National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Record High Temperatures Likely Across the Mid-Atlantic; Severe Weather in the Upper Midwest and Southwest

An intense heat wave will peak across the Mid-Atlantic and I-95 Urban Corridor this weekend. Record high temperatures are likely with widespread heat indices exceeding 100 degrees. In the Midwest, severe storms capable of producing strong winds, hail, a few tornadoes and heavy rain will be possible Saturday. Additionally, strong storms will also be possible Saturday in the Four Corners region. Read More >

 

The material provided in this document is general information on how you can use NOAA Weather Radio (NWR) as an alerting tool for the deaf and hard of hearing. This is not an all-inclusive listing of how the system can be used, what products are available or an endorsement of any product listed here.

You can purchase at least one off-the-shelf NWR receiver system that provides an alert for the deaf and hard of hearing. In some cases, if you already have a home security system, you can connect the NWR receiver to your existing alerting system, much the same as a door bell, smoke detector or other sensor. If you have some electronics skills, you may be able to purchase an NWR receiver and other components and assemble them into a system designed to meet your special needs.

In simple systems, alarm devices are directly connected to the output of the NWR receiver. In more complex installations, using wireless and wired remote modules, connections are made through devices that allow more remote and versatile placement of alarms. Alarms may require external power from batteries or modular power supplies. Make sure the alarm will work during a power failure. See the block diagram below for system layouts.

The National Weather Service (NWS) does not guarantee the proper operation of any of the equipment or systems listed here and is not liable for any damages as a result of non-receipt of alarms, alerts or warnings from these systems. Inclusion of a product in this document does not imply endorsement by the NWS. Some general questions and answers regarding use of NWR by the deaf and hard of hearing follow.
 

QUESTION:  What good is a radio to people who are deaf or hard of hearing?
 
QUESTION:  How does it work?
 
QUESTION:  What do I do when I have received a Warning from NWR SAME?
 
QUESTION:  Where can I get additional information about the event that caused the Warning to be issued?
 
QUESTION:  Where can I get the necessary equipment and what does it cost?
 
QUESTION:  How can I find out if my home or office is covered by NWR?
 
QUESTION:  Where can I buy an NWR receiver and accessories for the deaf and hard of hearing?
 

The National Weather Service does not guarantee the proper operation of any of the equipment or systems listed herein and is not liable for any damages as a result of non-receipt of alarms, alerts, or warnings from these systems. Inclusion of a product in this document does not imply endorsement by the NWS