associated with fair skies, westerly winds and low humidities. Characteristically, hot spells in summer are broken into three-to-five day periods by thunderstorm activity.

There are only a few nights each summer when the low temperature exceeds 80°F. Summer daytime temperatures frequently exceed 100°F. Air conditioners are recommended for maximum comfort indoors and while traveling via automobile.

Throughout the year, rainfall occurs more frequently during the night. Usually, periods of rainy weather last for only a day or two, and are followed by several days with fair skies.

A large part of the annual precipitation results from thunderstorm activity, with occasional heavy rainfall over brief periods of time. Thunderstorms occur throughout the year, but are most frequent in the spring.

Hail falls on about two or three days a year, ordinarily with only slight and scattered damage. Windstorms occurring during thunderstorm activity are sometimes destructive. Snowfall is rare.

The average length of the warm season (freeze-free period) in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex is about 249 days. The average last occurrence of 32°F or below is mid March and the average first occurrence of 32°F or below is in late November.