National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

On This Day In

                   Weather History...

April 17th

Local and Regional Events:

April 17, 2006:

A strong spring storm moved across the Northern and Central Plains, bringing precipitation and unyielding northwest winds. Sustained winds of 30 to 50 mph, with gusts around 70 mph, were felt across a large portion of western South Dakota for more than 24 hours as the storm slowly crossed the region.

 

Local Climate Information:

Click HERE for daily climate information for Aberdeen, Mobridge, Pierre, Sisseton, and Watertown.

Click HERE for daily climate information for Sioux Falls, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux City.

 

U.S.A and Global Events for April 17th:

1922: Southern Illinois and Western Indiana saw two rounds of severe weather, including tornadoes. The first significant tornado occurred just before midnight on the 16th near Oakdale, Illinois. This tornado killed 4 and injured 22 others. Five additional tornadoes took place between midnight and 3 AM on the 17th. During the mid-morning and early afternoon hours, two estimated F4 tornadoes caused devastation in Hedrick and near Orestes in Indiana. A postcard from one farm near Orestes was dropped near Mt. Cory, Ohio, 124 miles away.

The map above contains the possible tornado tracks for the two events. The red lines are estimated F4 tornadoes.

 

1942: West Palm Beach, FL was soaked by 8.35 inches of rain in just two hours.

 

2002: The heat wave continued across the east as high pressure off the Carolina blocked a frontal boundary across the Plains. Records for the date included:

Newark, New Jersey: 97

NYC Central Park: 96

Hartford, Connecticut: 95

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: 95

Reagan National Airport, DC: 95 (Tied monthly high)

Lynchburg, Virginia: 94

Atlantic City, New Jersey: 94

Norfolk, Virginia: 93

Providence, Rhode Island: 93

Boston, Massachusetts: 93

Portland, Maine: 80

 

Click HERE for more This Day in Weather History from the Southeast Regional Climate Center.