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On This Day In

                   Weather History

June 16th

Local and Regional Events:

June 16, 1915:

A tornado swept over a narrow path in Hughes, Hyde, and Hand counties during the afternoon hours. This tornado caused several thousands of dollars in property damage and seriously injured many people. Luckily there were no fatalities reported.

 

June 16, 1992:

An F3 tornado caused major destruction as it moved northeast across the northwestern side of Ft. Thompson. The tornado virtually destroyed the Lake Sharpe Visitor Center. In Ft. Thompson, the tornado destroyed at least four homes and 15 mobile homes were damaged, leaving about 55 persons homeless. Eight people were injured, two of them seriously. The storm also destroyed other buildings, six 50,000 bushel grain bins, and four high voltage towers from Big Bend Dam. At the Shady Bend Campground, 19 campers and several boats were destroyed.

Also, heavy rains fell over a three-day period beginning on the 15th. The hardest hit area was in Clear Lake where the three-day total was 11.53 inches. As a result, a wall of water up to 15 feet high swept down creeks in the Clear Lake area. The resultant flash flooding went through first floors of many houses and even filled basements of houses on hills. The wave of water hit a car that was occupied by a woman and her son. The water spun them around as they floated about 200 yards. The car finally grounded without any reported injuries. All roads into Clear Lake were cut off as the town became surrounded by water. Officials in Deuel County estimated at least 37 bridges and culverts were destroyed. Other three-day rainfall totals include; 6.35 inches in Conde; 5.99 in Castlewood; 4.91 inches 2NW of Big Stone City; 4.90 in Redfield; and 4.65 inches at Artichoke Lake.

 

June 16, 2009:

A strong upper low-pressure area brought several supercell thunderstorms which produced severe weather across parts of central and northeast South Dakota. Large hail up to 2 inches in diameter, several tornadoes, along with flash flooding occurred with these storms. Slow moving thunderstorms brought very heavy rains of 2 to 4 inches in and around Aberdeen causing extensive road flooding throughout the city. Dozens of basements were flooded and damaged along with some sewer backups. Many vehicles became stalled with the police sent out to direct traffic. There were also some power outages. A tornado touched down briefly northwest of Lebanon in Potter County with no damage occurring. A tornado touched down southeast of Polo in Hand County, in an open field. No damage occurred. Heavy rains of 3 to over 5 inches caused flash flooding of several roads and crops in north-central and northeast Spink County. Torrential rains from 3 to 6 inches fell across southeast Brown County bringing flash flooding. Many roads were flooded and damaged along with many acres of cropland. A tornado touched down in southeast Hand County and remained on the ground for nearly 15 minutes before lifting. No damage occurred with this tornado as it stayed in the open country.

 

June 16, 2010:

Very strong winds were observed during the evening hours in Dewey County, South Dakota. Three weather stations near Lantry observed winds from 101 to 142 mph. One station had recorded a 101 mph wind before it was destroyed. The other two stations recorded 131 mph and 142 mph winds. The winds destroyed an airplane hangar and severely damaged another one. Several semi-trailers were also tipped over and damaged by the very high winds.

 

U.S.A and Global Events for June 16th:

1806: Great American total solar eclipse occurred from California to Massachusetts with nearly five-minute in duration. Click HERE for more information.

Report of the eclipse in the Hampshire Federalist, July 8, 1806. Collection of Michael Zeiler

 

1896: A tsunami ravages the coast of Japan killing between 22,000 and 27,000 people. Click HERE for more information from the History Channel.

 

Click HERE for more This Day in Weather History from the Southeast Regional Climate Center.