National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Excessive Heat Continues for the Pacific Northwest; Flooding Impacts Expected in the Southwest U.S.

A dangerous heat wave persists for the Northwest into portions of California today with excessive heat warnings and heat advisories in effect. The active monsoon pattern with organized showers and thunderstorms and possible flash flooding with debris flows continues and will become enhanced in the Southwestern U.S. through Saturday. Read More >

A record heat wave baked the Midwest in early July 1936.  The temperature reached 100°F and above for a record eleven consecutive days from July 5 to July 11.  People had to cope with the extreme heat without the benefit of air-conditioning.  The all-time high and high minimum temperatures for the quad cities were recorded on July 14th when the mercury reached a sizzling 111°F and only dropped to a low of 84°F.  It was the warmest summer on record with an average temperature of 78.8 degrees.  July was also the warmest month with an average temperature of 85 degrees. 

 

Table 1: Daily record high temperature (°F)  from July 4 to July 17, 1936

Date

Burlington, IA

Cedar Rapids, IA

Dubuque, IA

Moline, IL

 4

 108

 -

 -

 5

 108

 -

 -

 105

 6

 105

 102

 102

 105

 7

 105

 100

 102

 105

 8

 105

 -

 101

 104

 9

 104

 -

 -

 102

 10

 106

 -

 103

 105

 11

 107

 -

 107

 107

 12

 109

 106

 106

 108

 13

 108

 108

 107

 107

 14

 111

 109

 110

 111

 15

 111

 105

 101

 106

 16

 100

 -

 -

 -

 17

 105

102 

 100

103 

 

Table 2: Record warm low temperatures (°F)  July 7 to July 15, 1936

Date

Dubuque, IA

Moline, IL

7

-

81

8

-

80

9

78

82

10

80

80

11

-

81

12

76

81

13

77

82

14

79

84

15

-

83