National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

High Winds Creating Critical Fire Weather Threats in California; Heavy Rains Along Gulf Coast

Strong to high winds are creating critical fire weather conditions across much of California, and explosive fire growth in Southern California. Wind gradients gradually weaken Sunday and through mid next week. Conversely, very wet conditions will develop this week as week along the Gulf Coast; and unsettled weather pattern to the north with snow from the Great Basin to the High Plains. Read More >

Dense fog, occasionally reducing visibilities down to around one quarter mile or less, will be possible in the gray-shaded counties this morning. Slow down and use your low-beam headlights if you encounter reduced visibilities this morning. Elsewhere, patchy fog will be possible, with some visibility reductions to around 1 mile possible.
Rain has departed the area, but we'll be left with lots of low cloud cover and some fog this morning before gradual clearing takes place later this afternoon. Highs will be in the 50s north and in the lower 60s south.
Clouds will be on the increase late tonight, and some patchy fog could develop across parts of the region after midnight. Otherwise, winds will be light and temperatures will generally fall into the 40s tonight.
Another cold front will move into the region this evening and overnight. This front will result in a north wind shift, but gusty winds are not expected until Thursday. Low temperatures tonight and Thursday morning will be in the 30s for most locations.

 
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June 13th 2012 Severe Storms

 
 

Isolated severe storms developed across northern sections of North Texas late in the afternoon on June 13th, 2012. The storms pummeled parts of Dallas, Collin, and Fannin counties with hail the size of baseballs (2.75"), oranges (3"), and softballs (4.25"). Numerous cars and houses were severely damaged by the very large hail. Early damage estimates suggest that this storm may cost $900 million, making it one of the costliest hail storms ever in Texas. 

The Fannin County storm also produced a brief EF0 tornado and damaging straight line winds. The tornado damage occurred one mile north of the city of Randolph. Damage was done to homes, barns and crops. The highest wind speeds were approximately 85 mph. Large trees were snapped in the area near CR 4145 and CR 4160. 

Costliest Hail Storms in Texas
(in 2013 dollars)

1.  May 5, 1995 (Mayfest) - North Texas, $1.62 billion 

2.  April 28, 1992 - Fort Worth and Waco, $1.21 billion 

3.  April 5, 2003 - North Texas, $1.13 billion 

4.  June 13, 2012 - North Texas, estimated $901 million

5.  April 28, 1995 - DFW Airport, $654 million

6.  May 8, 1981 - Palo Pinto County to Dallas, $486 million

Data Source:
Insurance Council of Texas

Southern Fannin County Hail

City of Irving Hail

Parker (Collin County) Hail

City of Grand Prairie Hail

Northpark Center Hail

Fannin County
Fannin County
Fannin County
Fannin County
Fannin County
Fannin County