National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

On This Day In

                   Weather History

November 14th

Local and Regional Events:

November 14, 1997:

A strong low-pressure system produced snow and blowing snow, creating near whiteout conditions at times. Six inches of snow fell in the Sisseton foothills by Friday evening in Roberts and eastern Marshall Counties. Strong north winds gusting to near 35 mph, combined with the snow, caused visibilities to fall below one-half mile at times over a large portion of northeast South Dakota during the evening of the 13th and through the 14th. Classes were canceled around Summit because of near-whiteout conditions, while classes were delayed for two hours in Britton. Interstate 29 was closed just north of the Grant County line for a time after a semi-trailer rolled. Some snowfall amounts include; 6.5 inches in Summit; 6.2 inches in Waubay; 6.0 inches in Roscoe; and 5.0 inches in Sisseton and Wilmot.

U.S.A and Global Events for November 14th:

1921: During the afternoon hours, thunderstorms brought severe hail to portions of Alabama. The hail stones ranged from about the size of buckshot to as large as a baseball. The largest weighing as much as a pound.

 

1969: Apollo 12 was launched into a threatening gray sky with ominous cumulus clouds. Pete Conrad's words 43 seconds after liftoff, electrified everyone in the Control Center: "We had a whole bunch of buses drops out," followed by "Where are we going?" and "I just lost the platform." Lightning had stricken the spacecraft. Warning lights were illuminated, and the spacecraft guidance system lost its attitude reference.

A photo of a lightning bolt striking Apollo 12 and crane

The lightning bolt that struck Apollo 12 aloft also hit the crane and platform of the mobile launcher. Image courtesy of NASA.

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