National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Light winds, moist and cool soils, will allow some fog to develop late tonight. Lows will be in mostly the 40s. If you do encounter any fog during the pre-dawn hours, remember to slow down, use low beams or fog lights, and allow extra time to reach your destination.
It will be cloudy Sunday with a chance of showers. Highs will be in the upper 50s northeast to the mid 70s west. Winds will be southerly at 10 to 20 mph.
There will be chances of showers and thunderstorms on Monday. There will also be a risk for a strong storm or two if a strong cap in place can break, especially north of Interstate 20 late in the day where temperatures warm into the 60s. It will be mainly cloudy and windy with south winds 15 to 25 mph and gusty. Better rain and storm chances will occur late Monday night through Wednesday.
An unsettled weather pattern will remain over the region Tuesday and Wednesday with numerous showers and some thunderstorms expected. Although a few strong to severe storms will be possible on Tuesday, moderate to heavy rainfall and some flooding will be the more likely threat, especially Wednesday.
Join us Tuesday, February 20th, for our SKYWARN class in Cooper, Texas (Delta County) at the Delta County Civic Center. We will be hosting the basic session from 6 PM to 8PM. All SKYWARN classes are free and open to all ages. No registration is required!
Join us Tuesday, February 20th, for our SKYWARN class in Glen Rose, Texas (Somervell County) at the Somervell County Fire Department. We will be hosting the basic session from 630 PM to 830PM. All SKYWARN classes are free and open to all ages. No registration is required!

 
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Snow covered barn in Wise County.

Heavy Snow Event 

March 6, 2008

   

 

On 6 March 2008, a convective precipitation band formed across North Texas and quickly transitioned from rain to snow in a 60 km wide zone extending from west of the Dallas / Fort Worth metroplex northeast into extreme North Texas near the Red River. The snow persisted for over three hours with accumulations averaging 7 cm and isolated reports up to 30 cm near the heaviest convective precipitation. Frontogenesis and the resulting ageostrophic circulation appeared to play key roles in not only providing significant forcing for ascent but also in modifying the vertical temperature profile to be supportive of a liquid-to-frozen precipitation transition.  The presence of atmospheric instability led to isolated thunderstorm development, with occasional cloud-to-ground and in-cloud lightning observed in the band of heavy snow. This study reviews the complex interactions between moisture, instability, and forcing for ascent that occurred during this convective winter weather event.

Download Paper Here 

 

NWS Ft. Worth Research Webpage

Satellite Image Taken the Morning After the Heavy Snow