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Active Western Storms; Quiet in the East

A cold weather system will produce heavy mountain snow and gusty winds across the Intermountain West and central Rockies. Windy conditions associated with this storm will produce critical fire weather threats for parts of the central High Plains and elevated threats into the south Plains. An approaching storm may produce showers with areas of heavy mountain snow on the West Coast. Read More >

The SKYWARN Program

 

Click me to fill out a Storm Report

 

Who Are SKYWARN Severe Weather Spotters?

SKYWARN spotters in North Dakota consist of emergency response officials, amateur radio operators and trained residents. This is a volunteer public service. Each year spotters donate their time and resources to assist the NWS in fulfilling its mission to protect lives and property.

 

National Weather Service Skywarn National Page

 

NWS Bismarck Skywarn Training Schedule

 

 

FREE Online SKYWARN Training

To become a trained spotter you must register here before taking these two courses.

If you have any questions, and once you complete the courses, email nathan.heinert@noaa.gov with your location and contact information. 

These two courses cover the basics of being a SKYWARN spotter. You will need to create a user account (FREE) on the MetEd website before viewing the courses.

Click a link below. Some files are large and may take a minute to load.

Reference material for knowledge and safety

Spotter Booklet

Spotter Reference Guide 1

Spotter Reference Guide 2

Hail Size Chart

FEMA - Building A Safe Room 

Scijinks - it's all about weather for kids of all ages

Jetstream - an online school for weather 


 Amateur Radio Networks

Amateur Radio SKYWARN Frequencies (in West and Central North Dakota)

  • Beach - 146.730 MHz
  • Bismarck - 146.850 MHz or 146.940 MHz
  • Bowman - 145.310 MHz
  • Carrington - 146.670 MHz
  • Dickinson - 146.820 MHz 
  • Hannover - 145.430 MHz
  • Jamestown - 147.180 MHz
  • Killdeer - 146.640 MHz
  • Minot - 146.970 MHz or 147.270 MHz
  • New Salem - 146.520 MHz
  • Stanley - 146.790 MHz
  • Williston - 147.210 MHz

Most of these sites can be linked together and in times of severe weather allows amateur radio operators at the NWS to communicate with those directly affected by the storm. The callsign for the NWS in Bismarck is W0BIS. Amateur radio operators are a vital part of the NWS severe weather warning program.

Amateur Radio Links

More Information on SKYWARN Training

Emergency response officials, amateur radio operators and the general public are all encouraged to attend. The 90 minute training occurs each spring in many of the counties in North Dakota. It is free of charge and is sponsored by your local County or Tribal Emergency Manager. Requests for training should be made through them.

SKYWARN severe weather spotter training seminars consist of a discussion of storm hazards (flash floods, lightning, tornadoes, hail and high wind) and advice on how to be safe from severe weather. Our goal is to make you more Weather-Ready!

The NWS issues severe weather warnings when there is a threat to life or property. When a warning is issued for your location you are in danger and need to seek shelter.

For information on SKYWARN sessions contact your local Emergency Manager or email john.paul.martin@noaa.gov at NWS Bismarck.