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Excessive Heat in Southern California; Tropical Storm Ian Expected to Rapidly Intensify

Excessive heat is possible through Wednesday over southern California. Strong thunderstorms may pose some risk for severe weather across parts of the upper Ohio Valley into the northern Mid Atlantic coast. Tropical Storm Ian is forecast to approach the Florida peninsula at major hurricane strength by midweek, and poses a risk of dangerous storm surge, hurricane-force winds, and heavy rainfall. Read More >

U.S. Drought Monitor | Click here for a listing of ways to obtain past precipitation

Contiguous U.S. Drought Monitor
High Plains Drought Monitor
WFO Rapid City, SD U.S. Drought Monitor

The categories of drought are defined as follows:

Abnormally Dry (D0)
Going into drought: short-term dryness slowing planting, growth of crops or pastures; fire risk above average. Coming out of drought: some lingering water deficits; pastures or crops not fully recovered.

Moderate Drought (D1)
Some damage to crops, pastures; fire risk high; streams, reservoirs, or wells low, some water shortages developing or imminent, voluntary water use restrictions requested.

Severe Drought (D2)
Crop or pasture losses likely; fire risk very high; water shortages common; water restrictions imposed.

Extreme Drought (D3)
Major crop/pasture losses; extreme fire danger; widespread water shortages or restrictions.

Exceptional Drought (D4)
Exceptional and widespread crop/pasture losses; exceptional fire risk; shortages of water in reservoirs, streams, and wells, creating water emergencies.

000
AXUS73 KUNR 132119
DGTUNR

DROUGHT INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE RAPID CITY SD
315 PM MDT Sat Aug 13 2022  

...DROUGHT CONDITIONS ACROSS THE AREA...

.SYNOPSIS:

.Drought Intensity and Extent: According to the August 9 release of
the U.S. Drought Monitor, Extreme (D3) drought covered southeast
Ziebach and a portion of northern Haakon Counties. Severe (D2)
Drought covered the rest of southeastern Ziebach and northern Haakon
Counties. Moderate (D1) Drought covered the rest of Ziebach and
Haakon Counties as well as northern Jackson, most of Pennington,
southern and eastern Meade, southern Lawrence, Custer, Fall River,
Oglala Lakota, Bennett, southern Todd, and southern Tripp counties
in South Dakota. In northeast Wyoming, Moderate (D1) drought covered
southern and western portion of Campbell and southern Weston
counties. Abnormally Dry (D0) conditions covered the rest of the
area with the exception of Harding and the northern two-thirds of
Perkins counties where no drought conditions exist.

.Precipitation: Precipitation so far this summer has been very
spotty. In July, amounts ranged from under an inch in Edgemont and
Opal to over 5 inches at Wind Cave. Temperatures were above average
everywhere.

.Hydrologic Condition: Most rivers and streams are in the normal
range for streamflow for this time of the year. Soil moisture ranges
from dry to near normal.

.SUMMARY OF IMPACTS:

.Agricultural Impacts: For the week ending August 7, topsoil
moisture supplies in South Dakota rated 23% very short, 25% short,
48% adequate, and 4% surplus according to the USDA`s National
Agricultural Statistics Service. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 19%
very short, 28% short, 50% adequate, and 3% surplus. Pasture and
range conditions rated 17% very poor, 24% poor, 32% fair, 24% good,
and 3% excellent.

In Wyoming, for the week ending August 7, topsoil moisture was 33%
very short, 39% short, and 28% adequate. Subsoil moisture supplies
rated 35% very short, 40% short, and 25% adequate. Pasture and range
conditions were 14% very poor, 17% poor, 32% fair, and 37% good.

.Hydrologic Impacts: Some stock ponds and dugouts remain dry or
contain water of poor quality in the drought areas.

.DROUGHT MITIGATION ACTIONS: Rapid City`s annual mandatory water
conservation measure continues through August 31, while Gillette`s
water waste ordinance continues through October 1.

.LOCAL DROUGHT OUTLOOK: The rest of August looks to be drier and
warmer than average. The outlook for the autumn calls for a greater
chance of above average temperatures and below average
precipitation. Drought conditions are expected to persist or worsen.

.NEXT ISSUANCE DATE: This product is expected to be updated in
September or as conditions change.

