National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Heavy Rainfall Threat The Next Few Days Across The Eastern U.S.

A strong cold front will gradually push through the Eastern U.S. over the next few days and will likely produce heavy rain and severe weather. The rainfall may become excessive and result in flash flooding. Flash flood watches are currently in effect from the coastal Carolinas to the Great Lakes. Read More >

For the first time in over 15 years, upgrades are in progress for the system which produces the broadcast programs for NOAA Weather Radio. A new computer system is being used to generate audio recordings of the forecasts, observations, watches and warnings which are routinely heard over the air. The actual broadcast programming remains unchanged, but listeners may notice that messages are being read in a new voice.

The National Weather Service office in Greenville-Spartanburg is part of a small group of offices across the country participating in an operational test and evaluation of the new voice system. As part of this test, the transition to the new voice occurred on January 11.  Meteorologists at the Greenville-Spartanburg office are closely monitoring the quality of the new voice during the evaluation period, which will last at least through the end of January, but possibly longer.  If significant problems are discovered, the office will switch back to the original system until the problems can be fixed.  Otherwise, the new system is expected to roll out nationwide later this year.

Once again, no change is being made to the kinds of programming heard on NOAA Weather Radio transmitters. Watches and warnings will continue to cause receivers to alert as before.  If you have comments regarding the quality of the voice, feel free to share them with NWS GSP by emailing gsp.webmaster@noaa.gov.  Thanks!

Click here for the locations and frequencies of the NOAA Weather Radio transmitters in the western Carolinas and northeast Georgia.