National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Storm in South and Central U.S. to Move into the East on Saturday

A weather system extending from the Central Rockies and Plains to the southern U.S. will shift into the eastern states on Saturday. Rain, locally heavy, may produce flash flooding in the Deep and Mid South today, and the Southern Appalachians on Saturday. On the north side of this storm, a wintry mix can be expected; and isolated severe storms may develop in the Lower Mississippi Valley. Read More >

Overview

An intense area of low pressure approached the region through the day on Monday, October 21st, producing increasingly strong east to northeast winds. The winds increased through the day, and were especially strong coming off Lake Superior into the Twin Ports area. Peak wind speeds topped 70 MPH at some of the bridges and waves caused damage along many of the lake shore areas. In addition, the strong winds knocked down trees and power lines down leading to power outages.

The Duluth Water Level Observation Station located in the Duluth harbor operated by NOAA/National Ocean Service, may have broken an all-time record at 604.75' topping the previous record of 604.42' recorded in 1985.  Other unique impacts included:

  • Access to the Park Point neighborhood in Duluth was limited to all but emergency vehicles for a period of time that evening. A Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) was used by local officials.
  • Winds gusted to 61 mph at the Duluth International Airport (KDLH) with a peak gust of 74 mph recorded on the Blatnik Bridge in the Twin Ports.

Fairly widespread rains of 1 to over 3 inches of rain fell leading to some ponding, localized flooding, and rises on area rivers.

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Radar loop from October 21st
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