&&

.RELATED WEB SITES:

Additional information on current drought conditions may be found at
the following web addresses:

U.S. Drought Monitor: https://www.droughtmonitor.unl.edu/
U.S. Drought Portal: https://drought.gov/
WY Drought Information and Resources: https://drought.wyo.gov
Climate Prediction Center (CPC): https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/
High Plains Regional Climate Center: https://hprcc.unl.edu/
South Dakota Climate and Water: https://climate.sdstate.edu/
Wyoming Water Resources Data System & State Climate Office:
http://www.wrds.uwyo.edu/

Additional water and river information:

NWS: https://water.weather.gov/
OWP: https://water.noaa.gov/
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): https://water.usgs.gov/
Bureau of Reclamation Great Plains Region: https://www.usbr.gov/gp/

.ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:

The U.S. Drought Monitor is a multi-agency effort involving NOAA`s
National Weather Service and National Centers for Environmental
Information, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), state and
regional climatologists, and the National Drought Mitigation Center.
Information for this statement was gathered from NWS and Federal
Aviation Administration (FAA) observation sites, state cooperative
extension services, USACE and USGS.

.CONTACT INFORMATION:

Should you have any questions or comments about this drought
statement, please contact:

Melissa Smith
Service Hydrologist
melissa.smith@noaa.gov

or

Matthew Bunkers
Science and Operations Officer
matthew.bunkers@noaa.gov

National Weather Service
300 East Signal Drive
Rapid City, South Dakota 57701
605-341-9271

$$

Calculated Soil Moisture Anomaly
Calculated Soil Moisture Anomaly
Evaporative Demand Drought Index (EDDI)
Evaporative Demand Drought Index (EDDI)
GOES-16 Greenness 8-Day Max (NVDI based)
GOES-16 Greenness 8-Day Max (NVDI based)
GOES-16 Greenness 5-Day Change (NDVI based)
GOES-16 Greenness 5-Day Change (NDVI based)

Past Precipitation

24 Hour Estimated Precipitation
24 Hour Estimated Precipitation 
3 Day Estimated Precipitation
3 Day Estimated Precipitation
5 Day Estimated Precipitation
5 Day Estimated Precipitation
30 Day Bias-Corrected Estimated Precipitation
30 Day Bias-Corrected Estimated Precipitation

 

Precipitation Forecast

1 Day Precipitation Forecast
1 Day Precipitation Forecast 
2 Day Precipitation Forecast
2 Day Precipitation Forecast 
3 Day Precipitation Forecast
3 Day Precipitation Forecast
5 Day Precipitation Forecast
5 Day Precipitation Forecast
7 Day Precipitation Forecast
7 Day Precipitation Forecast

 

Precipitation Outlook

6-10 Day Precipitation Outlook
6-10 Day Precipitation Outlook
8-14 Day Precipitation Outlook
8-14 Day Precipitation Outlook
One Precipitation Outlook
One Month Precipitation Outlook
Three Month Precipitation Outlook
Three Month Precipitation Outlook

Departure From Normal

7 Day Departure from Normal Temperature
7 Day Departure from Normal Temperature
14 Day Departure From Normal Temperature
14 Day Departure From Normal Temperature
30 Day Departure From Normal Temperature
30 Day Departure From Normal Temperature
60 Day Departure From Normal Temperature
60 Day Departure From Normal Temperature
Mean Temperature
Mean Temperature

 

Temperature Outlook

6-10 Day Temperature Outlook
6-10 Day Temperature Outlook

8-14 Day Temperature Outlook
8-14 Day Temperature Outlook

One Month Temperature Outlook
One Month Temperature Outlook

Three Month Temperature Outlook
Three Month Temperature Outlook

The drought monitor is a multi-agency effort involving NOAA’s National Weather Service (NWS) and the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), State and Regional Climate Centers, and the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Information for this statement has been gathered from a number of different federal, state, and local agencies including the NWS and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Observing Sites, State Cooperative Extension Services, United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and many more.

If you have any questions or comments about this drought information please contact:

Melissa Smith
Service Hydrologist
melissa.smith@noaa.gov

or

Matthew Bunkers
Science and Operations Office
matthew.bunkers@noaa.gov

National Weather Service
300 East Signal Drive
Rapid City South Dakota 57701
605-341-9271 ext. 493

Related Drought Links