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Weather History Archive

On This Day In

                   Weather History

June 1st

Local and Regional Events:

June 1, 1990:

A small F0 tornado blew over two mobile homes on the north side of Groton. Numerous trees were either blown down or lost limbs.  Also, high winds of 65 mph occurred 5 miles south and 1 mile east of Mellette.

 

June 1, 2008:

Severe thunderstorms developed along the eastern slopes of the Black Hills and dropped large hail and heavy rain over eastern Custer and Shannon Counties. Softball sized hail was reported south of Hermosa.

 

June 1, 2011:

High water levels coming into June along with above normal June rainfall kept water levels up on Blue Dog, Bitter, Rush, and Waubay Lakes in Day County throughout the month. The high lake levels continued to cause extensive road and property damage. Many families remained away from their homes and cabins. Also, hundreds of acres of farmland remained flooded along with many roads. Road and property damage would be in the several millions of dollars. The high lake levels and flooding would continue for the next several months.  In Hamlin County, Lake Poinsett, including several other lakes, continued to flood and damage several homes along with several county and township roads.  High lake levels and flooding would continue for the next several months.

 

Local Climate Information:

Click HERE for daily climate information for Aberdeen, Mobridge, Pierre, Sisseton, and Watertown.

Click HERE for daily climate information for Sioux Falls, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux City.

 

U.S.A and Global Events for June 1st:

1903: During the early afternoon, one of the most destructive tornadoes in the history of Georgia up to this time, struck the outskirts of Gainesville. The track of the storm was about four miles in length and varied between 100 to 200 feet in width. The tornado touched down about one mile southwest of Gainesville, striking a large cotton mill at 12:45 pm, Eastern Time, just 10 minutes after 750 employees filed into the great structure from dinner. On the top floor of the mill were employed 250 children, and it was here that the greatest loss of life occurred. Click HERE for more information from the Monthly Weather Review.

The dotted lines in the image above contain an estimated tornado track. The image is courtesy of the Monthly Weather Review.

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Above is the cotton mill where most of the deaths occurred. This estimated F4 tornado killed 98 people and injured at least 200 others. Click HERE for more information from GenDisasters.com

 

1919: Snowfall of almost a half-inch fell at Denver, Colorado. This storm produced their greatest 24-hour snowfall recorded in the month of June. Two temperature records were set: The low temperature of 32 degrees was a record low for the date, and the high of only 40 degrees was a record low maximum. Cheyenne, Wyoming recorded 1.6 inches of snow, which is one of only six times that at least one inch of snow has fallen at Cheyenne in June.

 

1934: June started off on a warm note as high temperatures surpassed the century mark across parts of the Midwest. Several locations tied or set a record high temperatures for June including: Rockford, IL: 106°, Mather, WI: 105°, Hatfield, WI: 103°, Mondovi, WI: 102°, Chicago, IL: 102° and Grand Rapids, MI tied their June record high with 102°.

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1999: A tornado with an intermittent damage path destroyed 200 homes, businesses, and other buildings in the southern portion of St. James, Missouri. Of these, 33 homes were destroyed along with the St. James Golf Course clubhouse and two Missouri Department of Transportation buildings. The tornado then moved east, south of the downtown St. James area and intensified. F2 to F3 damage occurred with a 200 to 300-yard damage path. Several homes and farm buildings were severely damaged or destroyed. Further north, severe thunderstorms produced many tornadoes around central Illinois. The most intense tornado touched down in Montgomery County south of Farmersville and moved into southwest Christian County. One person was killed, when a semi-trailer overturned at a rest area on I-55. Across eastern parts of the state, high winds up to 70 mph caused damage to trees, power lines, and some buildings. The Mattoon area also reported flooding from these storms, producing $3 million dollars damage. 

 

Click HERE for more This Day in Weather History from the Southeast Regional Climate Center.