National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

It will be mostly clear and cool tonight with lows in the upper 30s to mid 40s. The gusty northwest winds that we had today will decrease to 5 to 10 mph after sunset and then become light and variable overnight.
It will be mostly sunny and warmer Wednesday with highs in the 70s. Southeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
There will be warming trend Thursday through Saturday. It will be breezy Thursday and Friday with south winds 15 to 25 mph. Low chances of rain will return north of a Comanche to Bonham line Highs will be in the 70s to lower 80s Thursday, upper 70s northeast to upper 80s northwest Friday and around 80 east to around 90 northwest Saturday.
It will be mostly cloudy Sunday and Sunday night with a chance of showers and thunderstorms. A few storms could be strong to severe late afternoon into the evening. Highs will range from the upper 70s northeast to near 90 degrees northwest. Lows Sunday night will be in upper 50s northeast to the upper 60s southeast.
A slow-moving upper trough over the Rockies and Four Corners area will provide multiple storm chances back to the area at least the first half of the week. A surface dryline and eventual cold will also play a role for the development of showers and thunderstorms. However, with this system a week away, many details regarding storm track, timing, and thunderstorm development/severe weather potential remain HIGHLY UNCERTAIN. Continue to monitor future forecasts regarding next week.
We will have a SKYWARN Basic Class on Thursday, March 22nd in Gun Barrel City (Henderson County). The class will be from 7 pm to 9 pm. Classes are free and registration is not required! We hope to see you there!

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Supercell Thunderstorms Create Swath of Damage and Injury
April 5, 2003


West and North Texas county map that shows a swath of hail that moved across the region on the 5th of April, 2003. The map also shows 4 tornadoes.April 5th, 2003 may go down in history as one of the costliest hail storm events ever in the United States! 

A lone supercell thunderstorm developed around 3 pm southeast of Claremont, in Kent County. The storm quickly became severe, producing nickel sized hail. A few minutes later, south of Aspermont (Stonewall County), the storm produced its first tornado.  Large hail was reported with this storm as well. 

The supercell storm continued to move east where it again produced a brief tornado in southern Throckmorton County. Very large hail continued with this storm as it continued to move east along a stalled surface boundary.

The next tornado occurred in northern Palo Pinto county at 6:20 pm. Four inch hail accompanied the storm at this time. Continuing to propagate along the surface boundary, the storm moved into the western metroplex where it packed baseball sized hail. At approximately 7:40 pm, a couple of tornadoes briefly touched down in North Richland Hills (Northeast Tarrant County). 

A picture taken of a 3 inch hailstone in Northeast Tarrant County.Three inch hail also pummeled northeast Tarrant County. New supercell storms formed behind the main storm that originated in west Texas, however, no more tornadoes were found from the series of supercells that moved over the metroplex. Large hail (larger than baseballs) did continue with the storms as they moved further east. Four and a half inch hail fell in far northern Rockwall County. The large hail swath ended around 10:50 pm, west of Sulphur Springs (Hopkins County), where 1.75 inch hail fell.  

At least 3 people were injured by the large hail that fell during this event, and numerous roofs, gutters, windows, airplanes, automobiles, and trees were damaged. The damage cost from these storms will likely continue to rise over the coming weeks and months. 


Photo of 3 inch hailstone that fell