National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Severe Storms Possible in the South; Southwest Critical Fire Weather Threats

Severe storms with large to very large hail, damaging winds, a couple of tornadoes, and heavy rain that could cause flash flooding may develop across the eastern South Plains to the Deep South. Dry, gusty winds in the Southwest will keep fire weather threats critical. Elevated fire weather threats also in portions of the East. Cool and snowy in the Northern Tier states and West mountains. Read More >

Overview

A prolonged period of well below normal and at times record temperatures and light snowfall events culminated in a classic winter storm on Presidents Day that brought up to 10-12 inches of snow to the county warning area. An anomalously cold Arctic air mass had engulfed the region for a week prior to this event, keeping temperatures below freezing. A renewed shot of Arctic air surged into the area over the weekend, and temperatures struggled to make it out of the single digits Sunday and Monday, with lows dropping below zero. Deep atmospheric lift provided by coupled upper-level jet streaks, an approaching mid-level trough, and mid-level frontogenesis took advantage of modest Gulf moisture moving north into the mid-Mississippi Valley to produce snow, heavy at times, Monday the 15th of February. The highest snowfall amounts occurred in east-central and southeast Missouri and southern Illinois where stout lift and the highest moisture resided.

Browse through pictures of the storm, snowfall totals, and a detailed meteorological explanation of the storm on our new ArcGIS Story Map summarizing the event!

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