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Hurricane Preparedness Week For South Carolina

 May 31st - June 6th, 2020 

 

Hurricane Florence Makes Landfall In 2018

Florence Landfall


 

This week is South Carolina’s annual Hurricane Preparedness Week.  This week the National Weather Service and the South Carolina Emergency Management Division are teaming up to bring this hurricane safety campaign to all of South Carolina’s residents.  With warmer weather quickly approaching, now is the time to prepare for hurricane season.  If each South Carolina resident would take a few moments this week to learn about hurricane safety and implement a hurricane safety plan, then we would all be better off when hurricanes threaten our area.  Remember you should prepare EACH and EVERY YEAR, as it only takes ONE Storm!

Please join us in promoting hurricane preparedness during this year's "Hurricane Preparedness Week". The National Weather Service asks emergency management, public safety officials, local media and Weather-Ready Nation Ambassadors to help join forces in improving the nation's readiness, responsiveness, and overall resilience against hurricanes during the upcoming season. 

Visit https://www.weather.gov/wrn/hurricane-preparedness for additional National Weather Service Hurricane Preparedness information and material.

 

 

Hurricane Preparedness Week Schedule

 

Day of The Week Topics
Sunday Determine Your Risk
Monday Develop an Evacuation Plan/Know Your Zone/Storm Surge
Tuesday Assemble Disaster Supplies/High Winds
Wednesday Get an Insurance Checkup/Inland Flooding
Thursday Strengthen Your Home/Tornadoes
Friday Help Your Neighbor/Rip Currents
Saturday Complete a Written Plan

 

Click on the tabs below for more hurricane preparedness information.

 

 

 

Sunday

Determine Your Risk

Determine Your Risk

 

 

Determine Your Risk Where You Live

What Are The Impacts From Any Tropical System?

 

Did you know that hurricanes or any tropical system can have FIVE major impacts?  These include storm surge, flooding, strong wind, tornadoes and rip currents. Today's topic is determining your risk. South Carolina is one of the most hurricane ravaged states in the country.  The entire state, from the mountains to the coast, is susceptible to hurricane and tropical storm impacts. The coastal areas of the state can be susceptible to storm surge, high winds, flooding and tornadoes.  The central portion of the state can be susceptible to inland freshwater flooding, high winds and tornadoes; and the western portion of the state can be susceptible to inland freshwater flooding, high winds, and tornadoes; and the western portion of the state can be susceptible to tornadoes, flash flooding, and resulting landslides from heavy rains. Even when hurricanes stay out to sea, the South Carolina coast can still be impacted by large swells and deadly rip currents!   

 

Why Should I Not Focus On The Category Alone?

The Saffir-Simpson Scale is a wind scale that uses WIND only to estimate potential damage.  Unfortunately this scale does not tell you about ALL of the impacts that a hurricane can produce.  It does not tell you how much rain will fall or how high the storm surge may be.  It does not tell you anything about potential impacts from tornadoes or rip currents.  It also does not give you information on how large the storm may be, or anything about the storm's movement.  In fact, water accounts for 90% of direct deaths from tropical systems, both from storm surge and flooding rain. Please keep this in mind this upcoming season.  Pay attention TO ALL of the impacts from a storm and not just the category.  Remember that Hurricane Florence was "just" a category 1 when it made landfall along our coast. 

 

When Is Hurricane Season?

The most active months for tropical systems in the Southeastern United States are August, September and October.  However, hurricanes have impacted our state as early as May and as late as November!  The peak tropical activity usually occurs in a six week period from mid-August to late September, during which time our state can experience multiple hurricanes or tropical storms within weeks of each other. 

 

 

Hurricane Terminology

 

  • Hurricane Warning:  An announcement that sustained winds of 74 mph or higher are expected somewhere within the specified area in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds. The warning can remain in effect when dangerously high water or a combination of dangerously high water and waves continue, even though winds may be less than hurricane force.
  • Hurricane Watch:  An announcement that sustained winds of 74 mph or higher are possible somewhere within the specified area in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
  • Tropical Storm Warning:  An announcement that sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph are expected somewhere within the specified area within 36 hours in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone.
  • Tropical Storm Watch:  An announcement that sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph are possible somewhere within the specified area within 48 hours in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone.

 

Hurricane Information Infographics

 

 

 

View Video For More

 

 

 


 

 

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You can also contact:

Steve Pfaff (Steven.Pfaff@noaa.gov) for additional information about Hurricane Preparedness.

 

 

 

 Satellite image taken on September 21, 1989 showing Hurricane Hugo approaching the South Carolina coast as a Category 4 hurricane.