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Summary
 

A cluster of strong thunderstorms with intense rainfall moved across the Sedona area between 1:45 – 3:00 PM MST. Most of Sedona received between 0.5 to 3 inches of rain in less than one hour. The runoff from the intense rain resulted in flash flooding at several locations, with the worst reported flooding at Tlaquepaque and West Sedona.

 
Timeline
Radar Loop September 10th, 2009 From 1:29pm To 2:59pm

Radar Loop September 10th, 2009 From 1:29pm To 2:59pm

Infrared Satellite Loop September 10th, 2009 From 11:00am To 3:00pm

Infrared Satellite Loop September 10th, 2009 From 11:00am To 3:00pm

Radar Estimated Rainfall at 6:06 PM on September 10, 2009.

Radar Estimated Rainfall at 6:06 PM on September 10, 2009.

Water rushed off the Mogollon Rim and areas of other high terrain before converging in Sedona at Tlaquepaque Village. The water primarily flowed from northwest to southeast.

Water rushed off the Mogollon Rim and areas of other high terrain before converging in Sedona at Tlaquepaque Village. The water primarily flowed from northwest to southeast.

  • 1:30 PM: Strongest thunderstorm of the day formed northwest of Sedona, tracking southeast across much of Sedona during the next one and a half hours.

  • 2:00 PM: Rain began to fall across north and west portions of Sedona.

  • 2:05-2:45 PM: A period of intense rain fell across west Sedona.

  • 2:20 PM: First report of flooding in west Sedona.

  • 2:30 PM: First report of flooding at Tlaquepaque Village in Sedona. Widespread street flooding reported in Sedona with streambeds overflowing their banks pushing large boulders onto streets.

  • 4:15 PM: Flash flood threat ended.

Impacts
  • There were numerous reports of widespread street flooding, streambeds overflowing banks, and flooding of homes in the west Sedona area.
  • A short time later, Soldier Pass Wash began overflowing its banks at the Tlaquepaque Village, inundating the village with 2 feet of water and floating and overturning numerous cars which were parked in the village’s parking lot.
  • Several cars were swept into Soldier Pass Wash and carried 100 to 200 yards downstream.
  • As the flood waters receded, a thick layer of mud and flood-damaged cars remained over much of the village area.
Pictures

 

Mud, debris, and cars by Oak Creek Brewers (building on the left)

Mud, debris, and cars by Oak Creek Brewers (building on the left)

Mud in parking lot at Los Abrigados

Mud in parking lot at Los Abrigados

Car removed from Soldier Pass Wash near Los Abrigados

Car removed from Soldier Pass Wash near Los Abrigados

Significant flood waters seen flowing in the Tlaquepaque area

Significant flood waters seen flowing in the Tlaquepaque area

Meteorology

 

The combination of abundant moisture, an unstable air mass, and a compact upper level low moving south across the region set the stage for scattered showers and thunderstorms over northern Arizona during the afternoon of September 10, 2009. A few of these thunderstorms produced intense rain and small hail.

Points of Contact

For more information on impacts and general inquiries about this event, please reference the contacts below:

  • National Weather Service: Brian Klimowski, Meteorologist-in-Charge at (928) 556-9161 ext. 222 or brian.klimowski@noaa.gov
    Tony Merriman, Warning Coordination Meteorologist at (928) 556-9161 ext. 223 or tony.merriman@noaa.gov

  • Coconino County Emergency Management at (928) 679-8310