National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

South winds will shift to the north this afternoon as a cold front pushes south through the region. The front will cross the Red River early this afternoon, then exit the southern-most counties early this evening. Skies should remain mostly cloudy across the southeastern-most counties, with partly cloudy skies elsewhere.
Cooler and breezy weather is in store tonight following a cold front which will push through the area this afternoon. Gusty winds mixed with temperatures in the 30s will produce wind chill values in the 25 to 30 degree range across the northwest and Red River counties.
A cold front will move through Central Texas early Wednesday morning, leaving brisk north winds 10 to 15 mph and mostly sunny conditions in it's wake. This will be the coolest day of the week, with many areas struggling into the 50s by afternoon for high temperatures. The wind will make it feel even cooler.
Outside of a few modest cold front Friday night/Saturday morning this Thanksgiving Weekend, look for near, or slightly above seasonal temperatures with no rainfall expected. Off and on breezy conditions will occur with highs in the 60s and 70s.

 
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North Texas Storm Data
prepared by the National Weather Service
in Fort Worth, TX

Preliminary Storm Data is posted between 60 and 90 days after the last day of the month.

This section of the Fort Worth National Weather Service Home Page contains unofficial information about storms that have occurred in North Texas. Material is organized by month, so readers should be  able to find the information wanted fairly quickly by simply knowing the approximate date of the event.

Storm Data is an official publication of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), part of the Department of Commerce. NOAA prepares, funds, and distributes these official documents which are available by subscription. Subscription, pricing, and ordering information is available from: NOAA Logo
National Climatic Data Center
151 Patton Avenue
Asheville, NC 28801-5001
828-271-4800

The material presented here is collected and compiled by National Weather Service meteorologists at Fort Worth. This involves a variety of methods to collect information on storm events within the state of Texas. These sources include but are not limited to newspaper clippings, eyewitness reports, radar data, storm surveys, and storm spotter reports from amateur radio operators, law enforcement agencies, and emergency management organizations. Because of this involved process, preliminary Storm Data is posted between 60 and 90 days after the last day of the month.


When viewing this data, you will note various estimates of path length and width for tornadoes, as well as dollar estimates for damage to property and crops due to tornadoes, wind and/or hail. Please remember that it is very difficult for us to assign a dollar amount for damages, and many of these estimates are "educated guesses". At times, when it is not possible to assess an amount, a question mark (?), zero (0), or even a blank is put into this column. A zero (0) or blank does not necessarily mean no damage occurred, but rather an estimated dollar damage could not be determined, and the software used to develop these reports would not allow a question mark (?) as an entry.

 

Storm Data, in it's published form, includes a special section called 'Outstanding Storms of the Month' prepared by the Data Operations Branch of the National Climatic Data Center. This special feature includes photographs of storms and/or storm damage on especially noteworthy storms. Storm Data also includes periodic summaries, weather tables, and statistics prepared by the National Hurricane Center and the Storm Prediction Center.

Storm Data is intended to document storms and their impacts as completely as possible within the constraints of time and resources. However, due to the difficulties associated with the collection of this type of information, it is not all-inclusive. Information provided here should be considered preliminary until it is published in the official publication from the National Climatic Data Center.