National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

It'll be a warm and breezy overnight period with overnight lows in the mid to upper 50s. Some areas across East TX may fall into the mid 50s. Winds speeds of 15 to 25 MPH are expected.
Much warmer weather is in store Friday and Saturday ahead of a slow- moving cold front. Just about all of the region will see high temperatures in the 80s by Saturday. Gusty south winds on Friday will weaken on Saturday as the front approaches.
The threat for very heavy rainfall and flooding will increase across all of North Texas Monday through Wednesday of next week. A slow moving upper low will combine with a stalled frontal boundary and copious amounts of moisture to produce several days of rain and thunderstorms. Many areas will see 2-4" of rain with heavier amounts possible.
A dryline will move into the region Sunday afternoon and will likely help a few storms develop. Any storms that develop would have the potential to be severe with mainly a large hail threat. Most of this activity is expected to remain west of I-35.
It'll be warm and windy on Friday as south winds of 15 to 25 MPH overspread the area. Winds may gusts around 35 MPH, especially west of I-35. Afternoon high temperatures will climb into the 70s and 80s area-wide. Skies will start out mostly cloudy with partial clearing from west to east through the day.
We will have a SKYWARN Basic Class on Thursday, March 22nd in Gun Barrel City (Henderson County). The class will be from 7 pm to 9 pm. Classes are free and registration is not required! We hope to see you there!

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The Heat Index

We, at the National Weather Service, as part of our mission for protecting life and property, have a measure of how the hot weather "feels" to the body. The Heat Index is based on work by R.G. Steadman and published in 1979 under the title "The Assessment of Sultriness, Parts 1 and 2." In this work, Steadman constructed a table which uses relative humidity and dry bulb temperature to produce the "apparent temperature" or the temperature the body "feels".

We use this table to provide you with Heat Index values. These values are for shady locations only. Exposure to full sunshine can increase heat index values by up to 15°F. Also, strong winds, particularly with very hot, dry air, can be extremely hazardous as the wind adds heat to the body. The Heat Index Chart is below.

NWS Heat Index Chart

How to read the chart...Follow the temperature line until it intersects the relative humidity line. Then read the Heat Index on the curved line. For example, an air temperature of 100°F and Relative Humidity of 40%. Follow the 100°F temperature line until it intersects the 40% relative humidity line. Then curved line that also intersects is the Heat Index of 110°F, or Very Hot. That is the temperature the body thinks it is and attempts to compensate for that level of heat. Remember, these values are in the SHADE. You can add up to 15°F to these values if you are in direct sunlight.

The chart below tells you the risk to the body from continued exposure to the excessive heat.

Category Classification Heat Index/Apparent Temperature (°F) General Affect on People in High Risk Groups
I Extremely Hot 130°F or Higher Heat/Sunstroke HIGHLY LIKELY with continued exposure
II Very Hot 105°F - 130°F Sunstroke, heat cramps, or heat exhaustion LIKELY, and heatstroke POSSIBLE with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity
III Hot 90°F - 105°F Sunstroke, heat cramps, or heat exhaustion POSSIBLE with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity
IV Very Warm 80°F - 90°F Fatigue POSSIBLE with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity



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