National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Enhanced Risk for Severe Thunderstorms Across the Upper Midwest; Flash Flooding Possible from the Upper Midwest to Southern Plains and Desert Southwest Through Friday

Portions of the Upper Midwest will see an increased threat for severe thunderstorms through this evening, with a few strong tornadoes possible. The same region remains on alert for additional flash flood concerns. Heavy rainfall may lead to flash flooding across the Desert Southwest today, and Southern Plains by Friday. Finally, Major-to-record river flooding continues across the Carolinas. Read More >

Weather History Archive

Weather History - June 13th

Local and Regional Events:

June 13, 1943:

An estimated F2 tornado moved ENE, destroying a home on the southeastern edge of Highmore in Hyde Country. A mother and her five children seeking shelter in the home were injured. Barns and outbuildings were damaged on a dozen farms. This tornado was estimated to be on the ground for about 8 miles and caused about $10,000 in damage.

 

June 13, 1991:

A small F1 tornado remained on the ground for 4 miles as it moved westerly from 10 miles west of Roscoe to 6 miles west of Roscoe, in Edmunds County. The path of the tornado continued for another 5 miles but was not consistently on the ground. It dissipated one mile west of Roscoe. Although the tornado had a long path, its width was 10 yards and traveled through open fields and cause little to no damage.

 

U.S.A and Global Events for June 13th:

1972: Severe weather conditions over the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico begin to converge and form a tropical depression that would become Hurricane Agnes over the next two weeks. This hurricane affected most of the eastern United States with the Northeast being the hardest hit area with heavy rainfall.  Click HERE for more information from the History Channel.

 

1976: A deadly tornado moved across parts of the southwestern Chicago, Illinois suburbs killing three people and injured 23 others. The tornado, with winds over 200 mph moved from Lemont to Downers Grove causing $13 million in damage when 87 homes were destroyed, and another 90 were damaged. The tornado passed over the Argonne National Laboratory, peeling part of a roof of the building housing a nuclear reactor. The tornadoes movement was somewhat erratic moving southeast to the north and finally turning northwest. Click HERE for more information from the Lemont Historical Society and Museum.

Click HERE for more This Day in Weather History from the Southeast Regional Climate Center.